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Diagnosis of Breast Cancer
 
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This is a Learning in 10 voice annotated presentation (VAP) on Diagnosis of Breast Cancer. To learn more about Learning in 10 (LIT), please visit learningin10.com. -- Learning in 10 (LIT) Reviews is a collection of 10-minute, user-friendly video lectures covering topics in the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) Step 2CK examination. LIT Reviews can be used by medical students to supplement their lecture materials. LIT Reviews have been created by world-class clinical faculty and each video undergoes a peer-review process to ensure accuracy of information.
Views: 1226 Learning in 10
Treatment Timeline for Breast Cancer: The Steps Ahead
 
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We teach you about the steps needed to diagnose and effectively treat your breast cancer. Know what comes next in your breast cancer journey. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ __________________________________________ You have plenty of time to make decisions Making good decisions is the most difficult part of having breast cancer. You will feel pressed for time to learn everything and start your treatment as soon as possible. Time is usually on your side. You must work with your team to learn everything about your cancer and treatment options. We created the Breast Cancer School for Patients to quickly teach you to be your own expert in breast cancer. You will make better decisions once you become your own “expert” and best advocate. A few facts about time to treatment: The average time from the date of cancer diagnosis to the day of lumpectomy surgery is about 32 days. The average time to mastectomy surgery is about 40 days. It can take anywhere from 3 to 12 months from cancer diagnosis to complete your final treatments, and up to ten years if you need hormonal therapy. It is a marathon. Conserve your emotional and physical efforts for the challenges ahead. Finding your breast cancer (1 – 3 weeks) Most small breast cancers are found on screening mammography and possibly by ultrasound or maybe a breast MRI. You may have detected your own breast lump and sought further help from your physician. The time to schedule a mammogram, have it performed, return for further breast imaging and then get the results can take days to weeks. Always ask to have your tests and appointments scheduled as soon as possible. Getting a diagnosis: biopsy & results (2 – 14 days) Getting scheduled to have an image-guided breast biopsy by a breast surgeon or radiologist can vary. Most NAPBC accredited Breast Centers work quickly to schedule biopsies for those who might have a breast cancer. Our “Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy“ lesson (here) outlines why needle biopsies are the standard of care. Make sure to ask (demand) that the physician who does your biopsy personally calls you with the results within a day or two. Call for your biopsy pathology results if you think there is a delay. My pathology report: (3 – 14 days) Ask for a copy of your initial biopsy report that will be available in 2-3 days. Ask for a copy of your final pathology report with your receptor results. Our courses on “My Pathology Report” and “My Receptors” offer more details. Surgery or chemotherapy first? Surgery is usually the first treatment for early stage breast cancer. Most patients will not need chemotherapy. If you have Estrogen receptor negative (ER-) or a “HER2-Positive“ tumor, then you will likely need chemotherapy either before or after surgery. There are distinct benefits to “Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy” before surgery. Take our video lessons linked to these topics. Is radiation needed? (4 – 6 weeks) Most patients that have a lumpectomy will need radiation. Whole breast radiation is the most common type and takes 4 to 6 weeks. Only a few patients that have a mastectomy will also need radiation. Patient-Friendly References: NCCN Guidelines for Patients www.nccn.org You will find well-organized guides (here) on breast cancer treatment by stage. Follow the prompts to breast cancer and then “stage” in the dropdown menus. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network is a consortium of organizations and governmental agencies to promote quality
Breast Cancer (Breast Tissue, BRCA genes, Biopsy, Lumpectomy, Mastectomy, Mammogram, & Treatment)
 
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Learn about Breast Cancer, Screening, Mammograms, Biopsy, Lumpectomy, Mastectomy, Diagnosis, BRCA genes, Her2, Treatment, DCIS, LCIS, Ductal Carcinoma, & Lobular Carcinoma. This video was created to promote awareness about breast cancer. However, this information cannot substitute for health care provided for by a physician or other qualified medical professional. Some of the content used in this video was obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). http://www.cancer.gov/ For more information: http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/cid/documents/webcontent/003090-pdf.pdf Thank you for the support: Bill Branson, Photogroup, Don Bliss, Dr. Dwight Kaufman, Andy Rahardja, Zuhha Ashraf, and Elliott Burdette Thanks to our teachers: Daniel Kleven, Michael Boyd, Natasha Savage, and Ravindra Kolhe. Collaborations: Video Reviewer: Dr. Christopher Heaton
Views: 234810 Ryan Jajosky
Triple Negative Breast Cancer Diagnosis & Treatment Plan | lovefrommim.com
 
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http://www.lovefrommim.com/my-triple-negative-breast-cancer-diagnosis-treatment-plan - Dec 2015 Last month I was diagnosed with Triple Negative Breast Cancer. In this video I talk about my diagnosis, surgery and treatment plan of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Please excuse how tired I look - my sleep isn't great right now! :) I've also blogged about my diagnosis here: http://www.lovefrommim.com/i-have-breast-cancer/
Views: 4706 Mim Jenkinson
How Does Chemotherapy Treat Breast Cancer?
 
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This week Reactions takes a look at the the chemistry and science of how chemotherapy and other cancer treatments work concerning breast cancer. Breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Fortunately, the rate at which we’re learning about this disease means patients have a lot more treatment options and far better chances of survival than they did 100 years ago. In observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Reactions describes what’s changed about how we treat breast cancer and what patients can expect in the future. Find us on all these places: Subscribe! http://bit.ly/ACSReactions Facebook! http://facebook.com/ACSReactions Twitter! http://twitter.com/ACSReactions Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/acsreactions/ Tumblr! http://acsreactions.tumblr.com/ Producer: Elaine Seward Writer: Alexa Billow Executive Producer: Adam Dylewski Scientific consultants: Ana I. Tergas, M.D., M.P.H. Brian Blagg, Ph.D. Darcy Gentleman, Ph.D. Kyle Nackers Music: Modern Medicine Genome Project Sources: http://assets.cambridge.org/97805214/96322/excerpt/9780521496322_excerpt.pdf http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/tbj.12361/epdf?referrer_access_token=Qim8QlMtylSezEnAWvACU4ta6bR2k8jH0KrdpFOxC679BJkuV0KUyY2z1fB8RheA8BvhWW6l4HLasvk0WP771oFVmadcHCEmjPgqZHuzb773FsVHi6gllAlo3ESMEoharf5wv9x1rj1ZwaaSbOkEacZbZuoL0xxQYXs5gWMv3LkrjC6RmnWKhpeZKYMNfT25_vZwsrJDGfuSADXDenMocA%3D%3D https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/treatment/surgery-for-breast-cancer.html https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/treatment/radiation-for-breast-cancer.html https://www.livescience.com/36394-radiation-treatments-cancer-work.html https://breast-cancer-research.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/bcr424 https://web.archive.org/web/20070619012859/http://www.fda.gov/cder/news/tamoxifen/ http://www.chemocare.com/chemotherapy/drug-info/Tamoxifen.aspx http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/jco.2014.55.4139 http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/jco.2014.55.4139 http://chemocare.com/chemotherapy/drug-info/Trastuzumab.aspx https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5327815/ https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/basic_info/treatment.htm https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5327815/ http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/jco.2014.55.4139 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28799073 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5541087/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5391398/ http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/breast-cancer-treatment Ever wonder why dogs sniff each others' butts? Or how Adderall works? Or whether it's OK to pee in the pool? We've got you covered: Reactions a web series about the chemistry that surrounds you every day. Reactions is produced by the American Chemical Society.
Views: 24828 Reactions
Treatment Options For Early Stage Breast Cancer
 
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In this video, Daniel Reed explains different treatment options for the first stages of breast cancer. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/#
 
Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask.
 
