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Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System
 
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This animation focuses on the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS), a classic endocrine system that helps to regulate long-term blood pressure and extracellular volume in the body. Many aspects of cardiovascular disease progression can be directly linked to the RAAS system. Mechanisms such as vascular inflammation, generation of reactive oxygen species and alterations of endothelial function are all known to play a role in atherosclerosis.
Views: 810571 Mechanisms in Medicine
Renin angiotensin system regulates blood pressure
 
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You can support the work of campbellteaching, at no cost whatsoever to yourself, if you use the link below as your bookmark to access Amazon. Thank you. If in the US use this link http://goo.gl/mDMfj5 If in the UK use this link http://goo.gl/j0htQ5 One of the proteins present in the blood is called angiotensinogen. This is a short protein produced by the liver and is inactive; it just circulates in the blood. However, when renin acts on angiotensinogen it converts it into another shorter protein called angiotensin I. As angiotensin I passes through the lungs it is converted into angiotensin II by an enzyme called angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). Angiotensin II is a powerful vascular vasoconstrictor; this will increase peripheral resistance which will in turn increase blood pressure. In addition to increasing BP by direct vasoconstriction angiotensin II also stimulates the secretion of aldosterone from the adrenal cortex. This will increasethe amount of sodium reabsorbed from the renal tubules and so increase levels of sodium in the blood. As mentioned, increased levels of sodium increases the osmotic potential of the blood and so it attracts more water. This means more water is retained in the plasma increasing blood volumes. These increased volumes will increase venous return and so blood pressure. Conversely, lower amounts of angiotensin II will reduce aldosterone secretion leading to more sodium excretion. This will lower sodium levels in the blood leading to lowered blood volumes and so lower BP. If the systemic blood pressure is increased the pressure in the afferent arteriole will also be increased. This will be detected by the JGA cells which will respond by reducing renin secretion. When less renin is present in the blood, more angeotensionogen will remain in inactive form. This renin-angiotensin-aldosterone mechanism allows the kidneys to regulate their own blood flow to an extent. When an organ regulates itself in this way it is called autoregulation. If for any reason the kidneys over-secrete renin blood pressure will be raised. An abnormally high BP is termed hypertension. Renin excess probably explains most cases of chronic hypertension. You may have come across ACE inhibiting drugs; these inhibit ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) and so inhibit the conversion of angiotensin I into angiotensin II. If there is less angiotensin II there will be less vasoconstriction and less secretion of aldosterone and so blood pressure will be lowered.
Views: 19410 Dr. John Campbell
Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) and Blood Pressure
 
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Check out the following links below! Over 1000+ Medical Questions: http://www.5minuteschool.com DONATE + SUPPORT US: http://paypal.me/5minuteschool Patreon: https://goo.gl/w841fz Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/5MinuteSchool Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/5minuteschool My personal Instagram: http://instagram.com/shahzaebb Contact us: contact@5minuteschool.com ______ In this video we explain what is the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System which is abbreviated as RAAS. We also discuss its relationship with blood pressure. ◅ Donate: http://www.5minuteschool.com/donate ◅ Website: htttp://www.5minuteschool.com ◅ Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/5minuteschool ◅ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/5minuteschool ◅ Email: contact@5minuteschool.com
Views: 27491 5MinuteSchool
General overview of the RAAS system: Cells and hormones | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Learn the important cells and hormones that are working together to control your blood pressure! Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/renin-production-in-the-kidneys?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-the-renal-system/v/secondary-active-transport-in-the-nephron?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 461318 khanacademymedicine
Aldosterone raises blood pressure and lowers potassium | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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See how Aldosterone effects the principal cells of the kidney to raise BP and lower potassium. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/aldosterone-removes-acid-from-the-blood?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/angiotensin-2-raises-blood-pressure?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 260847 khanacademymedicine
Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System
 
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http://www.handwrittentutorials.com - This tutorial explores the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System, its role in Blood Pressure, the enzymes, involved, and how drugs act upon the system. For more entirely FREE medical tutorials visit http://www.handwrittentutorials.com
Views: 493473 Handwritten Tutorials
Aldosterone and ADH | Renal system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Find out how Aldosterone and ADH cause changes in volume and osmolarity. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-gastrointestinal-system/rn-the-gastrointestinal-system/v/meet-the-gastrointestinal-tract?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/adh-effects-on-blood-pressure?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 389540 khanacademymedicine
Angiotensin 2 raises blood pressure | Renal system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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See how Angiotensin 2 effects 4 target "organs" to increase blood pressure. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/aldosterone-raises-blood-pressure-and-lowers-potassium?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/activating-angiotensin-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 120159 khanacademymedicine
Anatomy and Physiology: Endocrine System: Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) V2.0
 
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Overview of ANP for anatomy and physiology (no music version). Visit my site for a free A&P etext and more: http://www.drbruceforciea.com
Views: 14284 DrBruce Forciea
Glomerular Filtrate: Angiotensin II and Glomerular Filtration Rate
 
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This lesson answers the following: 1) What is angiotensin II? 2) Where does angiotensin II come from? 3) What is Angiotensin II's role in the regulation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR)?
Views: 7364 Lance Miller, PhD
Baroreflex Regulation of Blood Pressure, Animation.
 
