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Search results “Diagnostic surgical procedures for breast cancer” for the 2010
Will Breast Reconstruction Help After A Long Breast Cancer Diagnosis?
 
09:55
http://www.breastcenter.com/breast-reconstruction-procedures.php#ref=yt Listen to Kim's story about her breast reconstruction after her diagnosis of breast cancer. Her procedure at Center for Restorative Breast Surgery in New Orleans helped restore her self-confidence after such trying times. If you have been recently diagnosed and are looking for reconstruction alternatives, call (504) 899-2800 or visit http://www.breastcenter.com.
Breast Cancer Treatment Questions - Mayo Clinic
 
02:26
A diagnosis of breast cancer can leave you with lots of questions. Dr. Sarah McLaughlin, a breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida says there are three questions all newly diagnosed breast cancer patients should ask their health care providers. Dr. McLaughlin will also be taking your questions during a Twitter Chat to be held Friday, Oct. 22nd at noon ET. Tweet your questions to #mayochat.
Views: 2406 Mayo Clinic
Breast Cancer Surgery
 
01:32
Improved diagnostics can help many women avoid surgical biopsies. But when Breast Cancer is diagnosed, and surgery is required, there are a number of options. Breast Surgeon Dr. Gayle DiLalla explains.
Views: 2976 UNC REX Healthcare
Breast Conservation Surgery for Breast Cancer Patients
 
00:50
Provided by Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Berkeley and Oakland, CA There are several types of surgery that remove cancerous tissue from the breast. Depending on your diagnosis, your surgeon may recommend a lumpectomy (partial mastectomy), mastectomy, axillary node dissection and/or lymph node removal. You may also choose to have reconstructive surgery at the time of your cancer surgery or at a later time.
Mastectomy Modified Radical Breast Surgery PreOp® Patient Education Feature
 
09:51
http://www.PreOp.com -or- http://bit.ly/PreOpFacebook -or- http://bit.ly/PreOpTwitter - Patient Education - Patient Education Company Your doctor has recommended that you have a modified radical mastectomy. But what does that actually mean? Traditionally, a Radical Mastectomy called for the removal of the breast, surrounding tissue and even the chest muscle below. A Modified Radical Mastectomy is a procedure in which the breast and surrounding tissue are removed, while leaving the chest muscle intact. In most cases, mastectomy is required in order to remove cancerous tissue from the body. The extent of tissue removed is determined by the amount of cancer present in your body. A Modified Radical Mastectomy is one the most extensive forms of breast cancer surgery in that it calls for the complete removal not only of the breast, but of the lymph nodes as well. Lymph nodes are small junctions that join the vessels that make up the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system circulates a bodily fluid called lymph in the same way that the circulatory system carries blood. Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a modified radical mastectomy because the cancer in your breast may have begun to move into the lymph nodes under your arm as well as into your chest muscle. This procedure will permanently change the outward shape and appearance of your chest. So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation. Patient Education Company On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown. You may receive a sedative by mouth ... ... and an intravenous line may be put in. You will then be transferred to the operating table. In the operating room, a nurse will begin preparation by clipping or shaving your underarm.Patient Education The anesthesiologist will begin to administer anesthesia - most probably general anesthesia by injection and inhalation mask. The surgeon will then apply an antiseptic solution to the skin ... ... and place a sterile drape around the operative site. Two incisions will be made beginning at the middle of the chest ... - one along the top and one along the bottom of the breast - coming together just under the arm.Patient Education The skin is then lifted up and away, revealing the tissue underneath. Beginning at the clavicle - or collar bone - the surgeon then begins to carefully cut the breast tissue away from the muscles that lie just beneath. When the breast has been completely freed, it is lifted away, exposing the top layer of muscle, called the pectoralis major. The surgeon will pull this muscle temporarily aside exposing the next layer of muscle - the pectoralis minor. The surgeon will move this muscle aside, creating a clear view of the surrounding fatty tissue.Patient Education Within this fat deposit lie lymph nodes lymph vessels, blood vessels and nerves. Using great care not to damage the large thoracic nerve, your doctor will remove the lymph nodes and surrounding fat. Blood vessels will be tied off and your doctor will thoroughly examine the surrounding tissues for any other signs of disease. When the surgical team is satisfied that they have done all that they can to remove the cancer, they will release the muscles and other tissue. One or more drainage tubes will be temporarily inserted at the site while the healing process begins. They will then close the incision. Finally, a sterile bandage is applied. Patient Education Company
Needle Localization - Diagnostic and Biopsy Services for Breast Evaluation
 
01:20
To help the surgeon perform accurate removal of an area of concern, a small, thin, wire is placed near the nodule in the breast using ultrasound or mammographic imaging to guide the wire placement.
Views: 55038 UPMC
Understanding Your Treatment Path for Breast Cancer
 
08:04
Dr. Shannon N. Tierney is a breast surgeon at the Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle. She talks about how breast cancer develops, what to do with your diagnosis, and the surgical and other treatment options available. To learn more about breast cancer care at Swedish, please visit http://www.swedish.org/Services/Cancer-Institute/Services/Breast-Cancer
Views: 2464 Swedish
Stereotactic Biopsy - Diagnostic and Biopsy Services for Breast Evaluation
 