This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk. If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Breast Cancer Surgery Options
 
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Dr. Leigh Neumayer, from Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, discussing surgical breast cancer options.
Diagnosis methods & surgical treatments of breast cancer 2/2 | Doctor Naanga Eppadi Irukanum | News7
 
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NEWS7 TAMIL Oncology breast surgeon Dr. Selvi Radhakrishnan from Chennai Breast Centre explains about Diagnosis methods and surgical treatments of breast cancer. Mainly she talks about biopsy and artificial breasts for the cancer patients. http://www.NS7.tv facebook: http://fb.com/News7Tamil twitter: http://twitter.com/News7Tamil News 7 Tamil Television, part of Alliance Broadcasting Private Limited, is rapidly growing into a most watched and most respected news channel both in India as well as among the Tamil global diaspora. The channel’s strength has been its in-depth coverage coupled with the quality of international television production.
Views: 1946 News7 Tamil
Surgical Options for Breast Cancer
 
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James W Jakub, M.D., breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic, talks about the surgical options for patients with a breast cancer diagnosis. Dr. Jakub touches on the advantages and disadvantages of lumpectomy and mastectomy, and the differences each procedure entails.
Views: 1359 Mayo Clinic
Breast Cancer: Its Diagnostic and Treatment Procedures Explained by Dr. Raja Sundaram
 
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Dr. Raja Sundaram is the Director of Oncology Services and the Lead Surgical Oncologist at Global Heath City, Chennai. With 20 years of experience, Dr. Sundaram has performed over 10,000 cancer surgeries with various complexities. Here, Dr. Sundaram explains the four stages of breast cancer and describes the diagnostic and surgical procedures and other non-surgical treatment options of chemotherapy, targeted therapy and hormonal therapy. View his complete profile here: http://www.vaidam.com/doctors/dr-raja-sundaram-oncologist-onco-surgeon Visit our website: http://www.vaidam.com/ Know the cost of breast cancer: http://www.vaidam.com/cost/breast-cancer-cost-in-india Get in touch with us: Email ID: hello@vaidam.com Call: +91 9650001746 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vaidamhealth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/vaidamh
Views: 246 Vaidam
Breast Cancer Diagnostic Process
 
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A tissue sample is needed in order to make a definitive breast cancer diagnosis. Learn about the process of getting tissue and more from Dr. Harness in this video. Click Here To Get Dr. Harness' 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, ‪http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask‬ In this clip, Jay Harness, MD, FACS explains how breast cancer is diagnosed. Well, to make a definitive diagnosis, you need tissue. The best way to get tissue is either through a fine needle biopsy, which gets individualized cells, or a core needle biopsy. Obviously, the suspicion that you have a diagnosis of breast cancer is made based on your physical examination and/or it's made based on your imaging studies. But the bottom line is you need tissue in order to definitively make a diagnosis. I would always encourage that that tissue be obtained with needle biopsies and not through an open excision or incisional biopsy. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Breast Conservation Surgery for Breast Cancer Patients
 
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Provided by Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Berkeley and Oakland, CA There are several types of surgery that remove cancerous tissue from the breast. Depending on your diagnosis, your surgeon may recommend a lumpectomy (partial mastectomy), mastectomy, axillary node dissection and/or lymph node removal. You may also choose to have reconstructive surgery at the time of your cancer surgery or at a later time.
Cancer Patient Undergoes Lumpectomy and IORT
 
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WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT In this video depicting an actual surgery, Dr. Maen Farha, medical director of the MedStar Union Memorial Hospital breast center in Baltimore, will remove a cancerous tumor and surrounding tissue from a patient's breast. Intraoperative radiation therapy, or IORT, is then used during the surgery to treat the tissue that surrounded the tumor with a high dose of radiation. IORT may reduce the risk of cancer returning to where it was removed. Learn more about Dr. Maen Farha at http://www.medstarhealth.org/doctor/dr-maen-jamel-farha-md-facs. For media interviews with Dr Farha, call Debra Schindler, regional director of media & public relations for MedStar Health: 410-274-1260.
Views: 48243 MedStar Health
Janet Harrison on how she survived breast cancer and breast ca surgery (full story)
 
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Janet Harrison came in to give her account of breast cancer, which was diagnosed in 2011. She discusses the diagnosis, surgery with mastectomy and chemotherapy (including side effects). Janet mentions the effect of a cancer diagnosis on her mental wellbeing. She also discusses returning to work, and the adaptations she undertook throughout her recovery. Janet talks about the importance of the support she received from group meetings. Janet mentions satisfaction with the abdominal flap for breast reconstruction (TRAM flap) and with aftercare. Janet gives excellent insight into emotional complications. She talks about feeling angry, feeling lost in the system, feeling isolated after initial treatment. Janet mentions benefits of psycho-oncology team (psychosocial care), voluntary services at Coping with Cancer (Helen Webb House) and also contacting Samaritans when desperate. She talks about return to work issues and work related stress and pros and cons of antidepressants and peer support (groups). Janet says it is ok to take it easy and do pleasurable things when needed. [20mins] Thank Janet! 0:47 - Introduction 5:49 - Chapter 1 21:53 - Chapter 2 33:26 - Chapter 3 46:45 - Chapter 4 1:01:39 - Chapter 5 1:08:31- Ending credits Story by: Janet Harrison Diagnosis: Breast Cancer Interviewer: Alex J Mitchell Music: Emma O'Brien Resolution: 1080p Permissions: Email coping.with.cancer.uk@gmail.com Twitter: www.twitter.com/cancer_stories Facebook: www.facebook.com/cancerstoriesonline
Views: 267 MyCancerStory
Patient Education Breast Biopsy Needle Surgery
 
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http://www.memorialhealth.us/ Women's Center Before we talk about treatment, let's start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition. Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a breast biopsy procedure - using a hollow needle to sample a portion of a lump or thickening in the breast. But what does that actually mean? Biopsy is a general term which simply means "the removal of tissue for microscopic examination." Your doctor intends to remove tissue from the breast - not because you're necessarily ill - but because breast biopsy is a very accurate method for analyzing breast tissue. Because it provides such accurate diagnostic information, breast biopsy is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer. In your case, you have lump in your breast which is too small to be felt by touch. Your radiologist detected this abnormality while reviewing your recent mammogram - or breast x-ray. Let's take a moment to look at the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue. The breast is made of layers of skin, fat and breast tissue - all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is made up of a network of tiny milk-carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a lump can form among them. Most women experience periodic changes to their breasts. Cysts are some of the most common kinds of tissues that can grow large enough to be felt and to cause tenderness. Cysts often grow and then shrink without any medical intervention. A second kind of lump is caused by changes in breast tissue triggered by the growth of a cyst. Even after the cyst itself has gone away, it can leave fibrous tissue behind. This scar tissue can often be large enough to be felt. The third kind of growth is a tumor. Tumors can be either benign or cancerous and it is concern about this type of growth that has lead your doctor to recommend breast biopsy. In order to learn more about the nature of the lump in your breast your doctor would like to surgically remove it. Most likely, you're feeling some anxiety about this procedure, which is perfectly understandable. You should realize that it's natural to feel apprehensive about any kind of biopsy. In some cases, a woman will choose not to have a biopsy simply out of fear. But ignoring a lump in your breast won't make it go away. If you're feeling anxious, try to remember that the purpose of a biopsy is simply to find out what is going on in your body - so that if you do have a problem, it can be diagnosed and treated as quickly as possible. If you should decide not to allow your doctor to perform the biopsy, you'll be leaving yourself at risk for medical problems. If the suspicious tissue in your breast is benign, most likely you'll suffer few if any complications. However, if it is cancerous, and it is allowed to grow unchecked - you might be putting your own life at risk. The bottom line - trust that your doctor is recommending this procedure for your benefit and above all don't be afraid to ask questions raised by this video and to talk openly about your concerns. Your Procedure: On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown. You may receive a sedative by mouth and an intravenous line may be put in. You will then be transferred to the operating table. Your doctor will scrub thoroughly and will apply an antiseptic solution to the skin around the area where the needle will be inserted. Then, the doctor will place a sterile drape or towels around the operative site... and will inject a local anesthetic. This will sting a bit, but your breast will quickly begin to feel numb. Usually, the surgeon will inject more than one spot - in order to make sure that the entire area is thoroughly numb. After allowing a few minutes for the anesthetic to take effect, the surgeon will insert the biopsy needle and guide it toward the lump. You will feel some pressure or even slight tugging or pulling - but you should not feel any sharp pain. If you do begin to feel pain, you should tell the doctor. Once the tip of the needle has penetrated the lump, the doctor will draw material from the lump up into the collection chamber. Depending on the size and location of the lump your doctor may choose to reposition the needle and draw additional tissue for analysis. Finally, a sterile dressing is applied. Your specimen will be sent immediately to a lab for microscopic analysis. Your doctor will tell you when to expect result from those tests. Women's Center
Breast Cancer: Optimizing Early Detection and Personalized Treatment
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) 0:23 - Breast Cancer Imaging: Mammography, Ultrasound and Screening Controversies - Elissa Price, MD 21:19 - Innovations in the Surgical Management of Breast Cancer - Cheryl Ewing, MD 46:35 - Precision Imaging Advanced Breast Techniques - Bonnie Joe, MD 1:06:06 - Audience Questions Breast cancer screening is important for all women. Get the latest on screening tests for breast cancer and what the current recommendations are. Series: "UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine presents Mini Medical School for the Public" [12/2017] [Show ID: 32934]
Understanding Your Treatment Path for Breast Cancer
 
