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La forma más fácil de aprender INDIRECT QUESTIONS
 
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Aprenda cuál es la diferencia entre DIRECT QUESTIONS e INDIRECT QUESTIONS, cómo se forman las INDIRECT QUESTIONS y cuál es su uso.
Views: 114156 English Secrets
DIRECT SPEECH | English writing lesson and exercises
 
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This is an English writing lesson about direct speech. Direct speech is when we report the exact words that somebody says. In this lesson I explain the different punctuation rules for when the reporting clause is before the direct speech and when it is after it. You will learn where and how to use commas, full stops (periods), question marks, exclamation marks and inverted commas (also known as) quotation marks, speech marks or quotes.) I also give you some other useful examples of reporting verbs to use when writing direct speech. Finally, at the end of the grammar lesson, there is an exercise to test your understanding. If you have any questions, please ask me in the comments. More grammar lessons: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpS4_AM1c0s0ozpROeE2A9ff Listening exercises: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpRdmnAzmYwdc0Az0ZOG2XNA Vocabulary videos: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpTlYAYSitjwWn29BEdCBi9j Private English lessons & speaking practice: http://goo.gl/w2u7pQ Andrew, Crown Academy of English http://www.crownacademyenglish.com https://twitter.com/Crown_English http://www.youtube.com/user/CrownAcademyEnglish Photo credits: “Casual Young Couple Facing Each Other” Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Woman With An Umbrella Reaches Out To See If Its Raining" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Teenager Girl With Opened Notebook" Image courtesy of imagerymajestic | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Schoolboy Writing On Notebook" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Views: 181853 Crown Academy of English
Direct & Indirect Questions explicado en Español
 
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En esta clase te voy a explicar como formlar pregutnas directas e indirectas para que lo comprendas fácilmente. Además está explicado en español para que lo comprendas con unos pequeños ejercicios al final para practicar. Déjame tus preguntas y con gusto te ayudo Saludos , Alejo Lopera
Views: 56272 Alejo Lopera Inglés
Indirect Speech (Questions) - English Lesson | Part 2
 
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In part 2 of this lesson on Indirect (Reported) Speech, we will be looking at how we report questions, and the changes we must make to the original sentence. We will also look at some special cases. Part 1: http://youtu.be/Vwlm-GoPzJI For more free English lessons and resources, visit our website: http://anglo-link.com. Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Enjoy and good luck with your English studies!
Views: 148584 Anglo-Link
Improve your conversation skills with WH questions
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Where did you go? Who did you go with? Learn how to keep a conversation going by using who, what, when, where, why, and how! Now why don't you take the quiz? http://www.engvid.com/conversation-skills-wh-questions/
Grammar: How to ask questions correctly in English - Embedded Questions
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Could you tell me where he went? Could you tell me where did he go? Which question is right? Find the answer in this important grammar lesson on embedded questions in the present and past tense. You'll be speaking more politely and correctly by the end of the lesson! http://www.engvid.com/grammar-embedded-questions/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. My name is Rebecca, and in today's lesson, I'm going to teach you about embedded questions in the present simple tense and in the past simple tense, okay? So what is an "embedded question"? An "embedded question" is a question that is hidden inside another question or inside a sentence. And what happens is that when you have an embedded question, you have to change the word order back to that of a sentence rather than that of a question. And that's what makes it a little bit confusing or quite confusing for many students because you've learned that when you have a question, you change the order. But in an embedded question like the ones I'm about the show you, you have to change the order back more or less to a regular sentence order. So let's look at some examples. You'll understand better, okay? All right, so let's take this present simple question. "Where does he live?" Right? "Where does he live?" Well, that is correct the way it is. But if you add before that one of these expressions like "can you tell me", "do you know", "could you tell me", "would you know", "would you happen to know" -- if you add one of these types of questions before the question, then you're going to have to change something here. So let's look at this one, and let's look at the embedded question version. "Where does he live", or "Can you tell me where he lives?" Right? You see what happened? We lost that word "does", and we came back to "he lives" with an S, right? It was like it would be if it was a sentence. So "Do you know where he lives?" Okay? "Could you tell me where he lives?" "Would you know where he lives?" "Would you mind telling me where he lives?" Okay? Something like that. The mistake that's made is that students sometimes say, "Can you tell me where does he live?" Right? So they take the question from up here, and they leave it the same even with the tag. But you can't do that. You need to change it. Let's look now at a past simple question, okay? A question in the past simple tense might be, "Where did he work?" Right? So you have to use the word "did" in that question. But in an embedded question in the past simple tense, it would sound like this, "Could you tell me where he worked?" Right? "Could you tell me where he worked?" Not "where did he work"; not, "Could you tell me where did he work"; but, "Could you tell me where he worked?" Just as where you're saying the sentence. Okay? Let's look at a few more examples. Now this also applies not only when you have these kinds of questions -- expressions before, but also with certain kinds of sentences like, "I know where he lives", or "I don't know where he lives", or "I don't remember where he worked" Okay? So even in certain kinds of sentences, when you have that embedded question, you change the order into something like this, okay? All right. Let me give you a few examples, and then you can hopefully understand a little better. So if you said -- if you take the regular question, "How do birds fly?" Right? "How do birds fly?" Well, if you wanted to change that into an embedded question, you'd say, "Do you know how birds fly?" Okay? "Do you know how birds fly?" Next one, "When does the concert begin?" Right? Regular question, "When does the concert begin?" "When does the concert begin" becomes, "Could you tell me when the concert begins?" Okay? So that's an embedded question. Next one, "Why did they miss class today?" Right? That's in the past tense, past simple. "Why did they miss class today?" "Could you tell me why they missed class today?" Right? Here we have the embedded version. Last one, "What time did you finish work?" "Could you tell me what time you finished work?" Okay? I know it takes some getting used to. It's a little bit confusing, so if you'd like to have some more practice, please go to our website, www.engvid.com. There, you'll find a quiz on this and many other topics in English, and you can practice this. It is an important point because if you make that mistake of saying this question with the embedded question, then it's really completely wrong. So practice this a lot, and I'm sure you'll get it. Okay? All the best with your English.
Direct Objects and Indirect Objects Differences - Basic English Grammar
 