02:47
Stereotactic Biopsy is performed using a special table that has been equipped with a small mammography unit. The imaging unit identifies an area of concern seen on previous mammograms. A biopsy device attached to the imaging unit allows for precise location and tissue sampling of the area of concern.
Views: 223241 UPMC
Dr. Melvin Silverstein Discusses Hemibatwing Resection
 
12:30
Viewer discretion is advised- this video contains footage from live surgical procedures. http://www.hoag.org/Specialty/Breast-Program/Pages/treatment/Treatment-Options/oncoplastic-surgery-for-breast-cancer.aspx
Views: 1097 Hoag Hospital
Mastectomy Total Breast Surgery PreOp® Patient Education Feature
 
08:35
http://www.PreOp.com -or- http://bit.ly/PreOpFacebook -or- http://bit.ly/PreOpTwitter - Patient Education - Patient Education Company Your doctor has recommended that you have a total mastectomy. But what does that actually mean? Total Mastectomy is the removal of the breast. In most cases, mastectomy is required in order to remove cancerous tissue from the body. The extent of tissue removed is determined by the amount of cancer present in your body. Patient Education A total mastectomy involves the removal the breast, but not the removal of lymph nodes or chest muscle that lies underneath the breast. Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a total mastectomy because the cancer in your breast has progressed to the point that it is in danger of spreading into other parts of your body and the only way to make sure that all of the disease has been eliminated is to remove the entire breast. This is major surgery and the procedure will permanently change the outward shape and appearance of your chest. So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation. Patient Education Company On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown. You may receive a sedative by mouth ... ... and an intravenous line may be put in. You will then be transferred to the operating table. In the operating room, a nurse will begin preparation by clipping or shaving your underarm.Patient Education The anesthesiologist will begin to administer anesthesia - most probably general anesthesia by injection and inhalation mask. The surgeon will then apply an antiseptic solution to the skin ... ... and place a sterile drape around the operative site. Two incisions will be made beginning at the middle of the chest ... - one along the top and one along the bottom of the breast - coming together just under the arm.Patient Education The skin is then lifted up and away, revealing the tissue underneath. Beginning at the clavicle - or collar bone - the surgeon then begins to carefully cut the breast tissue away from the muscles that lie just beneath. When the breast has been completely freed, it is lifted away, exposing the top layer of muscle, called the pectoralis major. If the cancer has spread to this muscle, your doctor may elect remove it as well.Patient Education When the surgical team is satisfied that they have done all that they can to remove the cancer, they will release the muscles and other tissue. One or more drainage tubes will be temporarily inserted at the site while the healing process begins. They will then close the incision. Finally, a sterile bandage is applied. Your doctor understands that all medical care benefits from close collaboration between physician and patient -- so be sure to review, with your doctor, all risks and alternatives and make sure you understand the reasons behind the recommendation for this particular procedure. Patient Education Now let's talk in detail about the procedure your doctor has recommended. That particular recommendation was based on a number of factors: * the state of your health, * the severity of your condition, * an assessment of alternative treatments or procedures and finally, * the risks associated with doing nothing at all. Patient Education And remember, the final decision is up to you. No one can force you to undergo a surgical procedure against your will. In the case of any form of mastectomy as a treatment for cancer, the only real alternatives to surgery are radiation therapy and chemotherapy. But because breast cancer is so potentially dangerous, most patients who undergo mastectomy also receive radiation therapy, chemotherapy or both. In any case, your doctor has recommended this procedure because he or she believes that surgery is in your best interest and may even be vital to your survival. Choosing not to have this surgery could put your health and life at grave risk. You must make sure to talk with your doctor about all of your concerns before making a decision. But as with all cancer treatments, the decision to act should be made as soon as possible. Now I'd like to introduce you to another important member of the medical team -- the nurse.
Surgical Options: Understanding Breast Cancer
 
03:10
There are many successful surgical options for breast cancer treatment including lumpectomies and mastectomies. Hear from breast cancer survivors who have undergone these procedures.
Views: 449 UPMC
MRI Breast Biopsy - Diagnostic and Biopsy Services for Breast Evaluation
 
03:01
This is a method of performing a biopsy of an area of concern that has been best imaged using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).
Views: 58894 UPMC
Breast Cysts: What you need to know!
 
06:47
Breast cancer surgeon Dr. Kristi Funk performs a live breast cyst aspiration and explains what breast cysts are, whether they are dangerous, and how they are removed.
Views: 459171 Pink Lotus Power Up
Understanding Breast Cancer
 
06:20
Learning about cancer detection, breast tissue, and types and stages of breast cancer will increase your understanding about the disease.
Views: 12109 UPMC
Early Stage Breast Cancer Treatment - Two Surgeries: You Choose
 
02:40
http://www.healthdialog.com/ For most women with early-stage invasive breast cancer, mastectomy or lumpectomy with radiation are equally good options. Having one or the other makes no difference in how long you will live. Since both choices provide the same medical outcome, your choice depends on how you feel about: - How your body looks after your surgery—your appearance - How much time and energy your treatment involves and how much it disrupts your life - The chance that your cancer might come back in the breast or breast area (local recurrence). Health Dialog honors Breast Cancer Awareness Month by making our decision aid for Early Stage Breast Cancer available during October 2010: http://www.healthdialog.com/go/BCAM This video was produced jointly by Health Dialog and the Foundation for Informed Medical Decision Making.
Views: 20468 HealthDialog
Dr. Melvin Silverstein Discusses Crescent Resection
 