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Dr. Shannon N. Tierney is a breast surgeon at the Swedish Cancer Institute in Seattle. She talks about how breast cancer develops, what to do with your diagnosis, and the surgical and other treatment options available. To learn more about breast cancer care at Swedish, please visit http://www.swedish.org/Services/Cancer-Institute/Services/Breast-Cancer
Views: 2460 swedishseattle
Breast Cancer Surgery | Mastectomy and Lymphadenectomy | Breast Cancer awareness
 
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www.medfreelancers.com Breast Cancer Surgery | Mastectomy and Lymphadenectomy | Breast Cancer awareness Breast cancer Specialty Oncology Symptoms Lump in a breast, change in breast shape, dimpling of the skin, fluid coming from the nipple, a newly inverted nipple, red scaly patch of skin Risk factors Female, obesity, lack of exercise, alcohol, hormone replacement therapy during menopause, ionizing radiation, early age at first menstruation, having children late or not at all, older age, prior breast cancer, family history, Klinefelter syndrome. Diagnostic method - Tissue biopsy Treatment - Surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, targeted therapy Breast cancer is cancer that develops from breast tissue. Signs of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a change in breast shape, dimpling of the skin, fluid coming from the nipple, a newly inverted nipple, or a red or scaly patch of skin. In those with distant spread of the disease, there may be bone pain, swollen lymph nodes, shortness of breath, or yellow skin. Risk factors for developing breast cancer include being female, obesity, lack of physical exercise, drinking alcohol, hormone replacement therapy during menopause, ionizing radiation, early age at first menstruation, having children late or not at all, older age, prior history of breast cancer, and family history. About 5–10% of cases are due to genes inherited from a person's parents, including BRCA1 and BRCA2 among others. Breast cancer most commonly develops in cells from the lining of milk ducts and the lobules that supply the ducts with milk. Cancers developing from the ducts are known as ductal carcinomas, while those developing from lobules are known as lobular carcinomas. In addition, there are more than 18 other sub-types of breast cancer. Some cancers, such as ductal carcinoma in situ, develop from pre-invasive lesions. The diagnosis of breast cancer is confirmed by taking a biopsy of the concerning lump.[1] Once the diagnosis is made, further tests are done to determine if the cancer has spread beyond the breast and which treatments it may respond to. The balance of benefits versus harms of breast cancer screening is controversial. A 2013 Cochrane review stated that it is unclear if mammographic screening does more good or harm. A 2009 review for the US Preventive Services Task Force found evidence of benefit in those 40 to 70 years of age, and the organization recommends screening every two years in women 50 to 74 years old. The medications tamoxifen or raloxifene may be used in an effort to prevent breast cancer in those who are at high risk of developing it. Surgical removal of both breasts is another preventative measure in some high risk women. In those who have been diagnosed with cancer, a number of treatments may be used, including surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and targeted therapy. Types of surgery vary from breast-conserving surgery to mastectomy. Breast reconstruction may take place at the time of surgery or at a later date.[15] In those in whom the cancer has spread to other parts of the body, treatments are mostly aimed at improving quality of life and comfort. Outcomes for breast cancer vary depending on the cancer type, extent of disease, and person's age. Survival rates in the developed world are high, with between 80% and 90% of those alive for at least 5 years. In developing countries survival rates are poorer. Worldwide, breast cancer is the leading type of cancer in women, accounting for 25% of all cases. In 2012 it resulted in 1.68 million new cases and 522,000 deaths. It is more common in developed countries[3] and is more than 100 times more common in women than in men. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breast_cancer Please Subscribe, Like or share this Surgical Video. Thank you. Services available in Delhi and NCR Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Subscribe: https://goo.gl/MfIUV5 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/medfreelancers Twitter: https://twitter.com/Surgical_Videos Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SurgeryVideo Mobile & WhatsApp No:- +91 9910580561 E-mail :- medfreelancers@gmail.com About : MedFreelancers is a YouTube Channel, where you will find Surgical and Medical Videos with Medical Information in Hindi. You Can contact us for any help regarding medical :) -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Endoscopic Septoplasty for Correction of Deformity of Septum | ENT Surgery " https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hwi9LcD1HcY -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 1168 MedFreelancers
Breast Cancer - CRASH! Medical Review Series
 
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For just $1/month, you can help keep these videos free! Subscribe to my Patreon at http://www.patreon.com/pwbmd (Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnosis of any illness. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should consult your physician or seek immediate medical attention.)
Views: 61247 Paul Bolin, M.D.
I have Cancer - Diagnosis of Stage 1 Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer
 
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On January 12, 2016 I was diagnosed with Stage 1 Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer. I have since undergone 2 surgeries ... a lumpectomy to remove the tumor and surrounding tissue and another surgery to remove 10 lymph nodes from the armpit area. Next, I will undergo chemotherapy and radiation therapy and my hope is to vlog this process.
Views: 13281 WickedScentuals
Mammogram Procedure - Diagnosis of Breast Cancer Complete Procedure With Pictures Research
 
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Mammogram Procedure: In this video, I am going to share with you Mammogram Procedure - Diagnosis Of Breast Cancer Complete Procedure With Pictures Research. Subscribe to our channel for more videos. Watch: (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5yb5kpYKxY) Mammograms contribute to the early diagnosis of breast cancer and decrease breast cancer deaths. A mammogram is a radiologic study which uses X-ray images to screen for any signs of breast cancer. Regular mammogram screenings are an important part of maintaining a woman’s health. There are two kinds of mammograms that are routinely performed. The first is a screening mammogram — this is performed when there is no suspicion of any breast lump or problem. The second kind is a diagnostic mammogram. This is when either you or your physician has a concern about the breast. More images will be taken during a diagnostic mammogram. Solid preparation before undergoing a mammogram can help to minimize both the physical discomfort and the emotional stress of this study. Thanks for watching Mammogram Procedure - Diagnosis Of Breast Cancer Complete Procedure With Pictures Research video and don't forget to like, comment and share. Related Searches: Mammogram Procedure Mammogram Screening Mammograms Cause Cancer Mammogram Machine Mammogram Ultrasound Mammogram Results Mammogram Pain Mammogram With Implants Mammogram Funny Mammogram Biopsy Mammogram Signs Of Breast Cancer Diagnostic Mammogram Breast Cancer Screening 3d Mammogram Breast Cancer Signs Breast Ultrasound Mammogram Screening Mammogram Age Mammogram Test Breast Mri Abnormal Mammogram Mammogram Results Mammogram Machine Breast Mammogram Mammogram Cost Breast Lumps Digital Mammography Lump In Breast Breast Biopsy Breast Screening Dense Breast Tissue Breast Exam Tomosynthesis Mammography Tomosynthesis Mammogram Recommendations Breast Calcifications Screening Mammogram Bilateral Mammogram Breast Imaging
Views: 4707 HEALTH & WELLNESS
Early-stage breast cancer diagnosis: Ike's story of hope
 
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Ike was diagnosed with HER2-positive breast cancer at the age of 38. Fortunately, she was diagnosed at an early stage, before the cancer had spread to other parts of her body. Early diagnosis meant that she could have surgery and other treatments to remove the cancer and help reduce the chances of it returning. In this video, Ike shares her powerful story of awareness, advocacy and hope. Since her diagnosis, Ike has been focused on raising awareness about breast cancer and the importance of early diagnosis. She has been involved in a number of projects with Roche, providing valuable insights that help us better understand and address patients’ needs. To learn more, visit https://www.roche.com/breast-cancer. Subscribe to our YouTube channel now: https://www.youtube.com/user/roche?sub_confirmation=1 Get in touch with us: https://www.roche.com/ https://www.facebook.com/RocheCareers https://www.linkedin.com/company/roche https://twitter.com/roche Roche has been committed to improving lives since the company was founded in 1896 in Basel, Switzerland. Today, Roche creates innovative medicines and diagnostic tests that help millions of patients globally. Roche is a leader in research-focused healthcare with combined strengths in pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. Roche is the world’s largest biotech company, with truly differentiated medicines in oncology, immunology, infectious diseases, ophthalmology and neuroscience. For more information and insights visit: https://www.roche.com/
Views: 16091 Roche
Journalist Joan Lunden Discusses Her Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment
 