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How heart rate is controlled by the parasympathetic and sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system, with overview of baroreceptor resetting. This video (updated with real voice) and other related images/videos (in HD) are available for instant download licensing here : https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/neurology ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia Baroreflex, or baroreceptor reflex, is one of the mechanisms the body uses to maintain stable blood pressure levels or homeostasis. Baroreflex is a rapid negative feedback loop in which an elevated blood pressure causes heart rate and blood pressure to decrease. Reversely, a decrease in blood pressure leads to an increased heart rate, returning blood pressure to normal levels. The reflex starts with specialized neurons called baroreceptors. These are stretch receptors located in the wall of the aortic arch and carotid sinus. Increased blood pressure stretches the wall of the aorta and carotid arteries causing baroreceptors to fire action potentials at a higher than normal rate. These increased activities are sent via the vagus and glossopharyngeal nerves to the nucleus of the tractus solitarius – the NTS - in the brainstem. In response to increased baroreceptor impulses, the NTS activates the parasympathetic system – the PSNS - and inhibits the sympathetic system – the SNS. As the PSNS and SNS have opposing effects on blood pressures, PSNS activation and SNS inhibition work together in the same direction to maximize blood pressure reduction. Parasympathetic stimulation decreases heart rate by releasing acetylcholine which acts on the pacemaker cells of the SA node. Inhibition of the sympathetic division decreases heart rate, stroke volume and at the same time causes vasodilation of blood vessels. Together, these events rapidly bring DOWN blood pressure levels back to normal. When a person has a sudden drop in blood pressure, for example when standing up, the decreased blood pressure is sensed by baroreceptors as a decrease in tension. Baroreceptors fire at a lower than normal rate and the information is again transmitted to the NTS. The NTS reacts by inhibiting parasympathetic and activating sympathetic activities. The sympathetic system releases norepinephrine which acts on the SA node to increase heart rate; on cardiac myocytes to increase stroke volume and on smooth muscle cells of blood vessels to cause vasoconstriction. Together, these events rapidly bring UP blood pressure levels back to normal. Baroreflex is a short-term response to sudden changes of blood pressure resulted from everyday activities and emotional states. If hypertension or hypotension persists for a long period of time, the baroreceptors will reset to the “new normal” levels. In hypertensive patients for example, baroreflex mechanism is adjusted to a higher “normal” pressure and therefore MAINTAINS hypertension rather than suppresses it. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 109488 Alila Medical Media
Blood Pressure Regulation | Hypotension | Part 1
 
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Ninja Nerds, Join us in this video where we discuss blood pressure regulation and what happens during hypotension (low blood pressure), and how the body recognizes and regulates this imbalance. ***SUPPORT US*** PATREON | https://www.patreon.com/NinjaNerdScience ***EVERY DOLLAR HELPS US GROW & IMPROVE OUR QUALITY*** FACEBOOK | https://www.facebook.com/NinjaNerdScience INSTAGRAM | https://www.instagram.com/ninjanerdscience/ For general inquiries email us at NinjaNerdScience@gmail.com
Views: 8921 Ninja Nerd Science
ADH effects on blood pressure | Renal system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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See how ADH acts on blood vessels and the kidney to raise blood pressure. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/aldosterone-and-adh?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/adh-secretion?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 145489 khanacademymedicine
BARORECEPTOR REFLEX, GRAVITY & POSTURAL HYPOTENSION by Professor Fink
 
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In this Video Lecture, Professor Fink describes why rising from a lying to a standing position imposes a stress to the Cardiovascular System. Professor Fink then reviews the BARORECEPTOR REFLEX that compensates for the decreased Blood Pressure & Blood Flow to the Brain caused by GRAVITY. Reference is made to gravitational "hydrostatic pressure" superimposed onto Blood Pressure, Venous Return, swelling [edema] of the feet during standing, SYNCOPE (fainting), POSTURAL (ORTHOSTATIC) HYPOTENSION, and why an elevated Body Temperature (associated with cutaneous vasodilation) exacerbates this gravitation effect. Check-out professor fink's web-site for additional resources in Biology, Anatomy, Physiology & Pharmacology: www.professorfink.com Down-loadable e-Books of the Lecture Outlines by Professor Fink can be purchased from the WLAC Bookstore at: https://wlac.redshelf.com/ “Hard Copy” Lecture Outlines can be purchased from the WLAC Bookstore at: http://onlinestore.wlac.edu/fink.asp
Views: 6115 professorfink
Regulation of blood pressure with baroreceptors | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Learn about how the arteries use nerve impulses to help regulate blood pressure. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nclex-rn-circulatory-system/rn-blood-pressure-control/v/parts-of-a-nephron?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nclex-rn-circulatory-system/blood-pressure/v/blood-pressure-changes-over-time?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 445701 khanacademymedicine
Renin Effect on Blood Pressure (Kidney)
 
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This video gives an explanation of how Renin works and its effect on blood pressure. Narration: Ryan Yee Course: BMS 300 Exam 4 Citation: John Walrond
Views: 417 Ryan Yee
What is renal hypertension? - Ask ADC video
 
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When we think of keeping our heart and arteries healthy, it's important to note that high blood pressure -- hypertension -- doesn't just affect the heart and brain. It can affect many of your body's organs, including your kidneys. Dr. Sonali Birewar, ADC Nephrology, explains what renal hypertension is and how it is managed.
Sodium Regulation: Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS)
 
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This lesson explores how the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) regulates blood pressure (i.e., effective circulating volume). In particular, how effective circulating volume (ECF) is monitored by baroreceptors, how sympathetic activation of granular cells leads to synthesis and release of renin, how renin leads to the formation of angiotensin II, the role of angiotensin II and sodium regulation and blood pressure, how aldosterone stimulates sodium reabsorption along the collecting duct. For help preparing for an exam on this and other topics, visit http://www.aniveo.com
Views: 11646 Lance Miller, PhD
Hyperaldosteronism - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is hyperaldosteronism? Hyperaldosteronism is a condition in where the adrenal glands produce too much of the hormone aldosterone. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 108391 Osmosis
RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN-ALDOSTERONE REFLEX by Professor Fink.wmv
 
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In this lecture, Professor Fink describes the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone homeostatic reflex, including its function [Regulation of Blood Volume/Blood Pressure & the circulating Na+ & K+ electrolyte levels], its mechanism, and its actions. Reference is made to the Juxtaglomerular (J-G) Cells, angiotensinogen, Angiotensin 1, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE), and Angiotensin 2. Professor Fink compares and contrasts Aldosterone with Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH). Professor Fink then describes the clinical conditions of Hypoaldosteronism and Hyperaldosteronism, making reference to hyperkalemia, hypokalemia, circulatory shock, hypovolemia, hypervolemia, and Renal Hypertension. Professor Fink ends the lecture by describing the use of Aldosterone Blockers (spironolactone; Aldactone), Angiotensin 2 Blockers (losartan; Cozaar), and ACE Inhibitors (lisinopril; Zestril) in the management of Renal Hypertension. Check-out professor fink's web-site or additional resources in Biology, Anatomy, Physiology & Pharmacology: www.professorfink.com Down-loadable e-books of the Lecture Outlines by Professor Fink (as well as "hard copy" versions) can be purchased from the WLAC Bookstore at: http://onlinestore.wlac.edu/fink.asp
Views: 56271 professorfink
Renin production in the kidneys | Renal system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Learn the three major triggers for Renin production by the Juxtaglomerular cells. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/activating-angiotensin-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/general-overview-of-the-raas-system-cells-and-hormones?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 279322 khanacademymedicine
Hypertension - Antihypertensive Medications
 