12:26
Viewer discretion is advised- this video contains footage from live surgical procedures. http://www.hoag.org/Specialty/Breast-Program/Pages/treatment/Treatment-Options/oncoplastic-surgery-for-breast-cancer.aspx
Views: 1143 Hoag Hospital
Community Health Lecture Series: Breast Cancer, 2 of 4
 
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http://www.einstein.yu.edu - Leslie Montgomery, M.D., reviews surgical options, including lumpectomy, mastectomy and reconstruction, at the Community Health Lecture Series on "Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment: Where We Are, Where We're Going." Dr. Montgomery is chief of breast surgery in the department of surgery at Einstein and the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Cancer Care. (November 30, 2010)
Breast Cancer Treatment (03): Surgery
 
03:28
Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Oakland and Berkeley, CA Breast Cancer Treatment Options (03): Surgery Video for Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Cancer A Breast Cancer Surgeon goes over the different options for surgery, from breast conservation to modified radical mastectomy. Also discusses the pathology that is done post surgery to help determine the next steps in treatment. The purpose of this video is to guide you through the stages of evaluation of this disease, describe factors that affect prognosis, and discuss various treatments which may be appropriate for you. We don't endorse or recommend one course of treatment over another, but rather provide this information to help you understand your options before you consult with your doctors about your treatment plan. Please note: Viewing this video works best over a high speed internet connection. If you'd prefer to receive a DVD copy, please call our office at (510) 204-1591.
Oncology Patient Education Breast Biopsy Needle
 
04:09
http://www.PreOp.com PreOp® Oncology Surgery Video ©2010 MedSelfEd, Inc. Your doctor understands that all medical care benefits from close collaboration between physician and patient -- so be sure to review, with your doctor, all risks and alternatives and make sure you understand the reasons behind the recommendation for this particular procedure. Now let's talk in detail about the procedure your doctor has recommended. That particular recommendation was based on a number of factors: * the state of your health, * the severity of your condition, * an assessment of alternative treatments or procedures and finally, * the risks associated with doing nothing at all. And remember, the final decision is up to you. No one can force you to undergo a surgical procedure against your will. Patient Education There are a number of methods of performing breast biopsy. The choice between them is generally made according to the location and size of the lump. In this video, we will focus only on simple needle biopsy - which is the attempt to use a hollow needle to take a sample of the tissue in question. Now I'd like to introduce you to another important member of the medical team -- the nurse. PreOp® Oncology Surgery Video ©2010 MedSelfEd, Inc. http://www.PreOp.com PreOp® Oncology Surgery Video ©2010 MedSelfEd, Inc. Before we talk about treatment, let's start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition. Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a breast biopsy procedure - using a hollow needle to sample a portion of a lump or thickening in the breast. But what does that actually mean? Biopsy is a general term which simply means "the removal of tissue for microscopic examination." Your doctor intends to remove tissue from the breast - not because you're necessarily ill - but because breast biopsy is a very accurate method for analyzing breast tissue. Because it provides such accurate diagnostic information, breast biopsy is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer. In your case, you have lump in your breast which is too small to be felt by touch. Your radiologist detected this abnormality while reviewing your recent mammogram - or breast x-ray. Let's take a moment to look at the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue. The breast is made of layers of skin, fat and breast tissue - all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is made up of a network of tiny milk-carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a lump can form among them. Most women experience periodic changes to their breasts. Cysts are some of the most common kinds of tissues that can grow large enough to be felt and to cause tenderness. Cysts often grow and then shrink without any medical intervention. A second kind of lump is caused by changes in breast tissue triggered by the growth of a cyst. Even after the cyst itself has gone away, it can leave fibrous tissue behind. This scar tissue can often be large enough to be felt. The third kind of growth is a tumor. Tumors can be either benign or cancerous and it is concern about this type of growth that has lead your doctor to recommend breast biopsy. In order to learn more about the nature of the lump in your breast your doctor would like to surgically remove it. Most likely, you're feeling some anxiety about this procedure, which is perfectly understandable. You should realize that it's natural to feel apprehensive about any kind of biopsy. In some cases, a woman will choose not to have a biopsy simply out of fear. But ignoring a lump in your breast won't make it go away. If you're feeling anxious, try to remember that the purpose of a biopsy is simply to find out what is going on in your body - so that if you do have a problem, it can be diagnosed and treated as quickly as possible. If you should decide not to allow your doctor to perform the biopsy, you'll be leaving yourself at risk for medical problems. If the suspicious tissue in your breast is benign, most likely you'll suffer few if any complications. However, if it is cancerous, and it is allowed to grow unchecked - you might be putting your own life at risk. The bottom line - trust that your doctor is recommending this procedure for your benefit and above all don't be afraid to ask questions raised by this video and to talk openly about your concerns. PreOp® Oncology Surgery Video ©2010 MedSelfEd, Inc.
Views: 732 OncologyCenter
Breast Cancer Surgery and Recovery
 