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You've got questions about life in the United States, American culture, or any English related questions you don’t want to sift through textbooks for the answer? https://goo.gl/ZZBu8y Ask Alisha now! ↓Check how below↓ To send your question to Alisha it’s simple and will take you less than 30 seconds. Step 1: Go tohttps://goo.gl/ZZBu8y Step 2: Sign up for a Free Lifetime Account Step 3: Ask any question to Alisha and get your question answered in a video! In this video, Alisha answers 7 questions. - What does it mean 'damn it' and 'nailed it', I have seen this several times in hollywood movies. - Do we say: 'who invented internet?' or 'who discovered internet?' - When should I use "too", "as well", "also" or "either"? What's the difference? - When should I use "answer/answered" "reply/replied" or "response/responded"? What's the difference? - What is direct object and indirect object? - Which one is correct? "Why are you not talking with me" or "Why you are not talking with me". - What mean "grammatically" word? Is it mean "sentence structure" or "sentence mean" Your favourite English teacher Alisha takes the questions you've been asking and lay them out in an easy-to-follow format. Turn those question marks into exclamation points and get on with your English study. Interact with Alisha to clear up any confusion you have or just satisfy your curiosity. Not only you’ll be able to send questions but also power up your language with your free lifetime account. Learning English is made easy for you. Follow and write to us for more free content: ■ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishClass101 ■ Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnglishClass101
Learn English Grammar: Reported Speech / Indirect Speech
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Billy TOLD ME that you wanted to learn this, so I responded with this grammar video! Learn the proper use of reported speech (also called indirect speech), and start using great verbs such as 'informed', 'replied' and 'persuaded'. Pay attention, because there are some complex grammar rules here! You'll also learn how to properly use 'say' and 'tell'. Test yourself with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/grammar-reported-speech-indirect-speech/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there, guys. Welcome back. We're going to do a lesson today on using indirect speech. What does that mean? Well, this is where we are relating something that someone said. I'm going to talk you through the differences between indirect speech -- or reported speech -- and direct speech, using these little things called "quotation marks" or "speech marks". I'm going to give you some useful vocab for using reported speech, and showing you the difference between "tell" and "say". I hope it's useful. So my friend Billy, he's not feeling very well today. So he says, "I'm feeling sick." Now, if I'm using direct speech, that's where I use my quotation marks, my speech marks. I would write it like this: Billy said -- with a little comma -- "I'm feeling sick." -- end of quotation marks. But if I'm using reported speech, this is I don't use his exact words, and I don't use these quotation marks. So I could say in reported speech: Billy said that he was feeling sick. I have used the same words here. But look. I'm using "said that" and no quotation marks. Now, what are the differences between reported speech and direct speech? Well, direct speech uses the present. Look here. "I'm feeling sick." "I am" is obviously in the present. Whereas reported speech is going to use past. He said he was feeling sick. So these are how we put some verbs into the past -- irregular verbs. Here, look. "I am" goes to "he was". "Am" goes to "was". "Are" would go to "were". So if Billy said, "You are a jerk", in reported speech, it would be, "Billy said that you were a jerk." "Do" and "does" would go to "did". So if Billy is saying, "I do play snooker", it would be in reported speech, "Billy said that he did play snooker on Tuesday last week." Okay? "Have" and "has" would go to "had". "Will" is going to go to "would". "Can" is going to go to "could". Okay? Difficult spellings. Doesn't sound how it's spelled. And then, with your regular verbs, it's going to go to + ed. So Billy might say, "I want to party tonight." If I'm going to do reported speech, it would be, "Billy said that he wanted to party tonight." Okay? I hope you're with me so far. I hope you're understanding. Good, good, good. Now, "tell" is a little bit different to "say". So when I use the verb "tell", I know whom the person is talking to. For example, "Billy told me that you were a jerk." So "talking to me", so I use "tell". I know who the person is talking to. But when I use "say", we don't know who the person is talking to. So "Billy said that you were kissing at school." Okay? "Said" -- it doesn't say "me". It doesn't say "said me". It just says "said". Okay? So we don't know who the person is talking to. Obviously, he's probably talking to me, but it doesn't say that here, so I need to use "said". Okay? Now, some interesting verbs to make your writing a bit more fluent, a bit more interesting to read. I could use "inform". Okay? This is just going to take -- so if I'm using reported speech, remember I'm going to put it into the past. So here, it's a regular verb, so I'll add -ed. "Billy informed me that he was going to be late for my lesson." We've already done "said". "Billy said that he was feeling sick." "Billy answered with the correct answer." Okay? So this is regular. I'm going to add in my -ed. "Billy reported to me that Sandra was behaving badly." You're a naughty girl, Sandra. Billy has reported you. Now, this one's going to go irregular, "reply". "Billy replied that the lunch was disgusting." Okay. How do we form this? Well, we take off the Y and put -ed, -ied. "Billy replied that the lunch was disgusting." Now, "respond". This is regular. "Billy responded that he was happy to be alive" -- -ed, okay? I'm playing around here. So "suggest" is going to be -ed and "persuade", -ed. What do these mean? "Inform" means "give information". You know what "said" is. "Answer", question, answer. "Report", like, report, give some information again. "Reply" is question, answer. "Respond" is just answer. "Suggest" is like -- it's like a whisper. "I suggested to the bus driver that he put his foot on the accelerator." "Suggest" -- it's an idea, a suggestion. And "persuade" is when you're persuading, "Come on, everybody. Make sure you do the quiz after this. You know where to find it, www.engvid.com." That is the end of today's lesson.
Direct and Indirect speech rules and examples
 
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Direct Indirect Speech Examples | Indirect to Direct Speech Sentences - English Grammar. Also see direct indirect speech rules and examples direct indirect speech exercises, direct indirect speech examples direct indirect speech exercises with answers, direct indirect speech exercises online, direct indirect speech examples answers, direct indirect speech explanation, direct indirect speech example direct indirect speech grammar, direct and indirect speech lecture, direct indirect speech narration Our website ( https://www.successcds.net ) is one of the leading portal on Entrance Exams and Admissions in India. Also visit our Channel for Entrance Exams in India FAQs & Application Process, GK & Current Affairs, Communication Skills Follow us: https://www.facebook.com/SuccessCD https://google.com/+successcds https://twitter.com/entranceexam
Views: 391083 SuccessCDs Education
Direct Indirect Speech - Learn English Grammar
 
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Learn about Direct indirect speech - Definition of Direct and Indirect speech. Rules of changing direct speech into indirect speech, explanation and examples. What is Reported speech and Reporting verb? Our website ( https://www.successcds.net ) is one of the leading portal on Entrance Exams and Admissions in India. Also visit our Channel for Entrance Exams in India FAQs & Application Process, GK & Current Affairs, Communication Skills Follow us: https://www.facebook.com/SuccessCD https://google.com/+successcds https://twitter.com/entranceexam The Video Also Covers direct indirect speech activities,direct indirect speech conversation, direct indirect speech definition, direct indirect speech difficult exercises, direct indirect speech examples, direct indirect speech exercise, direct indirect speech for grade 5,direct indirect speech grammar direct indirect speech in english,direct indirect speech lesson plan,direct indirect speech lessons direct indirect speech online exercises, direct indirect speech objective questions
Views: 33400 SuccessCDs Education
Indirect Questions  | Class 11 Business Small Business
 
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Indirect Questions | Class 11 Business Small Business by Anjali Scholarslearning.com is an online education portal that provides interactive study material for students of classes 6th to 12th for CBSE. Complete with elaborate live classes, multimedia tutorials, interactive exercises, practice tests and expert help, we endeavor to make school easy for students and help them score more. We also provide free NCERT solutions, subject-wise synopses and chapter-wise revision notes for classes 6th to 12th for a thorough understanding of concepts right from a basic to an advanced level of difficulty. Download scholarslearning app from android and ios .
Direct Indirect Speech | Narration | English Grammar in Hindi | Awal
 
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If you get confused about Direct Indirect Speech or Narration in English grammar, watch this simple and easy lesson to learn direct indirect speech in Hindi to clear all your doubts in this important grammar lesson. Learn rules of reported speech. If you are student of competitive exam such as bank po exam, ssc cgl, etc, narration direct indirect speech is required and you can learn it in easy way here. If you are an advanced or beginner, you will be able to easily understand the difference between direct speech & indirect speech, and how we use in various examples. Full List of All Lessons - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLR2GOVaoHO5_o33NOUcvgtFI5IUDInB4K https://www.youtube.com/TSMadaan is a Free Hindi & Urdu Life Changing Videos Channel to raise your Success and Happiness level through motivational speech, self help lectures and personality development class by Ts Madaan. This channel also shows health videos by Ms Pinky Madaan and Free English Speaking Course by various Indian trainers like Awal, Neeru Malik, Suresh Kumar and many more, for students to study, learn and practice vocabulary, grammar, etc. Our spoken english classes help you to become confident and have a conversation fluently when you talk to someone. In this reported speech english lesson, know how to make sentences using narration, along with interesting tips and tricks.
Views: 368340 TsMadaan
INDIRECT QUESTIONS - Polite & Reported
 