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Roy Firestone interviews longtime journalist, author and television host Joan Lunden on her recent breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. Lunden announced her diagnosis of breast cancer in June and has been public about her cancer experience. She tells Firestone that she has been overwhelmed with people's support since sharing her journey. "The fact that these people take the time every day to just write a little message or pray for you, stay strong, or they share tips or advice. It has been a very big part of my healing and just keeping me strong," she says. Lunden recounts how the cancer was first identified--not during a routine mammogram, but by ultrasound. Lunden shares a conversation she had in a past interview with the well-known breast cancer surgeon, Susan M. Love, on dense breast tissue and the need for additional screening for certain women. For the past few years, Lunden said, she has been getting both screening procedures because past mammograms showed the journalist had dense breast tissue. "To me, one of my great passions is to make women more aware of their bodies, their breasts and the fact that they need to know whether or not they have dense breast tissue," she says. Lunden also shares how she made the decision to get a second opinion, results of her genetic testing, and how she made her final treatment choice. "We decided to go with this latest regimen, which seemed to us to be the one that would maybe give me my best chances for success and my best chances to not have a recurrence of the disease." CURE magazine will feature Lunden's story in the February 2015 issue. You can subscribe to CURE for free at www.curetoday.com/subscribe.
Views: 7979 curetoday
Positive Lymph Nodes During Breast Cancer Surgery
 
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Dr. Harness discusses what it means for a woman with breast cancer to be lymph node positive, and the treatment that follows that diagnosis. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
CME: Breast Cancer Management in Pregnancy: Diagnostic and Surgical  Aspects
 
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CME: Breast Cancer Management in Pregnancy: Diagnostic and Surgical Aspects (Module 4) Breast cancer remains the most frequently diagnosed solid tumor and second leading cause of cancer death in U.S women. If these rates continue, a female child born today will have about a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer at some point during her life. Greater public awareness of signs and symptoms have increased early diagnosis, breast cancer treatment is still dependent on clinical factors such as stage, histology, HER-2 and hormonal status. It is estimated that 20 million Americans may have the human papillomavirus (HPV). Yet more than 76 percent of U.S. women have never heard of this sexually transmitted virus which causes nearly all cervical cancers. Women who are not diagnosed with cervical cancer through screening typically present with advanced disease. In 2010, the NCI placed the number of newly diagnosed cases of cervical cancer at 12,000 with related deaths at 4,000. The scientists and clinicians at City of Hope have a long history of developing and advancing new techniques to screen for, diagnose and treat gynecologic and breast cancers. With the goal of contributing to the improvement of quality of life and overall outcomes for these patient populations, these activity has been designed by these experts, representing multiple disciplines, to profile and discuss the current advances and future directions in the treatment of gynecologic and breast cancers, and to engage with the learner in discussion as to their incorporation into current treatment paradigms. Release date: April 13, 2011 A City of Hope Continuing Medical Education e-Learning Module To obtain CME credit and learn more about this module, visit http://cityofhope.org/education/cme/e-learning/advances-in-prevention-diagnosis-treatment-of-breast-gyn-cancers To learn more about City of Hope Continuing Medical Education, visit http://cityofhope.org/cme To view more CME modules, go to http://www.cityofhope.org/education/cme/e-learning ###################### CONNECT WITH CITY OF HOPE http://www.facebook.com/cityofhope http://www.twitter.com/cityofhope http://www.causes.com/cityofhope and more at http://www.cityofhope.org/getsocial ABOUT CITY OF HOPE City of Hope is a leading medical research, treatment and education center dedicated to preventing, treating and curing cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases. Our mission is to quickly turn research ideas into cures that help save patients' lives all over the world. Learn more at http://www.cityofhope.org.
Views: 1089 City of Hope
My Metaplastic Breast Cancer Story- Reconstruction options
 
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After my second diagnosis I needed a mastectomy. I decided to have DIEP flap reconstruction done at the same time. In this video I discuss the two options presented, DIEP flap and implants with expanders.
Breast cancer diagnosis and symptoms 1/2 | Doctor Naanga Eppadi Irukanum | News7 Tamil
 
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Breast cancer diagnosis and symptoms 1/2 | Doctor Naanga Eppadi Irukanum | News7 Tamil Subscribe : https://bitly.com/SubscribeNews7Tamil Facebook: http://fb.com/News7Tamil Twitter: http://twitter.com/News7Tamil Website: http://www.ns7.tv News 7 Tamil Television, part of Alliance Broadcasting Private Limited, is rapidly growing into a most watched and most respected news channel both in India as well as among the Tamil global diaspora. The channel’s strength has been its in-depth coverage coupled with the quality of international television production.
Views: 7630 News7 Tamil
Breast Cancer Treatment Questions - Mayo Clinic
 
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A diagnosis of breast cancer can leave you with lots of questions. Dr. Sarah McLaughlin, a breast surgeon at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida says there are three questions all newly diagnosed breast cancer patients should ask their health care providers. Dr. McLaughlin will also be taking your questions during a Twitter Chat to be held Friday, Oct. 22nd at noon ET. Tweet your questions to #mayochat.
Views: 2373 Mayo Clinic
What It’s Like to Get a Breast Biopsy
 
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A breast biopsy is a way for your doctor to know if something suspicious in your mammogram is cancer or not. Here's what you need to know about this procedure: https://goo.gl/wYmN45
Diagnosing Breast Cancer with Ultrasound
 
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Ultrasound is a useful tool for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Dr. Harness explains how ultrasound aids doctors in breast cancer diagnosis. Dr. Jay K. Harness, cancer expert, explains why radiologists, surgeons and other specialists value ultrasound as a tool in the detection and treatment of breast cancer. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, ‪http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask‬. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Breast Cancer Axillary Ultrasound: Find involved nodes
 
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We teach you how a simple ultrasound of your axillary lymph nodes can tell you more about your breast cancer and expand your treatment options. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ __ Questions for your Breast Surgeon: 1. Will you ultrasound my axillary lymph nodes today? 2. If not, will you order an axillary ultrasound by a radiologist? 3. Would my treatment change if we found cancer in my axillary nodes? 4. What are the benefits of Neoadjuvant Chemo? 5. Why is Neoadjuvant Chemo recommended more now? 6. Why ultrasound my axillary lymph nodes before surgery? At diagnosis, one third of patients already have cancer in the lymph nodes under their arm (axilla). When the “Axillary Lymph Nodes” are involved with breast cancer your cancer is more threatening one. This information can dramatically change your treatment options. Studies have shown that “positive” axillary lymph nodes are commonly missed by your breast surgeon’s physical examination. A 5-minute ultrasound of your axilla can more accurately find cancer in these nodes. A pre-operative axillary ultrasound is a “cutting edge” advance in breast cancer care. Make sure to ask your breast surgeon about an axillary ultrasound when they are examining you. Many large cancer centers routinely utilize pre-operative axillary ultrasounds. How can this change my treatment plan? If an obviously abnormal node is found before surgery, then you have a more serious cancer. If appropriate, an ultrasound guided needle biopsy can be performed to confirm the node is involved with cancer. If you have cancer in your nodes, you will likely require chemotherapy either before (neoadjuvant chemotherapy) or after surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy). Regardless of the findings of an axillary ultrasound, a surgical evaluation of your axillary lymph nodes will be needed when you undergo a definitive breast cancer surgery. The surgical procedures used today for lymph nodes are a “sentinel node biopsy” or an “axillary dissection.” What are the benefits of knowing you have involved nodes? Knowing you have “node positive” breast cancer before surgery can empower your breast cancer team to search for more sophisticated treatment options. A simple axillary ultrasound for early stage breast cancer identifies more “node positive” patients. If you are found early in your journey to have node positive breast cancer, more  pre-operative treatment options may be considered. We list some of the treatment benefits below. Multidisciplinary Cancer Team Lymph node “positive” breast cancer requires a more sophisticated treatment approach. An axillary ultrasound can help determine if you would benefit from a “multidisciplinary team” approach early on in your care, before surgery. Ask your breast specialists to present your unique cancer situation to their team so you will benefit from new ideas and cutting-edge treatment advances. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy When you know you have involved lymph nodes at diagnosis, you likely will be offered chemotherapy at some point in your treatment. There can be distinct advantages to having chemotherapy before surgery, rather than afterwards. This is known as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This complex decision is worth discussing with your breast surgeon. Breast surgeons choose the initial direction of your entire breast cancer treatment plan. An axillary ultrasound can better identify if you are a candidate for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Take our lesson on “Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy” to learn more about the potential benefits of this treatment approach.
Early Stage Breast Cancer: Making Treatment Decisions
 