11:11
Dr. Patricia L. Dawson is a breast surgeon at the Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle. She provides a general overview of breast cancer surgery, what to expect in the hospital, and some helpful hints for when you go home. To learn more about breast cancer care at Swedish, please visit http://www.swedish.org/Services/Cancer-Institute/Services/Breast-Cancer
Views: 3608 Swedish
Breast Reconstruction Surgery: Understanding Breast Cancer
 
04:22
Patients who have a mastectomy can choose to use prosthesis or to have reconstructive surgery. Surgical oncologists and plastic surgeons work together to provide a pleasing outcome to patients.
Views: 4304 UPMC
Ultrasound Breast Biopsy - Diagnostic and Biopsy Services for Breast Evaluation
 
01:15
This is a method of performing a biopsy of a lump or nodule felt in the breast and seen on ultrasound.
Views: 14123 UPMC
Mastectomy: Understanding Breast Cancer
 
03:41
Learn about mastectomy surgery including the procedure, reasons for choosing a mastectomy over a lumpectomy, and post-operative care. Cancer survivors discuss choosing a mastectomy.
Views: 1841 UPMC
Breast Cancer Treatment
 
02:02
Altru Health System, Breast Cancer Treatment, Tomotherapy
Views: 12550 AltruHealthSystem
Breast Biopsy Incisional Cancer Surgery PreOp® Patient Education
 
03:50
http://www.PreOp.com -or- http://bit.ly/PreOpFacebook -or- http://bit.ly/PreOpTwitter - Patient Education - Patient Education Company Before we talk about treatment, let's start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition. Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a breast biopsy procedure - or lumpectomy. But what does that actually mean? Biopsy is a general term which simply means "the removal of tissue for microscopic examination." Your doctor intends to remove tissue from the breast - not because you're necessarily ill - but because breast biopsy is a very accurate method for analyzing breast tissue. Because it provides such accurate diagnostic information, breast biopsy is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer. In your case, you have lump or thickening in your breast. It was felt by you or your doctor during a routine breast exam or discovered following a mammogram. Let's take a moment to look at the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue. The breast is made of layers of skin, fat and breast tissue - all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is made up of a network of tiny-milk carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a lump can form among them. Patient Education Company You will feel some pressure or even slight tugging or pulling - but you should not feel any sharp pain. If you do begin to feel pain, you should tell the doctor and you will be given more anesthetic. Once the lump is removed, the doctor will close the skin over the incision as neatly and as cosmetically as they are able. Finally, a sterile dressing is applied. Your specimen will be sent immediately to a lab for microscopic analysis. Your doctor will tell you when to expect result from those tests. Patient Education Company
Post Cancer Breast Reconstruction
 
27:40
Physicians at the Center for Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center treat patients to restore both functionality and aesthetic conditions following treatment for trauma, cancer, and other diseases. Drs. Peter Neligan and Otway Louie discuss options for breast reconstruction following cancer surgery, including a procedure that uses a patient's own abdominal tissue to create natural implants, the options for matching breast shape after a single mastectomy, and nipple reconstruction for a more natural appearance. Cindy Perry, a cancer patient who had breast reconstruction with Dr. Otway Louie, talks about her experience with using her own tissue for an implant.
Views: 1857 UW Video
Oral Cancer: Treatment and Reconstruction
 
28:18
For months Carolyn Coogan pursued dental solutions for the pain in her jaw. Then an MRI revealed cancer. Coogan and Dr. Neal Futran, director of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center, recount the diagnosis and her available treatment options. Coogan's treatment crossed medical disciplines, involving surgeries to remove cancer and reconstruct the jaw, and installation of the dental prosthesis. The program includes still images from Coogan's jaw surgeries and models of the bones involved.
Views: 20882 UW Video
Breast Biopsy Needle Surgery PreOp® Patient Education
 
04:09
http://www.PreOp.com -or- http://bit.ly/PreOpFacebook -or- http://bit.ly/PreOpTwitter - Patient Education - Patient Education Company Before we talk about treatment, let's start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition. Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a breast biopsy procedure - using a hollow needle to sample a portion of a lump or thickening in the breast. But what does that actually mean? Biopsy is a general term which simply means "the removal of tissue for microscopic examination." Your doctor intends to remove tissue from the breast - not because you're necessarily ill - but because breast biopsy is a very accurate method for analyzing breast tissue. Because it provides such accurate diagnostic information, breast biopsy is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer. In your case, you have lump in your breast which is too small to be felt by touch. Your radiologist detected this abnormality while reviewing your recent mammogram - or breast x-ray. Let's take a moment to look at the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue. The breast is made of layers of skin, fat and breast tissue - all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is made up of a network of tiny milk-carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a lump can form among them. Most women experience periodic changes to their breasts. Cysts are some of the most common kinds of tissues that can grow large enough to be felt and to cause tenderness. Cysts often grow and then shrink without any medical intervention. A second kind of lump is caused by changes in breast tissue triggered by the growth of a cyst. Even after the cyst itself has gone away, it can leave fibrous tissue behind. This scar tissue can often be large enough to be felt. The third kind of growth is a tumor. Tumors can be either benign or cancerous and it is concern about this type of growth that has lead your doctor to recommend breast biopsy. In order to learn more about the nature of the lump in your breast your doctor would like to surgically remove it. Most likely, you're feeling some anxiety about this procedure, which is perfectly understandable. You should realize that it's natural to feel apprehensive about any kind of biopsy. In some cases, a woman will choose not to have a biopsy simply out of fear. But ignoring a lump in your breast won't make it go away. If you're feeling anxious, try to remember that the purpose of a biopsy is simply to find out what is going on in your body - so that if you do have a problem, it can be diagnosed and treated as quickly as possible. If you should decide not to allow your doctor to perform the biopsy, you'll be leaving yourself at risk for medical problems. If the suspicious tissue in your breast is benign, most likely you'll suffer few if any complications. However, if it is cancerous, and it is allowed to grow unchecked - you might be putting your own life at risk. The bottom line - trust that your doctor is recommending this procedure for your benefit and above all don't be afraid to ask questions raised by this video and to talk openly about your concerns. Patient Education Company
Mastectomy and Reconstruction - Expanders after Breast Cancer
 