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A review of the classes, mechanisms, indications, and contraindications for antihypertensive meds, along with specific recommendations when starting therapy.
Views: 191888 Strong Medicine
What is hypertension? | Circulatory system diseases | Health & Medicine | Khan Academy
 
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Learn the categories of hypertension for systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/circulatory-system-diseases/hypertension/v/hypertension-symptoms-and-categories?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/circulatory-system-diseases/stroke/v/preventing-further-strokes?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=healthandmedicine Health & Medicine on Khan Academy: No organ quite symbolizes love like the heart. One reason may be that your heart helps you live, by moving ~5 liters (1.3 gallons) of blood through almost 100,000 kilometers (62,000 miles) of blood vessels every single minute! It has to do this all day, everyday, without ever taking a vacation! Now that is true love. Learn about how the heart works, how blood flows through the heart, where the blood goes after it leaves the heart, and what your heart is doing when it makes the sound “Lub Dub.” About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Health & Medicine channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1RAowgA3q8Gl7exSWJuDEw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 132539 khanacademymedicine
High blood pressure: How much apple cider vinegar should you take to cut high BP risk?
 
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If you're new, Subscribe! → https://bit.ly/2sH1zbw High blood pressure affects about one in four adults in the UK, although many won’t even realise they have it, according to the NHS. The condition, which is also known as hypertension, increases the risk of some life-threatening conditions. They include heart disease, strokes and heart attacks.High blood pressure symptoms can include difficulty breathing, having a pounding in your chest, or vision problems. But, you could lower your risk of hypertension by taking apple cider vinegar, it’s been claimed. Taking apple cider vinegar everyday could lower your blood pressure, scientists have claimed. It works by reducing the activity of the kidney hormone ‘renin’.Renin is responsible for instructing blood vessels to constrict or dilate. Constricting blood vessels causes blood pressure to rise.“By reducing the activity of renin, vinegar might help blood vessels to relax [in a similar way to ACE inhibitor drugs] so that blood pressure lowers,” said nutritionist Dr Sarah Brewer, on her website MyLowerBloodPressure.com. Taking apple cider vinegar could also lower cholesterol levels in blood vessels, said Brewer. Just two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar, which has been diluted in 200ml of water, twice a day could lower cholesterol, scientists claimed. Take the vinegar before a meal for two months to lower cholesterol by about 13 per cent. “While there are no guarantees, you may find it helpful to add apple cider vinegar to your diet to lower blood pressure and cholesterol,” she said. “Don’t overdo it. Apple cider vinegar is acidic and can erode teeth.“If taking apple cider vinegar regularly, dilute it with water before drinking, and drink the apple cider vinegar through a straw. ”You could also reduce your blood pressure by cutting back on the amount of salt in your diet, and by exercising regularly, said the NHS. The only way of knowing if you have hypertension is to have a blood pressure test. Every adult over 40 years old should have their blood pressure checked at least every five years. See a GP or pharmacist to check your blood pressure. .
Views: 11 Royal Fashion 123
HYPOTENSION SHOCK; TYPES & REFLEX RESPONSES by Professor Fink
 
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In this Video Lecture, Professor Fink describes the 3 major Cardiovascular factors that can lead to Acute Hypotension (Circulatory Shock): [1] Cardiogenic; [2] Low Resistance (Anaphylactic) & [3] Hypovolemic. Professor Fink then reviews the homeostatic reflexes that compensate for the drop in Blood Pressure, including the Baroreceptor Reflex and the Hormonal Reflexes (Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone and ADH). Reference is made to hemorrhagic shock, hypovolemic shock caused by extensive burns, dehydration associated osmotic diuresis via the Kidneys, fluid loss via the G-I Tract and profuse sweating (Heat Exhaustion). Check-out professor fink's web-site for additional resources in Biology, Anatomy, Physiology & Pharmacology: www.professorfink.com Down-loadable e-Books of the Lecture Outlines by Professor Fink can be purchased from the WLAC Bookstore at: https://wlac.redshelf.com/ “Hard Copy” Lecture Outlines can be purchased from the WLAC Bookstore at: http://onlinestore.wlac.edu/fink.asp
Views: 4743 professorfink
Juxtaglomerular Apparatus simple explaination | Bhushan Science
 
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In this video I discussed about the Juxtaglomerular Apparatus. The juxtaglomerular apparatus is a specialized structure formed by the distal convoluted tubule and the glomerular afferent arteriole. It is located near the vascular pole of the glomerulus and its main function is to regulate blood pressure and the filtration rate of the glomerulus. The macula densa is a collection of specialized epithelial cells in the distal convoluted tubule that detect sodium concentration of the fluid in the tubule. In response to elevated sodium, the macula densa cells trigger contraction of the afferent arteriole, reducing flow of blood to the glomerulus and the glomerular filtration rate. The juxtaglomerular cells, derived from smooth muscle cells, of the afferent arteriole secrete renin when blood pressure in the arteriole falls. Renin increases blood pressure via the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Lacis cells, also called extraglomerular mesangial cells, are flat and elongated cells located near the macula densa. Their function remains unclear.
Views: 2169 Bhushan Science
GFR 1 - Control of GFR
 
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http://www.handwrittentutorials.com - This tutorial discusses how the afferent and efferent arterioles of the nephron can be constricted and dilated to control the Glomerular Filtration Rate. To get the most out of this video, we suggest you watch the Renal Anatomy series before watching this tutorial. For more entirely FREE tutorials and their accompanying PDFs, visit http://www.handwrittentutorials.com
Views: 182279 Handwritten Tutorials
Renin, Angiotensin, Aldosterone System. Part 1
 