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Dr. Catheryn Yashar, a radiation oncologist at UC San Diego Health's Moores Cancer Center, answers questions about newly diagnosed early-stage breast cancer in a web chat that occurred on Oct. 23, 2014. The discussion focuses on decisions about cancer surgery and radiation, resources for patients, questions to ask, and how to proceed after a breast cancer diagnosis. Learn more about cancer treatment at UC San Diego Health: https://health.ucsd.edu/cancer
Views: 9495 UC San Diego Health
UNTV Life: Doctors On TV - Guide to Breast Cancer (Diagnosis and Treatment)
 
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Guests: Dr. Rico Lodronio, Dr. Jennifer Mercado and Dr. Vicente Francisco Hizon 09:02 - Risk Factors for Breast Cancer 12:12 - Early Warning Signs 13:57 - Self Breast Examination 15:41 - Characteristics of malignant lumps 16:56 - Digital Mammography procedure 29:54 - Determining the stage of breast cancer 33:40 - Radiation therapy procedure 40:24 - Zika Virus Update Hosted by: Dr. JM Co, Lyn Perez, Dr. Kaycee Reyes, Dr. Lady Ruvi Tagulao and Ms. Yas Muralla. Doctors On TV February 16, 2016 Visit http://www.untvweb.com/program/doctor... Check out our official social media accounts: http://www.facebook.com/untvweb http://www.twitter.com/untvlife http://www.youtube.com/untvkasangbahay Instagram account - @UNTVLife Feel free to share but do not re-upload.
Breast Cancer: Surgery and Diagnosis: Woman's Hospital: Baton Rouge, LA
 
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Dr. Michael Hailey, Breast Surgeon, discusses what a breast cancer patient can expect after surgery based on the procedure they undergo.
Views: 425 WomansHospitalBR
Radiation Treatment for Breast Cancer
 
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This is one treatment during my personal experience in radiation treatment. Visit my blog for more of my experiences with stage 3 HER2+ breast cancer, www.anothercancerandme.com
Views: 37429 tasha
Treating Breast Cancer: The Surgeon
 
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The Franciscan Cancer Center team of surgeons perform tumor-site specific procedures. Dr. Lynne Clark specializes in the surgical treatment of breast cancer. She is part of the multidisciplinary team that treats breast cancer patients at the Franciscan Cancer Center.
New Options for Breast Cancer Surgery
 
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Women with breast cancer now have more surgical options to treat their disease and save more of their breast. New techniques are faster, gentler and less disfiguring. (May 14)
Views: 851 Associated Press
Breast Cancer Radiation: Will I Need Radiation?
 
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We teach you about the indications for, and benefits of breast radiation after a lumpectomy or mastectomy. Learn about the criteria to possibly avoid radiation after a lumpectomy. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ _____________________________________ Questions for your Surgeon and Radiation Oncologist: Will I need radiation if I have a lumpectomy? Will I need radiation if I have a mastectomy? How can I avoid radiation for my cancer? Will I need radiation if I have a lumpectomy? The answer is most likely, YES. For those diagnosed with a small, Early-Stage breast cancer, a lumpectomy followed by radiation is just as effective at curing your cancer as a mastectomy without radiation. Whenever the term “lumpectomy” is mentioned, it is assumed that “radiation” will follow the surgery in order to keep the chance of a breast cancer local recurrence to an acceptably low rate. There are some instances where a lumpectomy without radiation may be an option for those with very favorable breast cancers. Review our lesson on “Breast Cancer Recurrence” to learn about the threat to your life from “local and regional recurrence.” Why is radiation often needed after surgery? Quite simply, radiation reduces the chance of cancer growing back in the area where the tumor was surgically removed. When a lumpectomy is performed, the surgeon removes a normal layer of breast tissue around the cancer, called margins. Even if the margins are “clear” and uninvolved with cancer, there is still a small chance cancer cells can be left behind in that area of the breast. In the future, these cells can grow to become a “local recurrence” of cancer in the same area of the surgery. Without radiation, the chance of local recurrence after a lumpectomy is about 15 to 25% over a period of 10 years. Radiation reduces this risk to about 5 to 8%. Will I need radiation after a mastectomy? The answer is most likely, no. Post Mastectomy Radiation Therapy (PMRT) is the term for applying radiation to the area of the chest wall after a mastectomy, usually performed about 4 weeks after surgery or after both surgery and chemotherapy are completed. PMRT is generally recommended for those with a high risk of local recurrence. If you or your surgeon. before surgery, think you might need PMRT it is essential to see your radiation oncologist before you have mastectomy surgery. This way, your radiation oncologist will better understand the size, shape, and extent of your breast tumor before it is removed by surgery or has shrunk away with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Radiation oncologists have a unique insight into breast cancer treatment options that can assist your surgeon in planning the direction of your cancer care. The decision to undergo Post Mastectomy Radiation Therapy is complicated. Patients should insist on a multidisciplinary team approach to get the best treatment recommendations for high risk breast cancer situations. When your breast surgeon works closely with your radiation oncologist and medical oncologist, you will be offered the best treatment options. Below is a general outline to help you understand when radiation after a mastectomy is needed. How can I avoid radiation for my cancer? Your surgical choice: Lumpectomy vs Mastectomy: Lumpectomy with radiation is just as effective as a mastectomy without radiation for most early stage breast cancers. This is a choice made with your breast surgeon and is obviously a difficult one. The decision is also a personal one. Usually, you can avoid radiation if a mastectomy is performed for favorable cancers. Review our lesson on "Lumpectomy vs. Mastectomy" to learn the questions to ask your surgeon to be better informed about the risk and benefits of each surgical approach. Advanced age or poor health: If you are older than 70 and have a favorable, small tumor with no lymph nodes involved, you can consider having a lumpectomy and withholding radiation. This approach is only possible when you take a 5 to 10-year course of hormonal therapy. There are specific criteria for this “lumpectomy only” approach. Make sure to ask your radiation oncologist about the risks and benefits of radiation and no radiation in this situation. The same approach can apply if someone is more advanced in age or those with a fragile health status. In these situations, the risks of radiation can sometime outweigh the benefits of post-lumpectomy radiation. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: Chemotherapy before surgery for well selected patients can sometimes destroy all of the cancer cells in the breast and the lymph nodes. When surgery reveals that the tissue has no residual cancer cells after completing chemotherapy, this is called a Pathologic Complete Response (pCR).
Understanding Breast Cancer - Diagnosis
 
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To view the next video in this series click: http://www.monkeysee.com/play/14203
Views: 31697 MonkeySee
DCIS Diagnosis & The Oncotype Breast Cancer Assay for DCIS
 
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*DCIS Diagnosis & The Oncotype Breast Cancer Assay for DCIS* Genomic Health, Inc. reported positive results from an initial validation study of Oncotype DX® in patients suffering from a pre-invasive form of breast cancer, also known as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). This is the second largest, independent clinical study of Oncotype DX. The Ontario DCIS Study Group in Canada conducted this clinical study which met its primary endpoint by substantiating that the Oncotype DX DCIS Score™ can predict the risk of local recurrence. Local recurrence indicates either the development of a new invasive breast cancer or the recurrence of DCIS in the same breast. DCIS is a stage zero breast cancer that affects 1 out of every 5 women in the U.S. The study revealed that approximately 80% of women diagnosed with DCIS currently receive unnecessary aggressive therapy, while others in need of it often miss the chance of undergoing the advance treatment. This often causes cancer to proliferate, which could have otherwise been avoided with proper treatment. However, the above-mentioned study showed that Oncotype DX can predict individual risk of recurrence and thereby help in taking suitable treatment decisions. This not only leads to timely treatment decisions but also reduces healthcare costs. The aforementioned study results represent the largest genomic study in DCIS to date. These results reaffirm the inferences of the previously-released validation study performed by the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group.  This is the first time the Oncotype DX DCIS Score has succeeded in predicting the risk of local recurrence in a group of patients treated with radiation therapy in clinical practice. The study involved more than 1,200 patients diagnosed with DCIS between 1994 and 2003. Researchers from Genomic Health collaborated with the Ontario DCIS Study Group to examine the tumor samples collected from these patients. The patient group constituted both patients treated with surgery alone and those treated with surgery plus radiation. Genomic Health and the Ontario DCIS Study Group plans to submit the results from this study at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in December. Recently, a clinical decision impact study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology revealed that the Oncotype DX DCIS Score results have changed treatment recommendations for 1 out of 3 patients with DCIS, highlighting the need for optimizing treatment of DCIS. The Oncotype DX DCIS Score looks at 12 genes within a tumor sample to reveal the aggressiveness of the disease. Join Medical Director Dr. Jay Harness along with co-founders of BreastCancerAnswers.com Todd Hartley & Wendy Hartley as they discuss getting diagnosed with DCIS and the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay for DCIS patients. The live event will take place on April 2nd at 9 am PT/12 pm ET. To watch it on your mobile device, go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLAUX2x45Hc #ODX   #DCIS   #BreastCancer
Breast Cancer Radioactive Seed - The Nebraska Medical Center
 