07:08
Here's a little about what to expect after going though a mastectomy and reconstruction. I'll show you what the expanders look and feel like. You can also see what my scars look like after surgery. Overall the expanders aren't too bad, but I'm sure the breast implants will feel and look a lot more natural. Get updates and find out what I'm up to now to try to stay cancer-free. https://chachingqueen.com/about/cancer/ I'm a 31 year old mom who was diagnosed with stage 1, triple negative breast cancer. I had a double mastectomy, reconstruction, and 4 rounds of chemo. I made this video to help other women know what to expect when going through this. "breast cancer" mastectomy reconstruction expanders "breast implants" "boob job" scars bikini "hair regrowth after chemo" "young woman" "young mom" "what to expect" chemo "bald woman" "short hair" "triple negative" "Austin texas" livestrong, masectomy, "breast removal"
Views: 244664 Rachel Cha Ching Queen
The Late Effects of Breast Cancer Treatment
 
01:48
The late effects of breast cancer treatment should be addressed in a primary care setting. Issues like bone health and menopausal symptoms are discussed. From Kimberly Peairs, M.D., internal medicine specialist at Johns Hopkins Healthcare and Surgery Center at Green Spring Station in Baltimore, MD.
Breast Biopsy Incisional Surgery PreOp® Patient Education
 
06:43
http://on.fb.me/PreOp_com - NEW facebook page - it's cool! Patient Education Company Before we talk about treatment, let's start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition. Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a breast biopsy procedure - or lumpectomy. But what does that actually mean? Biopsy is a general term which simply means "the removal of tissue for microscopic examination." Your doctor intends to remove tissue from the breast - not because you're necessarily ill - but because breast biopsy is a very accurate method for analyzing breast tissue. Because it provides such accurate diagnostic information, breast biopsy is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer. In your case, you have lump or thickening in your breast. It was felt by you or your doctor during a routine breast exam or discovered following a mammogram. Let's take a moment to look at the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue. The breast is made of layers of skin, fat and breast tissue - all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is made up of a network of tiny-milk carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a lump can form among them. Patient Education Company http://on.fb.me/PreOp_com - NEW facebook page - it's cool! Patient Education Company Most women experience periodic changes to their breasts. Cysts are some of the most common kinds of tissues that can grow large enough to be felt and to cause tenderness. Cysts often grow and then shrink without any medical intervention. A second kind of lump is caused by changes in breast tissue triggered by the growth of a cyst. Even after the cyst itself has gone away, it can leave fibrous tissue behind. This scar tissue can often be large enough to be felt. The third kind of growth is a tumor. Tumors can be either benign or cancerous and it is concern about this type of growth that has lead your doctor to recommend breast biopsy. Sometimes you will have breast changes that can not be felt by physical examination alone; but may be seen on a mammogram. In order to learn more about the nature of the lump in your breast your doctor would like to surgically remove it. Most likely, you're feeling some anxiety about this procedure, which is perfectly understandable. You should realize that it's natural to feel apprehensive about any kind of biopsy. In some cases, a woman will choose not to have a biopsy simply out of fear. But ignoring a lump in your breast won't make it go away. If you're feeling anxious, try to remember that the purpose of a biopsy is simply to find out what is going on in your body - so that if you do have a problem, it can be diagnosed and treated as quickly as possible. If you should decide not to allow your doctor to perform the biopsy, you'll be leaving yourself at risk for medical problems. If the suspicious tissue in your breast is benign, most likely you'll suffer few if any complications. However, if it is cancerous, and it is allowed to grow unchecked - you might be putting your own life at risk. The bottom line - trust that your doctor is recommending this procedure for your benefit and above all don't be afraid to ask questions raised by this video and to talk openly about your concerns. Patient Education Company
What to Expect with Breast Cancer
 
08:25
Dr. Claire L. Buchanan is a breast surgeon at the Swedish Cancer Institute. She discusses the treatment of breast cancer and gives some tips about what happens at your first appointment. To learn more about breast cancer services at Swedish, please visit http://www.swedish.org/Services/Cancer-Institute/Services/Breast-Cancer
Views: 2018 Swedish
Breast Biopsy Wire Guide Surgery - Cancer-PreOp® Patient Education
 