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How to teach REPORTED QUESTIONS and POLITE QUESTIONS in English. Find this video's companion resources at http://www.insightstoEnglish.com, including printouts, presentation materials, and further tips and tricks. Whether it's a polite request, a formal inquiry, or a reported question, an INDIRECT QUESTION has 3 parts to it: 1. the Introductory Clause either identifies the speaker (like 'she asked' or 'he wondered') or is a polite expression (like 'could you tell me' or 'do you mind if I ask'). 2. the Crux is the unknown part, or the problem you need solved. It's usually a question word/phrase (like WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN, HOW, WHY, WHICH, WHOM, WHOSE, HOW MANY, or HOW MUCH). For yes/no questions, it's either WHETHER or IF. 3. the Content contains all the details of the question. It's not in interrogative form, as inversion must be undone. Instead, it has a declarative structure. In addition to this, Reported Questions need to go through the same steps as any other REPORTED SPEECH, which includes removing quotation marks, backshifting, and altering the point-of-view words. Formal inquiries and polite requests don't need to do these. ... ... ... [good for native-speaking learners as well as ESL or EFL students] Let us know in the comments how the method in this video has helped you and your students! INSIGHTS TO ENGLISH creates videos and other resources to share alternate perspectives on various grammar topics. Presenting various approaches ensures that no student is left in the dark. support us at http://www.patreon.com/insightstoEnglish see more at http://www.insightstoEnglish.com
Views: 384 Insights to English
Questions' Grammar 2: Difference between Indirect and Direct Questions in English
 
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Learn English Questions' Grammar. Translation Exercise (Urdu to English) for Beginners with Teachers' Resources: Download Lesson Plan and Worksheets for School Classes or Self Learning at langslang.com. Learn or Teach English Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing and Grammar from Beginners to High School Level. For more Grammar Lessons and Practice Tests http://langslang.com/english/grammar
Views: 23 LangSlang
Grammar: How to use IF & WHETHER properly
 
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Learn how to use "if" and "whether" properly in English. Whether you like it or not, "if" and "whether" are not always interchangeable. In fact, if you use the wrong word, it can change the entire meaning of your sentence. In this lesson, we will review the uses of the two words and see how to use them in a way that will reduce confusion and clarify your ideas. How can you be sure whether to use "if" or "whether" in the proper context? Watch the lesson, and find out! http://www.engvid.com/grammar-if-whether/ TRANSCRIPT Hi again. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. My name's Adam. Welcome again. Today's lesson is a grammar lesson, and this is a question that I am asked often. What is the difference between "if" and "whether"? Okay? It's a very good question. It's pretty simple, straightforward, but we're going to look at both of these in relation to each other. First of all, let's make sure everybody understands "whether" is not spelled the same as "weather", like sunny, raining. This is about rain, sun, snow, wind, temperature; this is similar to "if", it's about having choices. Okay? So, in some situations, "if" and "whether" are interchangeable, but the best way to not make a mistake, not to mix them up in the wrong context is to always use "if" for conditionals; always use "whether" when you're talking about two alternatives, two choices. Okay? You'll see what I mean. When they can be interchanged. First of all, when they are used as noun clauses, means they can be the object or the subject of a sentence, they can mean the same thing. But again, avoid using them the same if you don't want to make mistakes. "Do you know if Dan is coming?" Do you know what? If Dan is coming. "Do you know whether Dan is coming?" In this case, they basically mean the same thing. Yes or no: is he coming or is he not coming? You could add the "or not?" here: "Do you know whether Dan is coming or not?" But the word "whether" already gives you a choice between yes or no in this particular case, so this is not necessary. It's understood. Okay? Now, let's look at these two sentences: "I don't know if the exam is on Friday or Saturday.", "I don't know whether the exam is on Friday or Saturday." So here, we're looking directly at a choice. When I use "whether": "I don't know whether the exam is on Friday or Saturday." So again, you have two options when you look at "whether". Friday is one option, Saturday is another option. The problem here is if you use "if", "if" is not limited to two options. "I don't know if the exam is on Friday or Saturday, or if it's next week sometime." So here, although they seem to mean the same thing, the "if" gives you other options that the "whether" doesn't. "Whether": one, two. "If": one, two, or something completely different. So if you want to avoid making this mistake, use "whether" for the choices, use... Save "if" for when you have your conditional sentence. Now, what is a conditional sentence? A conditional sentence is using "if" as an adverb clause. There's a condition. If "A" happens, "B" will happen. Okay? One thing needs to happen for the second thing to happen, that's the condition. So: "Let me know", oh, sorry. I forgot this word, here. "Let me know if you're coming.", "Let me know whether you're coming." In this case, they're both okay. "Let me know whether you're coming or not." Now, what's the difference between: "Let me know if you're coming", "Let me know whether you're coming or not"? If you are coming, yes, let me know. This is a conditional. If this is true, do this. "Let me know whether you're coming or not." If you're coming, let me know; if you're not coming, let me know. So in this case, both apply. Okay? So, again, use this to... The condition. This is the condition, this is the result. Here, this is going to happen regardless. So we're going to look at this in a second in more detail. Okay? "I'll come over if you want me to." If you want it, I will do it; if you don't want it, I will not do it. So this is the condition. If you want me to, I'll come over. This is the condition, this is the result. So your best option is to always use "if" with conditionals, use "whether" to talk about two alternatives. Now, the other common use of "whether" is to mean "regardless". Doesn't matter what happens, regardless of the situation, here's what I want you to do. "I'm coming over whether you like it or not." Okay. "Whether you like it or not" means if you like it, I'm coming over; if you don't like it, too bad, I'm coming over. So this verb is going to happen regardless of this situation.
Grammar: Learn to use REPORTED SPEECH in English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Reported speech and indirect speech mean the same thing: They allow you to express what someone has said. This sentence, "He said he was studying English", is an example of reported speech. But how do you conjugate the verbs? Is it "he said he was studying" or "he said he studied"? Both are correct depending on the situation. Learn how to say it correctly every time with Ronnie's quick and easy chart. Your friends said they watched this lesson. So what are you waiting for? http://www.engvid.com/reported-speech-he-said-she-said/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. My name's Ronnie. I'm going to teach you some very, very simple reported speech things. If you don't know what reported speech is, welcome to the confusing word... World of confusing reported speech and words. Reported speech, maybe when you study it in your class, the teacher or whoever, will call it indirect speech. It's the same. So, indirect speech or reported speech is exactly the same. Yay. Why or how do we use reported speech? Good question. We use this to report or to write down what somebody has said. If somebody has told you something, this is going to be a quote. A "quote" means you copy the person's words exactly. You have to be really careful not to change their words. Reported speech or indirect speech is usually only used for writing. So, we don't really have to worry about all of these crazy rules when we speak. Whew, thank god. So, we're just going to go through the past, the present, and the future. We're going to change quoted speech into reported speech. This little chart will help you. If you want to copy down this chart, take a picture of the chart, I guarantee it will make your reported speech grammar class or grammar learning amazing. Check it out. So, in the present tense, we have two tenses, we have present simple or simple present and we have present continuous. As an example: "She eats lunch." is present simple. This is something she does every day. So if I wanted to report or write down this, write this down, I would use reported speech. So: "She eats lunch." My present simple, what I'm going to do is I'm going to take my verb "eats", and change it to past simple. So, present simple verb we're going to change to past simple. I would say: "She said she ate lunch." In this sentence, "eat" is present simple; in the reported speech, "ate" is my past simple. So, present simple changes to past simple in reported speech. If I have a present continuous example, this means something the person is doing now... For example: "He is painting." So he's an artist, he's got a paint brush and some paint, and he's painting. We have to change this to past continuous. So, if we have "is painting", all we have to do to make this past continuous is change it to "was painting". Present continuous to past continuous, the only thing that changes is our "to be" verb changes from present to past. "He said he was painting." Moving right along. Or moving back, back to the future. We have present perfect. An example of a present perfect sentence: "He", sorry. "They had a shower." It's about time; they smell a lot. So, if we wanted to report this or write this down, we would say... Oh, he said... He... Sorry: "They have had". This is strange, "have had". Check this out. Present perfect is going to change to past perfect. So: "They have had", if we change it to past perfect, we have to change it to "had had". Ronnie, "had had"? Is that true? Yes. This is right. So, present perfect, "have had", changes to "had" plus PP: "had had". So: "They said they had had a shower." And it's about time, because they're pretty smelly. The next one: past simple. For example: "He took my photo." In this sentence, your verb is "took". This is a past. So, past simple, present perfect, both of these we have to change to, again, past perfect. So we're going to change this to: "They said he had taken my photo." And the last one, past perfect, don't change it. It's cool. It's already done. Past perfect you have to change to past perfect, so you don't have to change the grammar in this sentence. -"They had had a dog." -"They said they had had"-that's crazy again, but it's true-"a dog." So, if you have a past sentence, present perfect, simple past, or past perfect, all of these are going to be changed to past perfect. That's easier. "Had" plus the past participle. You okay? Moving on to the future. We have two future tenses in English. Future simple or simple future, which is going to be "will", and we have future "going to". Simple future: "She will go." Future "going to": "They are going to play football with their new shoes." Do you play football? Future simple: "She will go", all we're going to do is change the verb or the modal "will" to "would". So it's going to change to: "She would go". That's cool. "Will" changes to "would". That's easy.
Reported Speech (Direct and Indirect Speech)
 