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http://www.SimpleNursing.com (click Here) FULL ACCESS to over 1,200 Videos (only 200 free here) "82% on Your Next Nursing Test" Nursing Students in nursing school this video was made for you. Mike Linares, Expert EKG instructor & Nursing Student Mentor reveals the secrets to understanding ACE inhibitors, ARBs & Calcium channel blockers. Discover how we help Nursing Students get an 82% on their Next Nursing Test. Go to www.SimpleNursing.com
Views: 153855 Simple Nursing
Urinary System, part 1: Crash Course A&P #38
 
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Even though you probably don't choose to spend a lot of time thinking about it, your pee is kind of a big deal. Today we're talking about the anatomy of your urinary system, and how your kidneys filter metabolic waste and balance salt and water concentrations in the blood. We'll cover how nephrons use glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption, and tubular secretion to reabsorb water and nutrients back into the blood, and make urine with the leftovers. Anatomy of Hank poster: http://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-anatomy-and-physiology-poster Table of Contents Kidneys Filter Metabolic Waste & Balance Salt & Water Concentrations in the Blood 1:25 Nephrons 4:13 Glomerular Filtration 4:37 Tublar Reabsorption 5:14 Tubular Secretion 8:17 Urine 8:40 *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1763388 CrashCourse
Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System 1/7
 
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Watch 800+ videos on Basic Sciences & Clinical Medicine at https://www.DrNajeebLectures.com. New videos every 3 days with download option. Master Medical Sciences with Dr. Najeeb. World's Most Popular Medical Lectures. Trusted by 1M+ Medical, Dentistry, Nursing & Pharmacy students in 190 countries. ──────────────────────────── OFFICIAL LINKS: Website: https://www.DrNajeebLectures.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrNajeeb Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/DrNajeebLectures Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/DrNajeeb Android App: http://bit.ly/dr-najeeb-android ───────────────── OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL ───────────────── Here on YouTube, we only upload free sample videos. If you like these videos you can check out our entire video library on our website at https://www.DrNajeebLectures.com. We have over 800+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences & Clinical Medicine and over 1M+ members from 190 countries. ────────────────────── WHY SIGN UP FOR MEMBERSHIP? ────────────────────── ► 800+ Medical Lectures. ► Basic Medical Sciences. ► Clinical Medicine. ► New videos every week in HD. ► Download videos for offline access. ► Fast video playback (0.5x - 2x) ► Watch videos on any device. ► Fanatic customer support. ► Trusted by 1 million students. Learn more at https://www.DrNajeebLectures.com
Views: 803882 Dr. Najeeb Lectures
How Long Does It Take High Blood Pressure To Damage Kidneys?
 
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How Long Does It Take High Blood Pressure To Damage Kidneys? There is one organ which causes high blood pressure (and it's not what you think!) and there are specific exercises you can use to target and fix your blood pressure easily. No diet, lifestyle changes or medication required: http://hibloodpressure.stream/ Answers from: Michael L. Jirka Matthew Morrish Paul Wilson Matthew Morrish Gangadharan Nair Ray Schilling Let's turn this question on its head. The kidney controls blood pressure with the hormone Renin. How Does Renin-Angiotensin System Regulate Blood Pressure? So what if the kidney thinks it is not getting its fair share of blood? Do you think it will react with great bluster? So if diabetes narrows/hardens all the arterioles in the body and the kidney sensed it is not getting its fair share of blood, it will release these hormones to boost pressure and its share of blood. So I ask you, which came first. diabetes hardening the arteries and lessening their effectiveness to move blood and therefore needing more pressure to move blood through smaller vessels ... or the Kidney sensing less blood flow and getting all pissed off about it [pun intended], Diabetes is obviously hardening of the arteries came first ... but without diabetes, you are likely to present in the Drs office with abnormal kidney function and high blood pressure at the same time. Too late to definitely determine the cause. The high blood pressure may have caused the kidney damage OR the kidney was getting sick and it requested more blood pressure to compensate which caused it more damage. More: https://youtu.be/6eLYW9sIUSA Subscribe to our channel!
Views: 13 Owen Gillen
How do the kidneys help regulate blood pressure ? | Health Info
 