04:48
http://www.PreOp.com -or- http://bit.ly/PreOpFacebook -or- http://bit.ly/PreOpTwitter - Patient Education - Patient Education Company Before we talk about treatment, let's start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition. Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a breast biopsy procedure - or lumpectomy. But what does that actually mean? Biopsy is a general term which simply means "the removal of tissue for microscopic examination." Your doctor intends to remove tissue from the breast - not because you're necessarily ill - but because breast biopsy is a very accurate method for analyzing breast tissue. Medical Malpractice Because it provides such accurate diagnostic information, breast biopsy is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer. In your case, you have lump in your breast which is too small to be felt by touch. Your radiologist detected this abnormality while reviewing your recent mammogram - or breast x-ray. Let's take a moment to look at the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue. Medical Malpractice The breast is made of layers of skin, fat and breast tissue - all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is made up of a network of tiny milk-carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a lump can form among them. Patient Education Company Now it's time to talk about the actual procedure your doctor has recommended for you. You may receive a sedative by mouth and an intravenous line may be put in. You will then be transferred to the operating table. Your doctor will scrub thoroughly and will apply an antiseptic solution to the skin around the area where the needle will be inserted. Then, the doctor will place a sterile drape or towels around the operative site... and will inject a local anesthetic. This will sting a bit, but your breast will quickly begin to feel numb. Usually, the surgeon will inject more than one spot - in order to make sure that the entire area is thoroughly numb Patient Education Company
Breast Reconstruction - UW Medicine
 
02:02
At UW Medicine's Center for Reconstructive Surgery, a patient undergoes breast reconstruction done at the same time as her double mastectomy. Drs. Peter Neligan and Hakim Said used the patient's own abdominal tissue to create natural implants.
Views: 2030 UW Medicine
How to Recognize Breast Cancer Symptoms
 
03:01
Watch more Client Videos videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/418228-How-to-Recognize-Breast-Cancer-Symptoms Over the course of a woman's lifetime, she may experience breast changes. While many end up being nothing to worry about, it's important to have any changes that you notice checked by a doctor -- just to be on the safe side. Here are the potential breast cancer symptoms to watch out for. Warning This video does not replace actual medical advice. Always consult your doctor with any questions or concerns. Step 1: Do a monthly self-exam Start performing a monthly self-exam as soon as your breasts are fully developed. Checking yourself regularly is important -- you need to know what your breasts feel like normally so you can recognize any changes. Examine yourself several days after your period ends, when your breasts are least likely to be swollen and tender. If you're no longer having periods, choose a day that's easy to remember, such as the first or last day of the month. Keep in mind that it's not uncommon for breasts to feel lumpy due to benign fibrocystic breast disease, cysts, scar tissue, infections, and other causes that have nothing to do with cancer. Tip For instructions on how to do a breast self-exam properly, go to "Breastcancer.org":http://www.breastcancer.org/. Step 2: Have lumps checked Know what you're feeling for: a lump that feels different from your breast's normal lumpiness, like discovering a pebble in your oatmeal. Though many lumps are benign, anything that feels new or odd should be checked by your doctor -- even if you've recently had a clean mammogram. Check for lumps in your armpits, too. Tip Cancerous lumps are more likely to be hard, painless, and unmovable. Step 3: Beware of dimpled skin Look for visible changes, like dimpled, puckered, thickened, reddened, or scaly breast skin, or a flattening or indentation on the breast. All are potential breast cancer symptoms that should be evaluated. Step 4: Note nipple changes Recognize the nipple changes that can indicate breast cancer -- pain; redness; scaliness; itching; skin thickening; the nipple turning inward; or discharge other than breast milk. Step 5: Have pain and swelling evaluated See your doctor about swelling in all or part of your breast, or breast pain. Though swelling and soreness are usually no cause for concern, these symptoms can be signs of a rare but aggressive form of the disease known as inflammatory breast cancer. Step 6: Get regular check-ups Have your doctor perform a breast examination at your yearly check-up, and begin annual mammograms at age 40. If you have a family history of the disease, tell your doctor: they may suggest that you start having mammograms at an earlier age. Knowing the signs of breast cancer -- and being proactive about knowing how to recognize them early -- is the best way to protect yourself. Did You Know? In a "Breastcancer.org":http://www.breastcancer.org/ survey of more than 2,200 women, 37 percent said they first detected their breast cancer with a self-exam.
Views: 2366630 Howcast
Failure To Diagnose Breast Cancer Costs Doctor $4.5 Million
 