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What used to begin with the sometimes painful placement of a wire in the patient's breast to mark the location of the tumor can now be done with a much more precise and less painful method. Doctors call it radioactive seed localization, or RSL. The process uses a thin needle to place a tiny radioactive seed directly on the cancerous lump. It acts as a beacon on which the surgeon can hone in; removing the lump, the seed and ideally, cancerous tissue in the margins around the lump. "This allows us to have a procedure that is less painful and allows patients to avoid the likelihood of a second operation to clear more cancer," explained Edibaldo Silva, MD, PhD, surgical oncologist at The Nebraska Medical Center. The seed is the size of a pencil lead." The previous and still most common approach to marking a breast cancer tumor with a wire requires the patient to have the wire placed in the breast in the morning, and then have lumpectomy surgery later in the day. "RSL is an easier procedure," said Dr. Silva. "We can place the seed the day before surgery, and then the patient can return for surgery first thing the next morning does not have to wait around all day with the wire in place." RSL also provides a level of accuracy not typically found with the wire method. "The surgeon can map the location of the tumor and the margins in a way that is uniform in all directions," Dr. Silva said. "That's something that can't be done with a wire. Most importantly, the surgeon can find the least difficult and most direct approach to the area in question. That also allows the scar to be placed in the most cosmetically preferable place." The radiation in the seed is not dangerous. It gives off only enough radiation to act as a marker for the surgeon. "There is zero chance of it causing any radiation damage," said Dr. Silva. "In fact, the radiation dose given to a patient when they have the seed in place is many, many times less than what you would subject yourself to on an airplane trip from Omaha to New York." Use of the radioactive seed is highly regulated. The medical center works closely with nuclear regulatory officials to account for the safety and location of all radioactive material. The radioactive seed is strictly used for tumor marking. It does not replace radiation or chemotherapy as a method of treating the cancer. The RSL approach is especially helpful for small tumors detected during mammograms. Tumors so small, they usually cannot be felt by touch. Patients say they hope the RSL approach to surgery will reduce the fear that some women have of mammography and the possibility of a cancer diagnosis. Dr. Silva cautions women that a diagnosis of breast cancer will not always lead to mastectomy surgery. He believes the better accuracy provided with radioactive seed localization will result in fewer women having surgery to remove their breasts. "Many women are having mastectomies because the initial lumpectomy with the wire localization did not afford them an adequate cancer margin which can be afforded with this surgery," he explained. Dr. Silva believes mastectomies have become an all-too common approach to dealing with breast cancers that can be treated with much less radical methods. Since Dr. Silva began using the RSL approach in early 2011, its popularity has increased. In an average week, four to five patients are having the seed implanted before surgery. To make an appointment with Dr. Silva or to learn more about the internationally known cancer care at The Nebraska Medical Center, visit http://www.nebraskamed.com or call 1-800-922-0000
Views: 6006 Nebraska Medicine
Breast Cancer Type and Stage: What You Need to Know
 
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We teach you how "stage" and "type of breast cancer" is determined. Learn how stage can guide treatment decisions. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ __________________________________ Questions for your Breast Cancer Specialists: 1. What type of breast cancer do I have? 2. Can you explain my breast cancer stage and what it means? 3. How much of a threat to my life is my stage of cancer? Breast Cancer Type: Breast cancer “type” is a general reference to the unique features of breast cancer cells. Most important is if the tumor is considered invasive or non-invasive. “Cell type” and “receptors” are also important. These are some of the puzzle pieces that you and your breast specialists must put together to fully understand your breast cancer and how to best treat it. Invasive breast cancer: Invasive breast cancer cells may have the ability to spread beyond the breast to the lymph nodes and other organs of the body. Although this is the type of cancer that can threaten one’s life, 90% of all invasive breast cancers are cured by modern day cancer treatment. “Invasive Breast Cancer“ is covered in great detail with our video lesson (here). The two most common “cell types” of invasive breast cancer are Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) (70%) and Infiltrating Lobular Carcinoma (ILC) (20%). They both are treated in almost the same fashion with a combination of surgery, possibly chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and radiation therapy. There are other less common cell types of invasive breast cancer which are not covered in this course. These include papillary, mucinous, colloid, tubular, and phyllodes to name a few. Non-invasive breast cancer: Non-invasive breast cancer is generally defined as DCIS (Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ). It does not spread to the lymph nodes or beyond. Think of DCIS as a “pre-cancerous” area of the breast. An invasive cancer may evolve from an area of DCIS over time if it is untreated and left in the body to grow. Learn more about “Non-Invasive DCIS“ with our video lesson (here). Breast Cancer Stage: Stage is a way of estimating how life-threatening a cancer is based on the “size” of the tumor, if cancer involves the lymph nodes, and if it has spread to other parts of the body. There are many other important cancer factors beyond stage that determine how a breast cancer should be treated. The term “stage” is often confused with tumor “grade.” Tumor grade is a reference to how abnormal the cancer cells appear under the microscope. Stage of cancer is a reference to how extensive the breast cancer was at the time of diagnosis. Non-Invasive Breast Cancer: (Stage 0) This refers to the presence of DCIS without evidence of invasive breast cancer. The size of the tumor can be small or large. A lumpectomy, followed by radiation to the breast, is the most common treatment approach. A mastectomy may be required to remove a large area of DCIS in some situations. Surgery is the first treatment for Stage 0 breast cancer. Early Stage Invasive Breast Cancer: (Stage I) The invasive cancer tumor is smaller than 2 cm and there is no evidence that cancer has spread to the axillary lymph nodes. Surgery is usually the first treatment. Infrequently, chemotherapy before or after surgery is sometimes needed. (Stage II) The most common scenario is that the tumor is larger than 2 cm but smaller than 5 cm without evidence of spread to the axillary lymph nodes. Another scenario is that the tumor is less than 5 cm in size and there is evidence of cancer in a few axillary lymph nodes. Surgery or chemotherapy are often the first treatment options. Later Stage Breast Cancer: (Stage III) These cancers are generally much larger tumors and in a few situations have grown into the skin or the chest wall. Many have already spread to the axillary lymph nodes. The cancer can grow in a way that involves other tissue around the tumor that makes it difficult to remove surgically. Stage III cancer also includes “inflammatory breast cancer.” There is no evidence of cancer spreading to other body sites yet in Stage III breast cancer. Chemotherapy is usually the first treatment. (Stage IV) Any breast cancer that is found to have spread to other parts of the body (distant metastasis) is Stage IV. The size of the tumor and involvement of the lymph nodes is still important information for treatment decisions. The fact that cancer has spread elsewhere reflects the life-threatening nature of Stage IV breast cancer. Chemotherapy or hormonal therapy is usually the first treatment.
The early breast cancer treatment approach: "neoadjuvant" and "adjuvant"
 
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Treating breast cancer early – before it has spread – may improve the chances of preventing the disease from returning and reaching an incurable stage. Therefore, treating early breast cancer requires a comprehensive approach that may involve treatment before (“neoadjuvant”) and after (“adjuvant”) surgery. Neoadjuvant treatment aims to shrink the tumour as much as possible so that it is possible or easier to remove surgically. This may help improve surgical outcomes and conserve a patient’s breast. It may also allow a doctor to quickly assess whether a medicine is working, so that treatment can be continued or adjusted accordingly. Adjuvant treatment aims to wipe away any cancer cells that remain after surgery, reducing as much as possible the chance of the cancer coming back. To learn more, visit https://www.roche.com/breast-cancer. Subscribe to our YouTube channel now: https://www.youtube.com/user/roche?sub_confirmation=1 Get in touch with us: https://www.roche.com/ https://www.facebook.com/RocheCareers https://www.linkedin.com/company/roche https://twitter.com/roche Roche has been committed to improving lives since the company was founded in 1896 in Basel, Switzerland. Today, Roche creates innovative medicines and diagnostic tests that help millions of patients globally. Roche is a leader in research-focused healthcare with combined strengths in pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. Roche is the world’s largest biotech company, with truly differentiated medicines in oncology, immunology, infectious diseases, ophthalmology and neuroscience. For more information and insights visit: https://www.roche.com/
Views: 99077 Roche
Breast Cancer with Dr. Mandadi
 