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Howstuffworks human kidney kidney8. Is it really only our kidneys that control blood pressure? . Eurekalert the role of kidney in regulating arterial blood pressure. The increased blood volume helps stretch the heart muscle and causes it to actions taken by kidney regulate pressure are especially renin. Kidney dopamine regulates blood pressure, life span sciencedaily. The role of the endocrine system in blood pressure regulation and kidney function renadyl. Understanding this hormone will help you understand your body better, and aldosterone affects the body's ability to regulate blood pressure 29 cardiac output, flow, stimulates stretch receptors in left how does kidney control volume? . When the arteries become damaged, nephrons do not receive damaged kidneys fail to regulate blood pressure 15 did you know can edit or help wikivet in other ways? New content! contents. Kidney disease controlling your blood pressure cardiosmart. Take a look at the things kidneys do that makes them so important. Googleusercontent search. The effects of hypertension on the body healthline. Kidneys work the national kidney foundation. How high blood pressure can lead to kidney damage or failure. It also causes the kidneys to retain more sodium and water, which raises volume of blood find out how renin angiotensin system or ras regulates pressure fluid balance in body is an enzyme, produced by kidneys, that plays important role aldosterone hormonal system, helps control 28 kidney regulating arterial. Kidney control of blood pressure anatomy & physiology wikivet regulation in the kidney (practice) cliffs notes. Reducing saturated fat and cholesterol can help control high levels of lipids, or fats, in the blood 13. The role of the endocrine system in blood pressure regulation volume by kidneys human physiology. The kidneys and urinary tractfunction, disorders the system homeostasis. How kidneys influence blood pressure health. Control of blood pressure; 2 renal regulation considering its involvement in pressure regulation, the kidney has enzyme renin, which is involved regulating pressure, do 5 problems contact; Help center support community share your story press following mechanisms help regulate kidneys provide a hormonal mechanism for by managing priority upon arriving at scene should be to assess removing sodium, and thus water, how with ph? Does secrete helps pressure? . Your kidneys help remove waste from the blood, regulate blood volume and pressure, filter in order to do this well, they need healthy vessels. 21 2011 now, researchers report that dopamine produced outside the brain in the kidneys is important for renal function, blood pressure regulation hypertension, or high blood pressure, can have many damaging effects on the body. Power minerals to lower your blood pressure rodale wellnessregulation of volume by the kidneys human physiology. Angiotensin ii causes blood vessels to constrict, which raises the pressure. The renin angiotensin system and blood pressure control you your hormones from the society for endocrinology. Solutions for chapter 16 problem 1eqa. And discussed in this review demonstrate that it should come as no surprise how does high blood pressure affect the kidneys? Pressure. Blood pressure can lead to kidney damage or failure. The role of the kidney in regulating arterial blood pressurehigh pressure & disease regulates youtube. Other hormones produced by the kidneys help regulate blood pressure and control calcium a large vessel called renal artery takes this hormone also helps more salt to be your brain plays part in regulating fluid balance kidney produces 85 percent of circulating epoif you move how do these stem cells work protect or repair kidney? The through na water retention loss 22 2007 are here home regulation role humoral substance kidneys, influences. So which organ is really in the kidney plays a central role regulation of arterial blood pressure. Renin is a hormone that produced by the kidneys and it acts to elevate blood pressure. Problem 1eqa how do the kidneys help to regulate blood pressure? 116 step by solutions; Solved professors your keep pressure in a normal kidney disease even if you did not have high there are many steps can take control 13 but special nerve pathways mean brain also urine production and hence influence. Htm url? Q webcache. 15 the kidneys help filter wastes and extra fluids from blood, and they use a lot of blood vessels to do so. That it should come as no surprise that most disorders affect the kidney or 22 2007 you are here home regulation of blood pressure role a humoral substance produced in kidneys, also influences 29 cardiac output, flow, and stimulates stretch receptors left how does help to control volume? . Your kidneys help to regulate blood pressure not only does hypertension damage the kidney, but kidney causes 3 too much sodium really boost pressure, high converting enzyme, a compound that helps by tightening arteries and encouraging your hold
Primary Hyperaldosteronism
 
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Subscribe to this channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKDwY2bhQtcMUZ3UFdN3Mng?sub_confirmation=1 Other Endocrinology Lectures: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfBFwAwues0l7OpPoCazPLoOPTkRfUsRR Primary aldosteronism, also known as primary hyperaldosteronism or Conn's syndrome, refers to the excess production of the hormone aldosterone from the adrenal glands, resulting in low renin levels. This abnormality is caused by hyperplasia or tumors. Many suffer from fatigue, potassium deficiency and high blood pressure which may cause poor vision, confusion or headaches. Symptoms may also include: muscular aches and weakness, muscle spasms, low back and flank pain from the kidneys, trembling, tingling sensations, numbness and excessive urination. Complications include cardiovascular disease such as stroke, myocardial infarction, kidney failure, and abnormal heart rhythms. Primary hyperaldosteronism has a number of causes. About 33% of cases are due to adrenal adenoma that produces aldosterone and 66% of cases are due to an enlargement of both adrenal glands. Other uncommon causes include adrenal cancer and an inherited disorder called familial hyperaldosteronism. Some recommend screening people with high blood pressure who are at increased risk while others recommend screening all people with high blood pressure for the disease. Screening is usually done by measuring the aldosterone-to-renin ratio in the blood with further testing used to confirm positive results. While low blood potassium is classically described this is only present in about a quarter of people. To determine the underlying cause medical imaging is carried out. Some cases may be cured by removing the adenoma by surgery. A single adrenal gland may also be removed in cases where only one is enlarged. In cases due to enlargement of both glands treatment is typically with medications known as aldosterone antagonists such as spironolactone or eplerenone. Other medications for high blood pressure and a low salt diet may also be needed. Some people with familial hyperaldosteronism may be treated with the steroid dexamethasone. People often have few or no symptoms. They may get occasional muscular weakness, muscle spasms, tingling sensations, or excessive urination. High blood pressure, manifestations of muscle cramps (due to hyperexcitability of neurons secondary to low blood calcium), muscle weakness (due to hypoexcitability of skeletal muscles secondary to hypokalemia), and headaches (due to low blood potassium or high blood pressure) may be seen. Secondary hyperaldosteronism is often related to decreased cardiac output which is associated with elevated renin levels. Screening may be considered in people with high blood pressure presenting with low blood potassium, high blood pressure that is difficult to treat, other family members with the same condition, or a mass on the adrenal gland. Measuring aldosterone alone is not considered adequate to diagnose primary hyperaldosteronism. Rather, both renin and aldosterone are measured, and a resultant aldosterone-to-renin ratio is used for case detection. A high aldosterone-to-renin ratio suggests the presence of primary hyperaldosteronism. The diagnosis is made by performing a saline suppression test, ambulatory salt loading test, or fludrocortisone suppression test. If primary hyperaldosteronism is confirmed biochemically, CT scanning or other cross-sectional imaging can confirm the presence of an adrenal abnormality, possibly an adrenal cortical adenoma (aldosteronoma), adrenal carcinoma, bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, or other less common changes. Imaging findings may ultimately lead to other necessary diagnostic studies, such as adrenal venous sampling, to clarify the cause. It is not uncommon for adults to have bilateral sources of aldosterone hypersecretion in the presence of a nonfunctioning adrenal cortical adenoma, making adrenal venous sampling mandatory in cases where surgery is being considered. The diagnosis is best accomplished by an appropriately-trained subspecialist, though primary care providers are critical in recognizing clinical features of primary aldosteronism and obtaining the first blood tests for case detection. The treatment for hyperaldosteronism depends on the underlying cause. In people with a single benign tumor (adenoma), surgical removal (adrenalectomy) may be curative. This is usually performed laparoscopically, through several very small incisions. For people with hyperplasia of both glands, successful treatment is often achieved with spironolactone or eplerenone, drugs that block the effect of aldosterone. With its antiandrogen effect, spironolactone drug therapy may have a range of effects in males, including sometimes gynecomastia. These symptoms usually do not occur with eplerenone drug therapy. more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primary_aldosteronism
Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System (RAAS) - MADE SUPER EASY
 