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http://www.oginski-law.com In this case, the failure to diagnose breast cancer in a young woman with a husband and three children cost a group of doctors $4.5 million. What happened? The woman had complained of a lump in her breast and she was correctly referred for a mammogram. The mammogram results were interpreted as "normal" but her lump continue to grow. She was then referred to a breast surgeon for biopsy. Unfortunately, the surgeon failed to biopsy the actual lump, and instead got surrounding tissue which was read as "normal." After being reassured by various doctors that she only had cystic breasts and there was no cancer, she gave no further thought to her growing mass in her breast. Finally, the mass became so pronounced that upon further evaluation, she learned that she had stage IV breast cancer. When are treating doctors look back at the original tests, they realized that there was evidence of cancer which was never detected or treated. Watch the video to find out what treatment she could have received which would have saved her life. For more information about how medical malpractice cases like these work in New York, I encourage you to explore my website http://www.oginski-law.com. If you have legal questions, I urge you to pick up the phone and call me at 516-487-8207 or by e-mail at lawmed10@yahoo.com. I welcome your call. The Law Office of Gerald Oginski,LLC 25 Great Neck Rd., Ste. 4 Great Neck, NY 11021 516-487-8207 lawmed10@yahoo.com
Views: 360 Gerry Oginski
Breast Cancer, Mastectomy, & Reconstruction | What I Didn't Know
 
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This video is about some of the unexpected things I've had to deal with since deciding to have bilateral mastectomies.
Views: 111868 CourageIsMyStrength
Breast cancer & me a healing journey
 
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Our Foundation seeks to help women with breast cancer to live and thrive not just survive by connecting them, as well as the loved ones and medical teams who support them, with the experiences of other people who have faced the disease. In I Have Breast CancerNow What, published in France in 2007, 39 breast cancer survivors tell the stories of their diagnosis, surgical choices, and life after treatment in words and photographs. Top breast cancer surgeon, Dr. Pascal Bonnier, conceived the book to help patients and their loved ones better understand surgery options and decisions to undergo or forego reconstruction. With 39 womens honesty and courage and the talent and sensitivity of prize-winning photographer Florian Launette, I Have Breast CancerNow What is not only is a clear portrayal of currently available surgical and reconstructive options, but also an artistic work with tremendous emotional power. The books woman-to-woman and family-to-family testimonies aid people facing the disease in feeling less alone and more in control of medical decisions, as well as gaining strength for the healing journey of the rest of their lives. From 2007 to 2009 the books photos comprised ten photo exhibits in France, Belgium, and Switzerland and garnered tremendous media attention. The French Health Minister commissioned an exhibit at the Ministrys headquarters in Paris including 20 x 60 feet enlargements on the exterior walls, and the eight female Cabinet Ministers attended the opening along with the women of the book. Similar huge enlargements covered the walls of the European Parliament in Brussels in October 2008. More than 100 news stories appeared on television and radio and in numerous magazines and newspapers. The photo exhibits and media accounts exposed hundreds of thousands of people to myriad dimensions of the public health and personal challenges that breast cancer entails: the importance of early diagnosis and effective treatment; the epidemic nature of the number of families it touches; the invisibility, isolation, and enforced silence that survivors often feel; the discrimination that many face; how common media images of beauty and sexuality compound the trauma of those diagnosed with the disease; the life long challenges that do not end with surgery and immediate treatment.
Views: 800 BCHJFoundation
Diagnostic Mammography
 
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Yearly mammography is a great screening tool, but mammography can also be used as a diagnostic tool. Radiologist Dr. Julie Taber explains when diagnostic mammography comes into play
Views: 9069 UNC REX Healthcare
Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy, Breast Cancer
 
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I have found there is a lot of misunderstanding concerning breast reconstruction after a mastectomy. Here are the details of my upcoming surgery. Please forgive the quiet audio, trying to be quiet and not upset my family.
Views: 14305 CourageIsMyStrength
Understanding Pathology for Breast Cancer
 
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Dr. Sean Thornton, a pathologist with Cellnetix Laboratories and Pathology, talks about the pathology and biology of breast cancer and the role a pathologist plays in your care. To learn more about Cellnetix, please visit http://www.cellnetix.com
Views: 36229 Swedish
Oncology Patient Education Breast Biopsy Incisional
 
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http://www.PreOp.com PreOp® Oncology Surgery Video ©2010 MedSelfEd, Inc. Patient Education Before we talk about treatment, let's start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition. Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a breast biopsy procedure - or lumpectomy. But what does that actually mean? Biopsy is a general term which simply means "the removal of tissue for microscopic examination." Your doctor intends to remove tissue from the breast - not because you're necessarily ill - but because breast biopsy is a very accurate method for analyzing breast tissue. Because it provides such accurate diagnostic information, breast biopsy is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer. In your case, you have lump or thickening in your breast. It was felt by you or your doctor during a routine breast exam or discovered following a mammogram. Let's take a moment to look at the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue. The breast is made of layers of skin, fat and breast tissue - all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is made up of a network of tiny-milk carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a lump can form among them. PreOp® Oncology Surgery Video ©2010 MedSelfEd, Inc. Patient Education http://www.PreOp.com PreOp® Oncology Surgery Video ©2010 MedSelfEd, Inc. Most women experience periodic changes to their breasts. Cysts are some of the most common kinds of tissues that can grow large enough to be felt and to cause tenderness. Cysts often grow and then shrink without any medical intervention. A second kind of lump is caused by changes in breast tissue triggered by the growth of a cyst. Even after the cyst itself has gone away, it can leave fibrous tissue behind. This scar tissue can often be large enough to be felt. The third kind of growth is a tumor. Tumors can be either benign or cancerous and it is concern about this type of growth that has lead your doctor to recommend breast biopsy. Sometimes you will have breast changes that can not be felt by physical examination alone; but may be seen on a mammogram. In order to learn more about the nature of the lump in your breast your doctor would like to surgically remove it. Most likely, you're feeling some anxiety about this procedure, which is perfectly understandable. You should realize that it's natural to feel apprehensive about any kind of biopsy. In some cases, a woman will choose not to have a biopsy simply out of fear. But ignoring a lump in your breast won't make it go away. If you're feeling anxious, try to remember that the purpose of a biopsy is simply to find out what is going on in your body - so that if you do have a problem, it can be diagnosed and treated as quickly as possible. If you should decide not to allow your doctor to perform the biopsy, you'll be leaving yourself at risk for medical problems. If the suspicious tissue in your breast is benign, most likely you'll suffer few if any complications. However, if it is cancerous, and it is allowed to grow unchecked - you might be putting your own life at risk. The bottom line - trust that your doctor is recommending this procedure for your benefit and above all don't be afraid to ask questions raised by this video and to talk openly about your concerns. PreOp® Oncology Surgery Video ©2010 MedSelfEd, Inc.
Views: 544 OncologyCenter
Laura Duntley survived HER2-positive breast cancer
 