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MORE EXAMPLES: I live ~ He said he lived I am living ~ He said he was living I have lived ~ He said he had lived I lived ~ He said he had lived I will live ~ He said he would live I can live ~ He said he could live SOME HAVE NO CHANGE: I should live ~ He said he should live I ought to live ~ He said he ought to live I might live ~ He said he might live ONE SPECIAL ONE: I must live ~ He said he had to live
Views: 206560 TheoESL
READING COMPREHENSION in Exams, Tests - Strategies, Tips and Tricks - Building Reading Skills
 
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In this lesson, you will learn strategies for READING COMPREHENSION exercises in exams and tests. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PRESENT SIMPLE TENSE Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWr1HXqRKC0&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ ALL TENSES Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ALL GRAMMAR LESSONS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ VERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LciKb0uuFEc&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ NOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sBYpxaDOPo&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ PRONOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCrAJB4VohA&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADJECTIVES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmeV6RYcf0&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADVERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKL26Gji4UY&index=6&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 Transcript: Hello and welcome back. This lesson comes from a request by Aditya from Maharashtra, India. Aditya says he is preparing for a competitive exam and he has to do reading comprehension exercises as part of the exam, and he wants to know the best way to do these. Before we start, if you want to request a lesson, just leave a comment. In your comment, tell me your name, and I will mention you in the video. OK, in this lesson I will give you some important tips and strategies for reading comprehension exercises. I will give you a reading plan that you can follow, and there are exercises in this lesson for you to practice. Alright, now my teaching experience is mostly with exams like the IELTS and TOEFL, but the tips that I give you in this lesson will help you in any exam situation. So the first thing is: when it comes to reading in an exam, budget your time. That means: you should know how many reading passages there are in the exam, how many exercises there are and how much time you have. In the IELTS exam, for example, there are three reading passages and you have one hour to do all of them. So then divide your time amongst those passages – for IELTS, you might spend roughly 20 minutes per passage. In some exams, one passage might be shorter or easier, and another passage might be longer or more difficult. In that case, obviously, you should plan to spend less time on the short passage, and more time on the long passage. And you should time yourself – if you are allowed to wear a watch in your exam, look at your watch and keep track of the time. If you plan for 20 minutes per passage, stick to that plan. Now, if you’re not allowed to wear a watch, then use the clock in the room or hall, or ask the invigilators how much time you have left. Alright, that’s the first thing: budgeting your time. So now the exam starts – and you have the first reading passage in front of you – what do you do? Well, I’ll tell you what you should NOT do – don’t start at the beginning and read slowly to the finish. Many students do this – and the problem is that when you get to the end, you will have forgotten a lot of the details in the middle, and when you read the questions, you have to go back and read the passage again to find the answers. Instead, here’s the plan that you should follow: your first step in reading should be to skim the passage. What does that mean? Well, skimming is actually something that we do with milk. It’s when you heat or boil milk, and the fat rises to the top in the form of cream. Removing that layer of fat is called skimming. When it comes to reading, skimming means to read the surface of the text quickly to understand the overall message. So if there’s a heading or title to the passage, and if there are subheadings, read all of these first. They will tell you the subject of the text. Then read the first sentence of each paragraph – they will give you a good idea of the overall message. Let’s practice this. You see two paragraphs on the screen, but only the first sentence in each paragraph is visible. Stop the video, read the sentences and try to understand the main topic in each paragraph. Alright, so what do you think the topic of the whole passage might be? It could be the negative effects of social media on children. What about the first paragraph? What is it about? Well it says that using social media can affect a child’s writing skills. And the second paragraph? It says that some people don’t agree with this – that is, the first paragraph – for two reasons: scientific reasons and practical reasons (pragmatic).
Views: 229620 Learn English Lab
Conversational English - What are Embedded Questions?
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Can you tell me where is he? Can you tell me where he is? Which question is correct? Find the answer and learn how to frame embedded questions correctly and easily in this important lesson, which will make you a much more polite English speaker. Take a quiz on this lesson at: http://www.engvid.com/conversational-english-embedded-questions/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi. My name is Rebecca, and in today's lesson, we're going to talk about something called: "Embedded Questions". Okay? Now, many English learners have a difficult time when they're framing questions, because you have to change the word order. But embedded questions actually require you to change the order back again, so they can be even more confusing, unless you understand the principle. So, please make sure you pay attention to this one. A lot of English students don't recognize that they're making a mistake because they've taken so much trouble to learn the regular way of asking questions, that they don't realize that when you have an embedded question, you need to change that order all over again. Okay? So, what is an embedded question? An embedded question is not a question that you ask somebody in bed. An embedded question is a question that is found inside another question, or inside a sentence or statement. All right? So that's enough theory for now. Let's look at the actual reality. Okay, so let's take this regular question: "Where is the bank?" Right? You see I've written the verb, "is" in red, and that's the regular way you would ask the question. You would take the sentence, "The bank is somewhere", and say: "Where is the bank?" However, when you add something like this before that, then the order at the end is going to change. Let me show you what I mean. "Where is the bank?" Or: "Can you tell me where the bank is?" That's the correct way to ask this question. We do not say: "Can you tell me where was", or: "where is the bank?" All right? The original question by itself if you ask it is: "Where is the bank?" But if you add something before it, like: "Can you tell me", or: "Do you know", or: "Could you tell me", "Would you know", "Would you happen to know", right? If you add one of these expressions before the rest of the question, then the order changes back. So, for example, you would say: "Do you know where the bank is?", "Could you tell me where the bank is?", "Would you happen to know where the bank is?" All right? So instead of saying: "Where is the bank?" You say: "Where the bank is", if you have one of these expressions before that. If you don't, then you stay with the regular question format. Let's take another example. "Who was that man?" Okay? If you're only asking that much, then that's fine. "Who was that man?" But if you're going to add one of these expressions before, then we cannot say: "Would you know who was that man?" No. That's wrong. You would need to say: "Would you know who that man was?" Okay? I know it seems a little bit confusing if you haven't come across this before, but believe me, it's right. A lot of my students ask me: "Are you sure?" Yes, I am sure. So, let's look at it again. Now, one point, this happens not only when we add question tags like this-okay?-but also in sentences. An embedded question can be in a sentence. For example, you could say: "I know where the bank is." Or: "I don't know where the bank is." We do not say: "I don't know where is the bank." You say: "I don't know where the bank is." Or: "I don't remember who that man was." Okay? Or: "Would you know who that man was?" You see what's happening? The order is changing. All right? Now, let's take a couple of examples so that you can practice. Okay? I'm going to ask you a question in the regular format, and you practice in your mind or wherever you are, changing it to the way it should be because it's an embedded question. So let's take the regular question: "How much was that cellphone?" Okay? "How much was that cellphone?" So now, if we make it into an embedded question: "Could you tell me how much the cellphone was?" Right? "Could you tell me how much the cellphone was?" Let's take another question. "How old is he?" That's a regular question. "How old is he?" If you ask it as an embedded question, you could say: "Would you happen to know how old he is?" Not: "How old is he?" But: "Would you happen to know how old he is?" Okay? One more practice question. "What time is the flight?" All right? By itself, that's a regular question. "What time is the flight?" Or you could say: "Do you know what time the flight is?" Okay?
Direct & Indirect Speech | High Level | English | Class 7 | SSC CGL MAINS 2017 | Digital Guru Ji
 