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Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System (RAAS) EXPLAINED - MADE EASY This video tutorial is brought to you by: Ali Feili, M.B.A., M.D. ✔ ✔ More on Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System: http://www.medical-institution.com/renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system/ ✔ ✔ ACE Inhibitors Side Effect Mnemonic: http://www.medical-institution.com/ace-inhibitors-mnemonic/ ✔ FREE Medical Videos: http://freemedicalvideos.com/ ✔ Website: http://www.medical-institution.com/ ✔ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Medicalinstitution ✔ Twitter: https://twitter.com/USMLE_HighYield ✔ Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+Medicalinstitution ✔ Patron: https://www.patreon.com/medicalinstitution ✔ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/medicalinstitut/ ✔ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/Medical_institution_USMLE/ This information is intended for educational purposes only, and should not be interpreted as medical advice. Please consult your physician for advice about changes that may affect your health. Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System - MADE EASY Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System explained What is Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System Explain Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System Described Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System simplified Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System super easy Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System animation Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System for medical students best lecture on Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System Easiest lecture on Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System Khan academy Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System conrad fischer Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System USMLE RAAS What is RAAS How does aldosterone work on the kidneys
Views: 268023 Medical Institution
Sodium and Potassium Metabolism (Renin, Angiotensin, Aldosterone, and ADH)
 
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A review of the normal physiology of sodium, potassium, and water. Major topics covered include the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, ADH (antidiuretic hormone), and the natriuretic peptides.
Views: 178756 Strong Medicine
How To Lower Blood Pressure Without Medication
 
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How To Lower Blood Pressure Without Medication: Fleur de Sel - http://www.resourcesforlife.net/index.php?id_product=390&controller=product&id_lang=1 Gros Sel Guerande - http://www.resourcesforlife.net/index.php?id_product=393&controller=product&id_lang=1 pdf file 'Disease and Prevention': http://www.resourcesforlife.net/img/cms/Disease%20&%20Prevention.pdf pdf file: Don'r Be Conned By The Crusade Against Salt': http://www.resourcesforlife.net/img/cms/Dont_Be_Conned_By_The_Crusade_Against_Salt.pdf Blood Pressure is one of the most misunderstood areas of modern medicine. High blood-pressure problems lie not, as were told, in excessive salt intake but in an overactive hormone system and the associated increase in renin levels. Renin is a protein (enzyme) released by kidney cells when sodium levels decrease or there is a low blood volume. Renin helps balance the levels of sodium and potassium in the blood as well as fluid levels in the body. When the hormone system becomes overactive, renin levels are excessively high bringing about a physiological need for salt. The prevailing perspective of modem medicine is that salt is a poison, just like tobacco and alcohol. Doctors have taught us since childhood that "salt causes high blood pressure." Books on salt-free cooking are more popular than ever. Call up your country’s Heart Association and they’ll send you brochures on the dangers of salt. There are two types of salt at work here. I’m talking about the differences between refined salt and unrefined salt. Refined salt is the salt you buy in supermarkets and other commercial outlets. Consumption of these is indeed harmful as evidenced by many medical studies. This really shouldn’t be sold under a salt label because it’s NOT salt. It’s sodium chloride as a result of a degrading industrial process involving cement basins, super heating, mineral stripping and the addition of fructose for artificial flavouring and aluminium to give it a free flow. Who on earth wants aluminium in their food? The salt you should be consuming is unrefined salt. Unrefined salt is rich in life giving minerals and trace elements that help to boost your immune system. Lo salt diets can be harmful as they may • raise blood pressure • induce liver failure • cause kidney problems • bring on accelerated ageing through cellular degeneration • cause adrenal exhaustion • tire the valves of the heart • cause obesity and sexual paralysis When Biochemist Dr Jacques de Langre was 55 years old he was tested in Boston by two medical doctors. They both said he had the blood pressure of a 20 year old. When he was 64 he was checked again. No change, and the doctor added that there was absolutely no evidence of cholesterol deposits in his arteries. In this age of depleted foods we ALL need to be on unrefined salts. They scour the body pulling out excess salt deposits in the tissues, lowering blood pressure as it removes these deposits through the kidneys. Ninety-nine percent of people on Western Diets are mineral deficient and many poor health conditions are linked to a simple mineral deficiency. Celtic Sea Salt is available in France from most supermarkets, the UK from Resources For Life and in the USA/Canada from Selina de Langre (Dr Jaques De Langre’s daughter). Fleur de Sel - http://www.resourcesforlife.net/index.php?id_product=390&controller=product&id_lang=1 Gros Sel Guerande - http://www.resourcesforlife.net/index.php?id_product=393&controller=product&id_lang=1 This presentation contains images that were used under a Creative Commons License. Click here to see the full list of images and attributions: https://app.contentsamurai.com/cc/28726 Also see: SelinaNaturally - http://www.selinanaturally.com/celtic-sea-salt-products/ https://www.youtube.com/dashboard?o=U https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jr4LCqc4WIE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BewHunhEXI
Views: 980 Graeme Dinnen
High blood pressure: What is a healthy blood pressure reading? - what you need to know
 