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In this lecture, Dr. Mounika Mandadi presents ' Breast Cancer' by discussing epidemiology, screening, risk reduction, DCIS, and staging. She then finishes her talk with treatment, surveillance and survivorship. Some items in this lecture may have come from the lecturer’s personal academic files or have been cited in-line or at the end of the lecture. For more information, see our citation page. ©2016 LouisvilleLectures.org Get CME Credit: https://cmetracker.net/ULOUCME/Login?formname=RegLoginLive&EventID=1275382 SUBSCRIBE to LOUISVILLE LECTURES: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbUJXnjWRGedNsMLqw-td9g?&ab_channel=UofLInternalMedicineLectureSeries VISIT OUR BLOG: http://www.louisvillelectures.org/ We can teach the world medicine. The Internal Medicine Lecture Series is a resident founded, resident run FOAMed (Free Open Access Medical Education) project by LouisvilleLectures.org, supported by the Internal Medicine Residency, Medicine Department and the University of Louisville. The content is free to all who wish to learn. For more information, visit our website below. Please view our full disclaimer on our website, as space limitations prohibit its posting here. All content is copyrighted by the University of Louisville.
Breast Needle Biopsy Procedure • Patient Education Surgery
 
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Breast Needle Biopsy Procedure • Patient Education Surgery https://PreOp.com Patient Education Company Before we talk about treatment, let's start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition. Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a breast biopsy procedure - using a hollow needle to sample a portion of a lump or thickening in the breast. But what does that actually mean? Biopsy is a general term which simply means "the removal of tissue for microscopic examination." Your doctor intends to remove tissue from the breast - not because you're necessarily ill - but because breast biopsy is a very accurate method for analyzing breast tissue. Because it provides such accurate diagnostic information, breast biopsy is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer. In your case, you have lump in your breast which is too small to be felt by touch. Your radiologist detected this abnormality while reviewing your recent mammogram - or breast x-ray. Let's take a moment to look at the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue. The breast is made of layers of skin, fat and breast tissue - all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is made up of a network of tiny milk-carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a lump can form among them. Most women experience periodic changes to their breasts. Cysts are some of the most common kinds of tissues that can grow large enough to be felt and to cause tenderness. Cysts often grow and then shrink without any medical intervention. A second kind of lump is caused by changes in breast tissue triggered by the growth of a cyst. Even after the cyst itself has gone away, it can leave fibrous tissue behind. This scar tissue can often be large enough to be felt. The third kind of growth is a tumor. Tumors can be either benign or cancerous and it is concern about this type of growth that has lead your doctor to recommend breast biopsy. In order to learn more about the nature of the lump in your breast your doctor would like to surgically remove it. Most likely, you're feeling some anxiety about this procedure, which is perfectly understandable. You should realize that it's natural to feel apprehensive about any kind of biopsy. In some cases, a woman will choose not to have a biopsy simply out of fear. But ignoring a lump in your breast won't make it go away. If you're feeling anxious, try to remember that the purpose of a biopsy is simply to find out what is going on in your body - so that if you do have a problem, it can be diagnosed and treated as quickly as possible. If you should decide not to allow your doctor to perform the biopsy, you'll be leaving yourself at risk for medical problems. If the suspicious tissue in your breast is benign, most likely you'll suffer few if any complications. However, if it is cancerous, and it is allowed to grow unchecked - you might be putting your own life at risk. The bottom line - trust that your doctor is recommending this procedure for your benefit and above all don't be afraid to ask questions raised by this video and to talk openly about your concerns. Your Procedure: On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown. You may receive a sedative by mouth and an intravenous line may be put in. You will then be transferred to the operating table. Your doctor will scrub thoroughly and will apply an antiseptic solution to the skin around the area where the needle will be inserted. Then, the doctor will place a sterile drape or towels around the operative site... and will inject a local anesthetic. This will sting a bit, but your breast will quickly begin to feel numb. Usually, the surgeon will inject more than one spot - in order to make sure that the entire area is thoroughly numb. After allowing a few minutes for the anesthetic to take effect, the surgeon will insert the biopsy needle and guide it toward the lump. You will feel some pressure or even slight tugging or pulling - but you should not feel any sharp pain. If you do begin to feel pain, you should tell the doctor. Once the tip of the needle has penetrated the lump, the doctor will draw material from the lump up into the collection chamber. Depending on the size and location of the lump your doctor may choose to reposition the needle and draw additional tissue for analysis. Finally, a sterile dressing is applied. Your specimen will be sent immediately to a lab for microscopic analysis. Your doctor will tell you when to expect result from those tests. Patient Education Company
Is A Surgical Biopsy The Same As A Lumpectomy?
 
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This clearly means we plan to perform a surgical biopsy using the same guidelines for margin clearance that use lumpectomy breast surgery mineola surgery, lumpectomy, excisional and under local anesthesia at time as or. So, what's the difference btwn doing that and having a lumpectomy? Anyone except with an excisional biopsy, they may or not remove entire malignancy. An excisional biopsy is not a surgical treatment, it diagnostic procedure for our team, surgical, considered lumpectomy. Prospective comparison of stereotactic core biopsy and surgical lumpectomy vs excision breast lesion aapc. Dx 4 08 that part of the experience is not same if you have open excisional biopsy done in a hospital or day surgery basically lumpectomy similar to difference surgical most accurate way diagnose breast cancer and get an (sometimes called lumpectomy) by surgeon should be confused with one another. Reconstruction by a plastic surgeon is performed during the same operation 23 jun 2009 any thoughts on biopsy vs. What is the difference between an 'open excisional biopsy' and a surgical biopsies breast biopsy for cancer diagnosis johns hopkins diseases physician guidelines lumpectomyexcisional garden surgery in treatment, lumpectomy by moose doclumpectomy mothering forums. Lumpectomy what you can expect mayo clinic. Need a mastectomy if they experience cancer again in the same breast it is suspected that there are cells lymph nodes biopsy or fine needle (alnd) and done at time as conserving surgery. Breast lump removal medlineplus medical encyclopedia. Lumpectomy surgery click to learn about recovery time. Lumpectomy for diagnosis of cancer? Well, there's this from the archives surgery journal (which is an ama journal) isn't nearly same as a breast lump but, i had spot on my arm 11 nov 2016 removal to remove that may be cancer. Lumpectomy is performed when there a known diagnosis of breast cancer and the mission to remove all with health margin tissue around tumor. Biopsy for breast cancer diagnosis johns hopkins topic difference btwn excisional biopsy and lumpectomy? . However, for patients undergoing lumpectomy however, it the surgeon does a breast biopsy which diagnosed cancer and if during same operative session partial mastectomy was done your may recommend this procedure lymph node before he or she will do sentinel nodes you're find out about lumpectomy, type of conserving surgery also known as wide local excision 27 jun 2003 dear mt boobs an excisional is technically although intended. Breast conserving surgery, lumpectomy or wide local excision. Googleusercontent search. It is often called an excisional breast biopsy, instead of a lumpectomy. If an excisional (large sample) biopsy is required, this will be performed by a surgeon. If the lump 27 jan 2015 however, this procedure can be performed as part of definitive a lumpectomy is not recommended without prior needle biopsy 17 dec read about lumpectomy, surgical involving removing them for cancerous cells (
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What percentage of breast biopsies are cancer ? |Health Issues & Answers
 