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WATCH ALL SSC CGL MAINS VIDEO : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPFWysge9HRCbCYDDZcOhW93 Get the live strategy from our Expert to Crack (ENGLISH) in SSC CGL MAINS EXAM 2017. It is always good to have an expert advise to make your plan more constructive as well as successful in order to achieve anything having worth. This videos exclusively designed in such a way that you can cover up major sections easily and score maximum marks. Are You Preparing For Government Job | Banking | SSC | Railway | other Competitive Examination then Join Mahendras Visit Branch Location - https://mahendras.org/branches.aspx YOU MAY ALSO WATCH THESE VIDEOS:: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiDKcjKocimAO1tVw1XIJ0Q/playlists ENGLISH PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPFo1UjvnFTFgkVG0Zw5QNCM MATHS PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPEqciVVc70WFzIuYPvy-fkL REASONING PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPHWI9gFGyt_VQ2QFkw-tYU6 GA PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPHsYRImGgN2KD3hDuGZ9YZg GS PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPGfOgRGCOerAXQ8z9Z-JzZA COMPUTER PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPFuAPo8JnMaeGyTDsBBaNBs IMPORTANT FOR BANK / SSC / RAILWAYS EXAM. JOIN US ON :- FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Emahendras/ TWITTER : https://twitter.com/Mahendras_mepl INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/mahendra.guru/ PINTEREST : https://in.pinterest.com/gurumahendra/ GOOGLE + : https://plus.google.com/+MahendraGuruvideos 1. No duplicacy or editing of the videos is allowed without the written permission of the publisher. 2. All the dispute are subject to Lucknow Jurisdiction only. @ Copyright Reserved
QUESTIONS:(10): INDIRECT QUESTIONS OR  HOW TO MAKE INDIRECT QUESTIONS
 
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QUESTIONS:(10): INDIRECT QUESTIONS OR HOW TO MAKE INDIRECT QUESTIONS
Views: 124 Learn With Me
Common English Grammar Mistakes with Prepositions | Using ‘to’ | English Lesson for beginners.
 
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Common English Grammar Mistakes with Prepositions | Using ‘to’ | English Lesson for beginners by Michelle If you are a beginner in English you tend to make these common English grammar mistakes especially, with prepositions. Prepositions are important to study as they show us the time and plane of something. In today's English practice lesson with Michelle you are learning such common mistakes with the preposition ‘to’. If you are appearing for a competitive exam such as IELTS, Bank PO, SSC, cgl this lesson would turn quite useful to you to correct the common mistakes you make. This English speaking practice lesson is brought to you by Let’s Talk - English speaking course. Our English class is well structured and each English lesson plan is well designed to learn Grammar, English conversation topics, Improving English communication skills, and tips to improve English fluency. Watch our library of English lessons to speak fluent English fluently and confidently. We have a mix of Indian and Native English teachers who are well qualified and certified English trainers. Study English with Let’s Talk’s - Online English course and take your English to the next level. For complete lesson transcript visit us at – http://www.learnex.in/ ===================================================== Our Social media – 👉Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/letstalkpodcast http://www.facebook.com/letstalkpodcast 👉Instagram – @letstalkpodcast http://www.instagram.com/letstalkpodcast 👉Twitter – @letstalkone http://www.twitter.com/letstalkone ===================================================== 👉Watch the latest English lesson series from Auckland, New Zealand – English Unplugged https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeaP-vXhB1A&list=PL4BuO6UgthvhBSnlvoMe_A-Bo4gveK9IZ 👉English lessons by Niharika – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=skyJpfNHZIc&list=PL4BuO6UgthvjTZUl5oC_Uq1NJXCbrnBiW 👉Watch all English lessons by KAT – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfeKs7ahQTk&list=PL4BuO6UgthvjE3HNjiX2ksW6jydromKHl 👉English Lessons by Jack – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvWQd6v1jkM&list=PL4BuO6UgthvhjDNVmT7IM9lxVD-Vl-NVK 👉English lessons by Michelle – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XPQf9cr0Y8&list=PL4BuO6Ugthvjx0YWu4RHS-KNOh-bh5ZHb 👉English lessons by Ceema – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMp8C77YSHc&list=PL4BuO6UgthviLgmC2kW3dQPTg8MUYv2Pq 👉English lessons by Rachna – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRMTQdkYO2o&list=PL4BuO6UgthvglK4gC3RJXJiyAmtYOqb_o ====================================== Topic wise English lessons – 👉English Vocabulary – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XPQf9cr0Y8&list=PL4BuO6UgthvgLdq2PPXHJB4R3ZiH2MJBL 👉English Idioms – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihWPED210CM&list=PL4BuO6UgthviusM2zZGOtUluJl1Olo2r1 👉Learn English Grammar – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCBkQrNyhho&list=PL4BuO6UgthvjzXaE7u0D0ul2zu8_wJmJP 👉English Conversation Topics – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7I3vZx_pNM&list=PL4BuO6UgthvhBE67P2YmFUPUGh79w6Z7M 👉Spoken English Tips & Tricks- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XwEWta-iqI4&list=PL4BuO6UgthvhvytDIk09zJZqIP0u6--Xy 👉IELTS Training & Coaching – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1v82mTRz1uM&list=PL4BuO6Ugthvijluk3yDSbzONtUCLGg042 👉Personality Development & Enhancement – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5jE46jjTFk&list=PL4012CC6F757342DB 👉Business English Lessons – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7I3vZx_pNM&list=PL4BuO6UgthvgyeE4lhi_1RFoJoSQXmMrI 👉Job Interview Skills – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5jE46jjTFk&list=PL4BuO6UgthvgNZQtMKHl4_OeTK-AjyBJX ================================================ Our Other Channels - 👉Skillopedia - Skills for the real world http://www.youtube.com/skillopedia 👉Daily Video Vocabulary - Learn a new English Word dailyhttp://www.youtube.com/letstalkpodcast 👉Learn English through Hindi - Learnex https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtArm3-faI7bOK-6J-H-SPA
Narration | Direct & Indirect Speech | Solve in 10 Seconds | English | All Competitive Exams
 