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If you're new, Subscribe! → https://bit.ly/2sH1zbw High blood pressure doesn’t cause symptoms unless it is extreme, where signs include stomach pain and severe headaches. This means that most people living with the condition don’t realise they have it, so they can’t start treatment to avoid premature death. Having high blood pressure increases your risk of developing heart disease and stroke. You can measure your blood pressure with your doctor, or at home, using a blood pressure monitor. According to Blood Pressure UK, a healthy blood pressure reading is between 90/60 mmHg and 120/80 mmHg. The monitor takes two different readings to get this result, your systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The systolic blood pressure, first number, is the pressure when your heart beats and pushes blood round the body. Whereas, the diastolic blood pressure, second number, is the lowest pressure when your heart relaxes between beats. “Only one of the numbers has to be higher or lower than it should be to count as either high blood pressure or low blood pressure,” says Blood Pressure UK, on its website. It adds that if you have a reading 140/90 mmHg you “may” have high blood pressure. When checking blood pressure, you should measure it in both arms. A 2012 study by Exeter researchers published in The Lancet found that measuring blood pressure in both arms increased the chance of identifying health problems, such as high blood pressure. They suggested that if the difference between blood pressure in your arteries during the contraction of your heart, or systolic blood pressure, is 10 mmHg or more, this could indicate high blood pressure, and an increased risk of premature death from associated conditions. Guidelines for GPs in the UK say that they should measure blood pressure by taking readings from both arms, however this doesn’t always happen. One of Blood Pressure UK’s Trustee's, Professor Bryan Williams, reiterated that “This study reinforces the message already in the blood pressure management guidelines [to check blood pressure in both arms]. ”You could lower your blood pressure by consuming apple cider vinegar more often, it has been claimed. It works by reducing the activity of the kidney hormone ‘renin’.Renin is responsible for instructing blood vessels to constrict or dilate. Constricting blood vessels causes blood pressure to rise.“By reducing the activity of renin, vinegar might help blood vessels to relax [in a similar way to ACE inhibitor drugs] so that blood pressure lowers,” said nutritionist Dr Sarah Brewer, on her website MyLowerBloodPressure.com.
Views: 11 Royal Fashion 123
Aldosterone functions
 
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Aldosterone plays an important role in blood pressure controlling... Angiotensin helps in this...
Views: 1858 Medical World
Aldosterone: Sodium and Potassium Balance - Na+/K+ Balance - Explained in 5 Minutes!!
 
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Check out the following links below! Over 1000+ Medical Questions: http://www.5minuteschool.com DONATE + SUPPORT US: http://paypal.me/5minuteschool Patreon: https://goo.gl/w841fz Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/5MinuteSchool Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/5minuteschool My personal Instagram: http://instagram.com/shahzaebb Contact us: contact@5minuteschool.com ______ In this video we talk about the effects of Aldosterone on Sodium and Potassium balance in the kidneys. ◅ Donate: http://www.5minuteschool.com/donate ◅ Website: htttp://www.5minuteschool.com ◅ Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/5minuteschool ◅ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/5minuteschool ◅ Email: contact@5minuteschool.com
Views: 32977 5MinuteSchool
ACE Inhibitors Made Easy for Nurses!
 
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Whether you are giving medicines or you are studying for a pharmacology test, knowing the pathophysiology and knowing how the medication class works inside the body is very beneficial! ACE Inhibitors are an antihypertensive drug class that lower blood pressure by working on the RAAS system. What is RAAS? Renin, angiotensin, aldosterone system. The RAAS is used by the body to increase blood pressure in healthy people. However if you are struggling with high blood pressure you may not want this system working at full capacity am I right!? That's where ACE inhibitors come in. They put a stopper on this system causing a decrease in blood pressure by reducing total volume and total peripheral resistance in the body. WHEW! That was a mouthful! The video is much less complicated, its EASY! Check out my other "Made Easy" videos: Interpreting the ABG https://youtu.be/Ak-Y56SfkS0 DKA Made Easy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGgaS18__Ew Disclaimer: This video is meant to be used for informational and educational purposes only. Although I research and strive for complete accuracy of all content, before relying on advice from this video users should independently verify and obtain appropriate professional advice as they see fit.
Views: 27138 Will Wilson
Study: Hormone Linked to High Blood Pressure Increases Diabetes Risk, Too
 
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(COLUMBUS, Ohio) – About 30 million Americans live with diabetes, and the numbers continue to grow. However, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center believe that targeting a certain hormone may be key in preventing the disease. Aldosterone is a hormone produced by the adrenal gland that is commonly associated with high blood pressure, but a new study finds that there is also a strong link to Type 2 diabetes. “Aldosterone increases insulin resistance and also impairs insulin secretion from the pancreas, which are the two main causes of Type 2 diabetes,” said Dr. Joshua J. Joseph, assistant professor of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism and lead author of the study. The researchers followed 1,600 people for 10 years and found that the one-third of participants with the highest levels of the hormone were more than twice as likely to develop diabetes as the third who had the lowest levels. There were also major disparities among different ethnic groups. African-Americans in the top one-third had nearly three times the risk of developing the disease, while the risk for Chinese-Americans was more than 10 fold. “We are now examining why aldosterone affects certain ethnic groups differently. It could be due to genetics or possibly differences in salt sensitivity,” Joseph said. “We will further examine the role of this hormone in diabetes prevention in a new clinical trial.” The trial will use medication to lower aldosterone levels in African-Americans with pre-diabetes. Researchers will monitor how this impacts their glucose and insulin levels. “When combined with healthy lifestyle changes to diet and exercise, I believe that lowering aldosterone levels may help individuals avoid diabetes and the many health issues that come with it,” Joseph said.
Hormone Reg of BP
 
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This video describes the hormonal regulation of blood pressure in the cardiovascular system. It is a part of the video lecture series for my BIO 108 class at D'Youville College. For my students: be sure to answer the questions at the end of the lesson found on Moodle
Views: 1116 Laura Hechtel
Aldosterone removes acid from the blood | Renal system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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See how Aldosterone acts on the alpha-intercalated cell to remove protons (acid) from the blood. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/adh-secretion?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-renal-regulation-of-blood/v/aldosterone-raises-blood-pressure-and-lowers-potassium?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 104654 khanacademymedicine
Use of the Aldosterone and Renin Ration for earlier diagnosis of Primary Aldosteronism
 
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Use of the Aldosterone and Renin Ration for earlier diagnosis of Primary Aldosteronism
Views: 1218 Diasorin Italy
Hypertension for USMLE
 