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Before surgery, Duntley received chemotherapy for her HER2-positive breast cancer. By the time she had her operation, the cancer was completely gone from her breast. She now receives regular injections of an antibody to prevent a recurrence of cancer. To learn more, visit http://www.siteman.wustl.edu
How can immediate DIEP flap breast reconstruction help?
 
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http://www.breastcenter.com/diep-flap-breast-reconstruction.php Breast Cancer is a complicated disease, but in this case DIEP Flap breast reconstruction by the Center for Restorative Breast Surgery was the right option for Leslie. Watch how Leslie explains the level of care and comfort that were provided to her during her DIEP flap breast reconstruction surgery by the wonderful doctors and staff at the Breast Center in New Orleans. To see if the Breast Center Doctors are right for you call (504) 899-2800 or visit http://www.breastcenter.com.
After Breast Reconstruction Surgery
 
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As with any surgery, there is a recovery period. Knowing what to expect after surgery may help you decide about surgery and how to plan for it. Hear from women about their experiences with recovery after breast reconstruction surgery.
Views: 910 UPMC
Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy Photos, Part 2 from Myself Together Again
 
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The Myself: Together Again story of delayed breast reconstruction following double mastectomy surgery that appears on this video was inspired by Debbie*, who agreed to have the process photographed so that other young women like her could get an idea of what to expect. Visit our website for more information at www.myselftogetheragain.org. Produced by Barton Creek Creative
Views: 14102 MyselfTogetherAgain
Breast Reconstruction Considerations to Make
 
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http://www.breastcenter.com/breast-reconstruction-procedures.php Breast Reconstruction is an important aspect of any breast cancer patients recovery. Watch Barb's story on the steps she took to ensure she received the best quality of care from diagnosis until breast reconstruction and beyond. She choose the Breast Center in New Orleans for her surgery, it was the right choice for her. "I felt like I came to the right place... I feel very lucky that I found them" For more information call call (504) 899-2800 or visit http://www.breastcenter.com
Breast Cancer, DIEP flap Reconstruction and Me | Part I
 
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Texas DIEP flap patient Tammy Carrington shares her breast cancer story from the day she was diagnosed to the day she had DIEP flap breast reconstruction with PRMA's Dr Chrysopoulo and "woke up with cleavage". Learn more about the DIEP flap at http://prma-enhance.com/breast-reconstruction/diep-flap/ Learn about the flap reconstruction process at http://breast-cancer-reconstruction.blogspot.com/2014/08/what-does-breast-reconstruction-involve.html PRMA specializes in microsurgical breast reconstruction and performs over 500 DIEP flaps per year. Patients are routinely welcomed from across Texas, throughout the US, and across the World. We are in-network for most US insurance plans and we do not balance bill. Learn more about Dr Chrysopoulo: http://prma-enhance.com/breast-reconstruction-surgeon/dr-chrysopoulo/ http://Breast-Cancer-Reconstruction.blogspot.com/ Follow us: http://www.facebook.com/DrChrysopoulo/ http://twitter.com/mchrysopoulo/ https://plus.google.com/+MinasChrysopouloMD/ Contact us: PRMA | Center for Advanced Breast Reconstruction San Antonio, Texas http://PRMA-enhance.com/ (800) 692-5565 patientadvocate@prmaplasticsurgery.com
TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER LIVER METASTASES. IS SURGERY A
 
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9th.World Comgress of the Intenational Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association-IHPBA-2010 - Buenos Aires Argentina -LIVER- DVD11 MINI ORAL -Liver metastases www.medicaldtv.com
Views: 276 medicaldtv
Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy Photos, Part 1 from Myself Together Again
 
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The Myself: Together Again story of delayed breast reconstruction following double mastectomy surgery that appears on this video was inspired by Debbie*, who agreed to have the process photographed so that other young women like her could get an idea of what to expect. Visit the website for more information www.myselftogetheragain.org. Produced by Barton Creek Creative
Views: 49200 MyselfTogetherAgain