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We have used a very simple and unique way to learn direct and indirect speech. Direct and indirect speech can be a source of confusion for English learners . Indirect speech, also known as indirect discourse or indirect style, is a means of expressing the content of statements, questions or other utterances, without quoting them explicitly as is done in direct speech. Are You Preparing For Government Job | Banking | SSC | Railway | other Competitive Examination then Join Mahendras For Extra Discount - Click on Link - https://goo.gl/WIzCuJ Visit Branch Location - https://mahendras.org/branches.aspx YOU MAY ALSO WATCH THESE VIDEOS:: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiDKcjKocimAO1tVw1XIJ0Q/playlists ENGLISH PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPFo1UjvnFTFgkVG0Zw5QNCM MATHS PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPEqciVVc70WFzIuYPvy-fkL REASONING PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPHWI9gFGyt_VQ2QFkw-tYU6 GA PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPHsYRImGgN2KD3hDuGZ9YZg GS PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPGfOgRGCOerAXQ8z9Z-JzZA COMPUTER PLAYLIST : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLPlACV9U2YPFuAPo8JnMaeGyTDsBBaNBs IMPORTANT FOR BANK / SSC / RAILWAYS EXAM. JOIN US ON :- FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Emahendras/ TWITTER : https://twitter.com/Mahendras_mepl INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/mahendra.guru/ PINTEREST : https://in.pinterest.com/gurumahendra/ GOOGLE + : https://plus.google.com/+MahendraGuruvideos 1. No duplicacy or editing of the videos is allowed without the written permission of the publisher. 2. All the dispute are subject to Lucknow Jurisdiction only. @ Copyright Reserved
Direct and Indirect speech with rules and examples, English grammar
 
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Learn English grammar All in one is a free Channel for English learners...
Views: 362159 Universal Channel
English Grammar: Sentence Patterns - What you need to know!
 
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Part 2 of a two-part lesson on sentence structure. What common patterns do sentences follow? Learn the basic patterns of a simple sentence. Review the parts of a clause. NOTE: I apologize for making a slip of the tongue twice towards the end. I said "sentence" instead of "subject." The pattern is subject + verb. Index: 0:01 Why learn sentence patterns? 1:02 Lesson title 1:10 Pattern 1: SV 1:44 Pattern 2: SVO 2:31 transitive vs. intransitive verbs 3:55 What are adverbials? What do you need to know? 6:46 Pattern 3: SVC 7:22 Linking verbs 8:54 Note on terminology (adverbials / adverbial complements) 11:13 Pattern 4: SVOO (indirect objects vs. direct objects) 13:43 Pattern 5: SVOC 15:13 Practice task 17:52 Recall all 5 basic patterns 18:25 Lesson ending Follow me on Twitter and learn everyday vocabulary. https://twitter.com/JLebedev_ESL Follow me on Simor and learn academic vocabulary, writing skills, and more. I’m in the English Room. https://www.simor.org/ Join me on Facebook for more language practice. https://www.facebook.com/englishwithjenniferlebedev/ I offer more videos and free exercises on my website. http://www.englishwithjennifer.com/ View my current teaching schedule: http://englishwithjennifer.com/book-a-lesson/ Looking for daily lessons or lessons throughout the week? Check out Rype and schedule a free trial lesson today with a Rype instructor. http://getrype.refr.cc/jenniferesl Teachers: Please visit my ELT blog for tips and activities. https://englishwithjennifer.wordpress.com Related post: https://englishwithjennifer.wordpress.com/2017/06/16/teaching-syntax-helpful-or-hellish/ ABOUT ME: Former classroom teacher. Published author. Online instructor. I've been online since 2007, posting videos for students, blogging for teachers, and providing different forms of language support. My goal is to make language studies enjoyable and productive. For more info and resources, visit www.englishwithjennifer.com.
Views: 207002 JenniferESL
Language and Grammar: Indirect Questions, Discourse Markers and Making Recommendations
 
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In this intermediate English lesson, I take a look at Indirect Questions, making recommendations with "worth +ing" and using discourse markers - "so" - to help you sound more natural.
Reported Speech (Part 2) - Reported Requests, Orders, Questions
 
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Learn how to form reported requests, orders, and questions in part 2 of this lesson about reported speech in English. Visit http://www.espressoenglish.net for English tips and intensive English courses.
Views: 91909 Espresso English
More practice with embedded questions
 
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An English teacher shows students how to form embedded questions. These questions are either part of a statement or part of a question.
PAST PERFECT TENSE | English grammar lesson and exercise
 
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This is an English lesson about the past perfect tense. The video starts with an example of when to use the verb tense. You will then learn the form, in particular, the affirmative, negative and question forms with the appropriate contracted forms. The affirmative form of the past perfect is made up of the subject + had + the main verb in the past participle form. "had" is the past form of the verb "have" being used as an auxiliary verb. We then look at all the common uses and meaning of the verb tense. The three main uses of the past perfect tense are: 1)To describe the first action or event in a series of actions or events from the past, 2)In reported speech when the reporting verb is in the past and the direct speech tense would be the past simple or the present perfect. Example: He said that he had liked the film. 3)In past unreal conditionals to describe an unreal situation from the past. Example: "If he had come to the party, I would have been pleased." At the end of the English grammar lesson, there is an exercise for you to complete. The accent in the video is a British English accent. Here are some other videos about English verb tenses: Past simple: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ri3QTT41f8 Past continuous: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGwh9BvpE0o More grammar lessons: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpS4_AM1c0s0ozpROeE2A9ff Listening exercises: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpRdmnAzmYwdc0Az0ZOG2XNA Vocabulary videos: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpTlYAYSitjwWn29BEdCBi9j Andrew, Crown Academy of English Private English lessons & speaking practice: http://goo.gl/gOIaox http://www.crownacademyenglish.com http://www.youtube.com/user/CrownAcademyEnglish https://twitter.com/Crown_English Photo credits: "Smiling Young Man With Thumbs Up Gesture" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Business Man Sleeping With Laptop" Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Walking Business Man" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Excited Businessman Shouting And Rejoicing" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Tourist Dragging Her Trolley Bag" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Suffering In Pain" Image courtesy of marin | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Yipee I Lost Few Kgs. Successful Workout" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Happy Tourist Woman" Image courtesy of photostock | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Student And Bunch Of Books" Image courtesy of marin | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Teacher Instructing Student And Helping Her" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "African Male Showing Thumbs Up" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Woman Waiting For A Train" Image courtesy of Andy Newson | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Its Time For Meeting !" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Multi-ethnic Team Toasting" Image courtesy of Ambro | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Teenager Girl With Opened Notebook" Image courtesy of imagerymajestic | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Young Girl Screaming Loud While Holding Her Head" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Views: 610273 Crown Academy of English
Oxford Latin Ch. 39 Indirect Questions
 