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Hypertension pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, complications, and management. Handwritten hypertension full lecture for students taking the USMLE Steps. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF HYPERTENSION Blood pressure is equal to the cardiac output times the total peripheral resistance. Cardiac output is equal to Stroke Volume times the Heart rate (per minute). Total Peripheral Resistance is determined by the radius of the vessel and compliance. The primary body systems which help control blood pressure and hypertension is the: Autonomic Nervous System alpha1 - vasoconstriction Beta1 - Increases heart rate Alpha2 - Decrease sympathetic activity Renin Aldosterone Angiotensin System Hormones Cortisol, Epinephrine, Thyroid and many more. COMPLICATIONS OF HYPERTENSION Cardiovascular System complications of hypertension - Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Confestive Heart Failure, Sudden Cardiac Death Stroke complcations of hypertension- Infarction, Subarachnoid hemorrhage, Intracerebral hemorrhage, Lacunar infarcts Renal - Common cause of secondary hypertension, End Stage Renal Disease, Renal Injury, more common in blacks. Arteries - Atherosclerosis, Claudication DEFINITION OF HYPERTENSION Normal Blood pressure is less than 120/80 Pre Hypertension is less than 120-139/80-89 Stage 1 Hypertension is less than 140-159/90-99 Stage 2 Hypertension is greater than 160/100 Isolated Systoilc Hypertension and Isolate Diastolic Hypertension can also occur. Require minimum of two blood pressure reading over 3 months. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring is better because can determine night time dip by 10-15%. Also helps distinguish whitecoat hypertension and masked hypertension. Essential hypertension is when there is no cause identified and is the most common cause. Secondary hypertension can be due to drugs such as OCP, NSAID, TCA, SSRI, Glucocorticoid, EPO, Cyclosporin, Decongestant, Renal causes such as tumor cysts, renal artery stenosis. Adrenal causes of hypertension include high aldosterone, cushings and pheochromocytoma. Endocrine causes of hypertension include hyperthyroidism and hypercalcemia. Aortic coarcation, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia are also other causes of hypertension. EVALUATION No specific symptoms can help you diagnose hypertension. Check BMI, Blood pressure in both arms, Fundoscope, Bruits, Thryoid, murmurs (loud S2 and S4 gallop). Also perform a full Cardiovascular and Neurological examination. LABS Renal labs such as urinalysis and albuminuria. ALso rule out metabolic syndrome by checking blood glucose, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and TAGs. Electrolytes such as Na, K, Calcium. TREATMENT Initial treatment for pre hypertension is lifestyle intervention. For hypertension it can help decrease dosage of drug required. Weight reduction alone can decrease blood pressure by 5-20mmHg/10kg. Ideal BMI is less than 25. Decrease salt intake can also help control hypertension by decrease salt to less than 6g per day. Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Diet is high in fruits and vegetables and low in fat can help lower hypertension by 8 to 14mmHg. Physical activity can also help decrease hypertension by 4-9mmHg. Pharmacological therapy is used when blood pressure is greater than 140/90. If african american than start with Thiazide and Calcium Channel Blockers, while ACE Inhibitors and ARB are better for patients with Renal disease, Diabetes, Chronic Kidney disease. Beta Blockers for patients with ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Alpha blocker for patients with
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How Does The Aldosterone Affect The Nephron?
 
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Hbs review flashcards 3. Understanding this hormone will help you understand your body better, and take measures to ensure optimal health. This, in turn, leads to the production of new proteins that will serve increase sodium reabsorption 25 jan 2015. Water balance adh, angiotensin, aldosterone schoolworkhelper. For more when aldosterone production falls too low, the kidneys are not able to regulate water and salt balance, leading a drop in both blood volume bp 24 sep 2012. Make sure to reference the effect of aldosterone on electrolytes and note gland that is responsible for this chapter focuses primary abnormalities hypersecretion, a number related conditions in which mineralocorticoids other than produce similar clinical biochemical characteristics, syndrome with ion transport at distal nephron can mimic 28 may 2017. If yours aren't quite right, it can be caused by conn's syndrome also called primary hyperaldosteronism, this happens when your body makes too much aldosterone. Water is conserved as it reabsorbed back into the body tissues. If decreased blood pressure is detected, the adrenal gland stimulated by these stretch receptors to release aldosterone, which increases sodium reabsorption from urine, sweat, and gut. However, the way in which this hormone works differs from mechanism of adh. Adh causes the collecting duct to become more permeable water. When water levels are high, adh and leave the body. Aldosterone, a steroid hormone with mineralocorticoid activity, is mainly recognized for its action on sodium reabsorption in the distal nephron of kidney, which mediated by epithelial channel (enac) aldosterone part group linked hormones, form renin angiotensin system. No red blood cells get filtered out, so there should never be in the urinehow do hormones adh and aldosterone affect nephron body's overall water balance? Adh (antidiuretic hormone, vasopressin) aldosteroneadrenal glands (adrenal cortex) affects sodium, potassium, total fluid body, pressure. This causes increased osmolarity in the extracellular fluid, which will eventually return blood pressure toward normal aldosterone is produced cortex of adrenal glands, are located above kidneys. Produced in the cortex of adrenal glands which are located above each kidney. 16 mar 2010 aldosterone effects on the kidney and cardiovascular system. Googleusercontent search. Cl is also reabsorbed forming nacl; As nacl reabsorption increases, the osmotic gradient increases and more water moves out of nephron, thus 19 sep 2012note that another hormone, aldosterone, helps maintain a balance. Research the way in which aldosterone affects nephron. What is the function of aldosterone hormone? . Endocrine system aldosterone and adh (video) ucsf missing link. Gov pubmed 20234356 similar 16 mar 2010 aldosterone effects on the kidney and cardiovascular system. Aldosterone is a steroid hormone produced in the glomerulosa cells of adrenal cortex. Aldosterone aldosterone also directly affects the heart and
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Renal artery stenosis - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is renal artery stenosis? Renal artery stenosis describes a condition where the artery delivering blood to kidney becomes narrowed. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
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Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)  Pathophysiology
 
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ANP hormone and effects
 
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atrial natriuretic peptide Disclaimer: Study your highlighted notes in your text for your test (or what your teacher requires). by Darrell Barnes on February 20, 2017
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