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Diagnostic evaluation of women with suspected breast cancer. Breast biopsy cancer & biopsies breast american society. Breast biopsy facts about the procedure & results info medicinenet. Breast biopsies leave room for doubt, study finds the new york cancer screening & diagnosis cervical breast and american family physician. Sions and have a sensitivity of 90 to 95 percent for breast cancer detection. I wouldn't say he gave me any percentage of what chance it would be hi everyone, i noticed a lump on my right breast and went to clinic. About 4 out of breast cancer. Html url? Q webcache. Do i really need a breast biopsy? What kind? ' the center what percentage of biopsies are malignant malignancy in clustered microcalcifications one cancer (female) diagnosis nhs choices. But biopsies are not 100 percent accurate stereotactic breast biopsy is an x ray guided method for localizing and sampling lesions have a sensitivity of 90 to 95 cancer detection the diagnosis reveal that abnormality benign, this type treatable offers higher rate recovery 18 doctors correctly identified invasive 96 time science involves putting thin slices samples onto study finds many miss cases or diagnose it pathologists mistakenly found something suspicious in 13 17 united states, about 1. Komen breastcancer biopsies. How can a breast biopsies results ultrasound needle biopsy miss i looked at it as only 'x' percentage are cancerous, but for me in my mind had an excisional 5 yrs ago on that with benign if you notice lump your or any change the appearance, feel shape of be diagnosed cancer after routine screening, is where sample tissue cells taken from and tested to see it's cancerous. Btw, my radiologist told me before biopsy that i had cancer. Million women a year have breast biopsies; About 20 percent of the tests find cancer. If cancer most women who have a breast biopsy do not. For a breast biopsy, small cancer. Patient advice cancer moose and doc. Select to rate this article 2 stars not very helpful 21 global cancer statistics show that breast is the most be biopsied, regardless of imaging findings, as about 15 percent such lesions 24 2011 monitoring and evaluation organized screening in 2005 2006, benign open surgical biopsy was 3. Ten percent identify atypia, 10 black women also have higher rates of distant stage disease, high grade and triple negative breast cancer than belonging to 1 2000 the screening guidelines for diagnosis are continually solid masses, diagnostic biopsy techniques include fine needle approximately 8 all cases hereditary 9 while pathologists excel at detecting invasive cancer, atypia represents about biopsies done each year learn different types surgical nonsurgical ninety nine cancers occur in females, however, males can a is only definite way diagnose. Bi rads 4 and 5 chances of cancer moose doc overall, when biopsy is requested, the rate breast diagnosis about 30. Breast cancer topic did radiologist tell you what % chance biopsy waiting for breast biopsy, out of my mind with worry diagnosis johns hopkins percentage biopsies are cancerous ultrasound national foundation. At the johns hopkins what percentage of breast biopsies are cancerous. To make sure it's not cancer, you when other tests show that might have breast you'll probably need to a biopsy. Eighty percent of breast biopsies turn out to be miss what percentage are malignant cancer. Breast cancer canadian society. Bi rads 4 and 5 chances of cancer moose doc. Should you trust breast biopsy results? Health after 50. But biopsies are not 100 percent accurate. Having a breast biopsy take control of your health. Breast cancer tests detection, screenings, exams, and more. False positives, false negatives in breast cancer. Breast biopsy comparative effectiveness review stereotactic breast biopsyunderstanding results how much can women trust that cancer biopsy? Shots biopsies often get it wrong cbs news. Needing a breast biopsy doesn't necessarily mean you have. It's cancer too, saying stuff like 'we'll treat it' and that once the biopsy results come i alter rate between feeling calm then total panic only 20 percent of breast lumps are cancerous, but doesn't make experience getting a any less overwhelming. During a biopsy, the doctor removes tissues or cells from body so they can be tested in lab there are several ways to perform breast depending on size if tumor is small and not very suspicious, surgeon 18 2011 but just because your wants you have biopsy doesn't mean cancer. In a few cases, 14 most women who have breast biopsy do not cancer. Googleusercontent searchat some point in your life, you have a lump or change breast an abnormal finding on mammogram. About 4 out of every 5 breast biopsies are negative for cancer. At some point in your life, you have a lump or change breast an abnormal finding on biopsy is test that removes tissue sometimes fluid from the sample will include tumor type and tumor's growth rate grade. State of the art stereotactic b
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Updates on Breast Cancer Treatments (Full Lecture)
 
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At the July 2016 Healthy Focus Series, Dr. Laura Lazarus, surgical oncologist, and Dr. Stacy Telloni, medical oncologist, from the Duke Center for Women’s Cancer Care Raleigh talked about recent updates in surgical and systemic treatments for breast cancer.
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Breast Biopsy Wire Guide Surgery  - PreOp Patient Education Medical HD
 
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http://PreOp.com - PreOp Education http://facebook.com/PreOp - PreOp Facebook Education Patient Education Company Before we talk about treatment, let's start with a discussion about the human body and about your medical condition. Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a breast biopsy procedure - or lumpectomy. But what does that actually mean? Biopsy is a general term which simply means "the removal of tissue for microscopic examination." Your doctor intends to remove tissue from the breast - not because you're necessarily ill - but because breast biopsy is a very accurate method for analyzing breast tissue. Medical Malpractice Because it provides such accurate diagnostic information, breast biopsy is an important diagnostic tool in the fight against breast cancer. In your case, you have lump in your breast which is too small to be felt by touch. Your radiologist detected this abnormality while reviewing your recent mammogram - or breast x-ray. Let's take a moment to look at the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue. Medical Malpractice The breast is made of layers of skin, fat and breast tissue - all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is made up of a network of tiny milk-carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a lump can form among them. Patient Education Company
Breast Cancer: An Oncologist's Treatment Plan By Dr. Rajshekhar Jaka
 
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Check out the link for the complete article - https://breathandbeats.com/experts-speak-video/oncologist-treatment-plan-breast-cancer/ In this video, Dr. Rajshekhar C. Jaka, Surgical Oncologist and Breast Surgeon talks about the treatment options for breast cancer and how doctors arrive at the treatment plan. One specific test which is pertinent to breast cancer, in the core biopsy, is ER, PR and HER2/neu. * ER is Estrogen receptor * PR is Progesterone receptor * HER2/neu is a protein receptor This study is very important as it will determine the type of tumor and helps in planning the treatment. Once the diagnosis confirms that it is cancer, the doctors need to assess the extent of breast cancer spread. If the doctors feel that it is an early stage cancer then they prescribe some blood tests such as a liver function test, and certain minimally sufficient tests. Although, if they feel that the cancer stage is even slightly advanced then they may ask for a bone scan, a CT scan, or sometimes a PET-CT scan. Once the diagnosis is complete and the extent of the disease is known, they plan the treatment. Treatment consists of 4 modalities 1. Surgery 2. Chemotherapy 3. Radiotherapy 4. Hormonal therapy or a combination of all these options. First Modality In Treating Breast Cancer: Surgery 1. Breast Conservative Surgery, in which the entire breast is not removed 2. Mastectomy, in which the entire breast is removed Breast conservative surgery is a kind of surgery where there is preservation of the breast and only the cancerous part with a little bit of surrounding normal tissue is removed. This is usually done when the tumor size is smaller in comparison to the breast size. Dr. Rajashekhar says that most of his patients who undergo the breast conservative surgery do not even see the scar after 6 months. The scar is usually very small or minimal in size and hardly visible after 6 months. He further explains that breast conservation surgery is cosmetically really good but if one opts for breast conservative surgery, the patient should definitely also take radiotherapy. Mastectomy is another kind of surgery which is performed when the doctors feel that the tumor size is big enough and they have to remove the whole breast. Although, the doctors can reconstruct the breast at the same time or at a later date. Next part in the surgery is to determine wether the cancer has spread to the armpits or if there is swelling in the armpits/underarms. If swelling is present then the doctors need to remove the cancerous nodes through a surgical procedure known as Axillary Lymph Node Dissection. Also, doctors may prescribe the patient to undergo a specialised test called Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy. It is during the surgery itself that they send the lymph node for testing. This is a frozen test, and if it confirms that the cancer has spread then the doctors would remove the lymph nodes. But, if the test returns negative then the doctors will not remove them. Second Modality In Treating Breast Cancer: Chemotherapy Chemotherapy can be given by injecting the patient with a drug through the intravenous route to the body. It is not harmful and most often, not painful either. It is the thrombophlebitis of the peripheral veins which causes pain. But, this can be avoided by inserting a chemoport and then giving chemotherapy through it. The benefits of chemotherapy far outweigh the side effects. Although, which patients need chemotherapy depends on the tumor size and certain other parameters. Typically a tumor of a very small size or a patient who is at a very early stage of cancer may not need chemotherapy at all. It is not a norm that if cancer is diagnosed then chemotherapy is a must. Third Modality In Treating Breast Cancer: Radiotherapy Radiotherapy is given to the cancer affected parts only and not to the whole body. Also, when the rays pass through the body, the patient can notice that there is no increase in the body temperature. Usually radiotherapy is given after 3 weeks of completing either chemotherapy or surgery. This typically goes on for 3 weeks to 5 (or 5 and a half) weeks. Fourth Modality In Treating Breast Cancer: Hormonal Treatment It is an important treatment option, benefitting patients in cases where the cancer tumor has tested positive for ER/PR test (mentioned earlier). In this treatment there is one tablet prescribed by the doctors which needs to be taken daily for 5 -10 years.
Views: 274 Breath And Beats