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oxford indirect questions - video 2
Views: 1066 VeniVidiVici Videos
Indirect Instruction
 
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Video 2/4 for 3/19/14
Views: 3040 Jonathan List
English Lesson | Rhetorical Questions
 
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In this lesson I teach you about rhetorical questions!!! These are very important to learn!!! www.MarksEnglishAcademy.com www.Facebook.com/MarksEnglishAcademy
Views: 23416 Mark's English Academy
ADVERBS - Parts of Speech Lesson 5 - Basic English Grammar - What is an Adverb - Examples, Exercises
 
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Learn how to use ADVERBS correctly in this video. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ ALL GRAMMAR LESSONS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ VERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LciKb0uuFEc&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ NOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sBYpxaDOPo&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ PRONOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCrAJB4VohA&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADJECTIVES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmeV6RYcf0&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ CONJUNCTIONS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FdEaeD1MdY&index=7&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hey there, in this lesson, I am going to teach you all about adverbs. You will learn what is an adverb, what are the different types of adverbs and how to use adverbs correctly. We will focus on avoiding common mistakes in two areas comparative and superlative forms and then the very important topic, putting adverbs in the correct position in a sentence. So let’s start. Before we begin, as always, if you have any questions at all, just let me know in the comments section below, and I will talk to you there. Alright, so to start, let me ask you a question what is an adverb? Some people say adverbs are like adjectives – you know adjectives (words like good, bad, beautiful, tall, short etc.) they give information about nouns. So people say adverbs give information about verbs. Well, that’s only half-correct. Because adverbs are very talented words they can give us information about verbs but they can also give us information about adjectives, other adverbs and even about whole sentences. Now adverbs are all around us – words like slowly, unfortunately, very, enough, tomorrow, however, always and so on and so forth. I’m sure you use adverbs all the time. But why do we use them? Well we use adverbs because they answer some important questions about our sentences questions like when, where, how, how much, how often etc. Take a look at these examples: in number one, ‘He ate the sandwich quickly’ - ‘quickly’ is the adverb it gives information about the verb ‘ate’ how did he eat the sandwich? He ate it quickly. In number two, how beautiful is Tami in that dress? She is really beautiful (it means very beautiful). So the adverb ‘really’ modifies the adjective ‘beautiful’ that means it gives information about the adjective. In number three, we have an adverb of place. Can you identify it? It’s the word ‘here’ which gives us the answer to the question ‘where’. In number four, we have an adverb of time – which is it? It’s ‘yesterday’ and it tells us when. And in number five, can you identify the adverb? The adverb is the word ‘sometimes’ which answers the question ‘How often’ – How often do I drink coffee? Every morning? No, only sometimes. So here you see all the different things that adverbs can do. And based on these functions (or the different jobs that they do), adverbs are divided into five common types. Let’s talk about that. OK, adverbs are usually classified as adverbs of manner, degree, place, time and frequency. Adverbs of manner tell us how (that is, in what way an action happens). Adverbs of degreetell us how much (very good, really strong and so on). Adverbs of placeand time tell us where and when. Adverbs of frequency tell us how often (always, never, sometimes and etc.). Now there are also many other types such as adverbs of opinion - ‘fortunately’, ‘personally’, ‘sadly’ etc. these help us to express our point of view, and there are also connecting or linking adverbs like ‘moreover’, ‘however’, ‘on the other hand’, ‘therefore’ etc. But the most important adverbs for us are the five that we discussed. OK, at this point, I want to give you an important tip about words that end with ‘ly’ When you say adverb, people generally think of words like slowly, quickly, happily, sadly, quietly, loudly and so on. So it’s easy to think that all adverbs end with ‘ly’. But this is not true. In this chart, you can see many examples of adverbs that have this ending. Also, there are many adjectives that end with ‘ly’ words like friendly (like She’s a friendly person) or lovely (what a lovely bouquet – that’s a bunch of flowers) these are adjectives, not adverbs. So remember: many adverbs don’t end with ‘ly’ and some words that end with ‘ly’ can be adjectives. So, now, before we go any further, I want to give you a quick test and check if you can identify adverbs correctly.
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01 Negative Questions
 
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Views: 184 t. kraisawat
Simple Compound and Complex Sentences | English Grammar Lessons | Clauses in English Grammar
 
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Simple Compound and Complex Sentences in English Grammar | English Grammar Lessons | Simple, Complex, Compound Sentence | Clauses in English Grammar | simple compound and complex sentences HI, In this video we are going to learn Simple, Complex and Compound sentence, those are in trend now a days in exam. After watching this video you will clear all doubts with the help of concept. Watch this video till end and never miss such questions in exams. - DON'T FORGET TO SHARE- Learn Tenses in English Grammar with Examples :- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXZtR... Best Preposition Trick Ever :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - Learn Something New in English :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - 5 words से 50 words याद करे (English Spoken) :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - Narration Full Series in Hindi :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Follow us at:- 1. Facebook:- https://www.facebook.com/officialdearsir 2. Instagram :- @dearsirofficial or click the link (https://www.instagram.com/dearsiroffi... ) 3. Twitter :- https://twitter.com/officialdearsir 4. Google + :- https://plus.google.com/1126392149936... -SUPPORT US- Donate for good purpose :- https://www.youtube.com/dearsir/join Don’t forget to suggest our channel to someone who needs it :- https://www.youtube.com/dearsir -----Thank You for Watching----- Team “Dear Sir” simple compound complex, simple compound complex sentences, simple compound complex in tamil, simple compound complex tnpsc, simple compound complex sentences in telugu, simple compound complex in hindi, simple compound complex sentences in hindi, simple compound complex grammar, simple compound complex in telugu, simple compound complex sentences in english, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences pdf, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences exercises, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences online exercises, simple compound complex and compound-complex rules, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences quiz, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences examples, simple complex compound bangla, simple compound and complex sentences by mahendra guru, simple complex compound rules bangla, english grammar simple compound complex in bangla, simple compound and complex sentences by dsl, simple compound and complex sentences by dear sir, simple compound and complex sentences by jyothi, simple compound complex chart, simple compound complex conversion, simple compound complex conversion table, simple compound complex clauses, simple compound complex compound-complex sentences quiz, simple compound complex compound-complex examples, simple compound complex compound-complex sentences powerpoint, simple compound complex definition, simple compound and complex sentences dear sir, clause in english, clause in hindi, clause in sql, clause in grammar, clause in english grammar by dharmendra sir, clause in a sentence, phrase and clause in bangla, noun clause in complex sentence, clause in depth review, group by clause in dbms, order by clause in dbms, clause in english grammar in hindi, si clause in french, biggest release clause in football, if clause in tamil, if clause in telugu, if clause in english, if clause in hindi, if clause in excel, if clause in malayalam, if clause in excel formula, if clause in sql, clause in grammar english, clause in gujarati, anti profiteering clause in gst, subordinate clause in german, noun clause in gujarati, clause types in english grammar, clause in hindi explain, clause in hindi language, clause in hindi pdf, noun clause in hindi, phrase and clause in hindi, adverb clause in hindi, relative clause in hindi, adjective clause in hindi, clause in sql in hindi, throws clause in java, clause in logic, english grammar, english grammar class, english grammar in telugu, english grammar preposition, english grammar tense, english grammar in marathi, english grammar book, english grammar noun, english grammar in tamil, english grammar video, english grammar apps, english grammar all, english grammar adjective, english grammar and composition, english grammar adverb, english grammar active passive, english grammar all topics, english grammar active passive voice, english grammar articles in hindi, english grammar by dharmendra sir, english grammar best book, english grammar balasaheb shinde part 1, english grammar by unacademy, english grammar by dear sir, english grammar by awal, english grammar book pdf, english grammar bangla, b.a english grammar, b v ramana english grammar, b.ed english grammar, b.ed english grammar lesson plan, english grammar for b.ed entrance, b forms in english grammar, english grammar class
Views: 147086 Dear Sir
VERBS - Basic English Grammar - What is a VERB? - Types of VERBS - Regular/Irregular - State, Action
 
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In this lesson, you will learn what a verb is, and about the different types of verbs in English. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ ALL GRAMMAR LESSONS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ NOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sBYpxaDOPo&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ PRONOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCrAJB4VohA&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADJECTIVES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmeV6RYcf0&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADVERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKL26Gji4UY&index=6&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ CONJUNCTIONS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FdEaeD1MdY&index=7&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hi and welcome back to our series of lessons on the parts of speech My name is Ganesh and this lesson is all about verbs. In this lesson I will teach you the different types of verbs that we have in English and I'll also show you how to avoid some common mistakes that students make with verbs. We will start with state and action verbs, and then we'll look at main and helping verbs, and then we'll turn to regular and irregular verbs, and finally we'll discuss transitive and intransitive verbs. Now before we begin as always if you have any questions at all you just have to let me know in the comments section and I'll talk to you there. OK so first of all what is a verb? Well a verb is just a word that shows an action or a state - state means a situation. And actually those are the two types of verbs - we call them state verbs and action verbs. Sometimes they're called stative and dynamic verbs but the meaning is the same. OK what's the difference between these two? The difference is that action verbs express physical activities or processes. For example verbs like kick, shout, run, climb, stand, sit, grow - all of these show us physical activities or processes. But a state verb is a verb that expresses a situation - for example, verbs like be, have, think, like and own are all state verbs. Now when I say "I have a large family" - here I'm using the state verb 'have'. That means I'm not talking about doing any physical action. I'm just telling you about a situation - in this case about my family. Or if I said "Julia likes chocolate ice cream." Is Julia doing any action in that sentence? No, that sentence just gives you some information about Julia. We're still using a verb - like - but it's a state verb Why is this difference important? And is it important at all? It is. Because there's an important rule in English that you should know and that rule is state verbs cannot be used in continuous form, you can only do that with action verbs. Let's look at a couple of examples. Now we can say "The children are playing in the park" or "Who's shouting?" Both of these sentences are correct because the verbs play and shout are physical actions, so we can use -ing forms. But we cannot say "I'm having a large family." or "Julia is liking chocolate ice cream." Both of those sentences are wrong They're common mistakes that some students make - some students use -ing forms with state verbs. Please don't make that mistake, and remember: no continuous forms with state verbs. OK let's now move on and talk about main and helping verbs. These are sometimes called auxiliary verbs as well. When a verb is used in a sentence, it can be used in two ways - it can either be used as the main verb of the sentence or it can be a helping verb - that is it can help the main verb. The most important helping verbs are be, do and have. Let's look at some examples with these: "Luciano is working now." In this sentence there are two verbs - can you tell me which are the two verbs? 'Is' and 'working' are the two verbs. Which is the main verb? The main verb is 'working' because that shows the action that is happening. Wo what about 'is'? What is it doing? 'Is' is a helping verb - that shows the tense of sentence. We know that Luciano is working now because we said 'is'. If I said Luciano was working, you know I'm talking about the past. So that helping verb is showing the tense, and that's one of the things that helping verbs can do. They can also help us to form negative sentences. For example "Luciano isn't working now" or questions - "I Is Luciano working now?" In all three of these sentences, the helping verb is 'be' or 'to be'. We're saying 'is' but that's just a form of the verb 'to be' - we say 'I am', 'you are', 'he is', 'she is, etc. The verbs 'do' and 'have' can also be helping verbs.
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active voice and passive voice in english grammar . PART -1
 
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Most Important and unique way to learn Active Passive Voice.. Score Better with SSC CGL Tier II, other exam.... DIRECT AND INDIRECT SPEECH https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Y2m7k_1SRU&lc=z13aej5ryujkthnlx22ov5u5xzmdux0ly https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Y2m7k_1SRU&t=0s direct and indirect part - 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-OydmiwQmw4&t=275s ACTIVE AND PASSIVE VOICE . PART -2
Views: 1176522 study circle
Advanced English Grammar: Noun Clauses
 
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Having trouble finding the subject or object in a sentence? It might be a noun clause. In this lesson, we'll look at the dependent clause and its conjunctions in order to write better sentences and to read high-level texts like those you will find in newspapers, academic essays, and literature. This is also important if you're in university or taking a test like IELTS or TOEFL. As a writer, I focus my attention on the many elements we use to build great sentences and paragraphs. I've broken down this advanced part of English grammar and will teach it to you simply -- so you can understand and use the noun clauses in your own writing. I'll show you many examples of noun clauses, so you can see the noun clause in context. Take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/advanced-english-grammar-noun-clauses/ to practice identifying the types of noun clauses in example sentences. Watch Adam's series on clauses! Dependent Clauses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BsBbZqwU-c Adjective Clauses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpV39YEmh5k Adverb Clauses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkooLJ9MWVE TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's video we're going to look at some more advanced grammar. We're going to look at the noun clause. Now, you may have seen my previous video where I did an introduction to subordinate clauses. Today I'm going to look at only one, only the noun clause, get a little bit deeper into it, show you some examples, show you how it works, how to build it, when to use it, etc. So before we begin, let's review: What is a clause? A clause is a combination of words that must contain a subject and a verb. Okay? Now, every sentence has at least one independent clause. The noun clause is a dependent clause. Okay? I'm going to write that here. It's a dependent. What that means is that this clause cannot be a sentence by itself. It is always part of a sentence that contains an independent clause, but the noun clause can be part of the independent clause, and we're going to see that in a moment. But before we do that, we also have to look at the conjunctions. Okay? So these are the words... The conjunctions are the words that join the noun clause to its independent clause or that begin the noun clause. Okay? And again, we're going to look at examples. So these are the ones you need to know: "that", "which", "who", "whom", "whose", "what", "if", "whether", "when", "where", "how", "why", and then: "whoever", "whomever", "whenever", "wherever", "whatever", "whichever". These can all be conjunctions. Now, you have to be careful with a few of them. Some of these can also be conjunctions to adjective clauses, which will be a different video lesson entirely. And you also have to remember that this clause in particular: "that", is quite often removed. Means it's understood to be there, it's implied, but we don't actually have to write it or say it when we're using the noun clause. And again, we're going to look at examples of that. Another thing to remember is that only some of these can be both the conjunction, the thing that starts the clause, and the subject of the clause. So, for example: "which" can be the subject, "who" can be the subject, "whom" is always an object, never a subject, and "what" can be the subject. "Who", "whoever", "whatever", "whichever" can also be subjects. So I'm going to put an "s" for these. Okay? So it's very important to remember these because sometimes you have to recognize that it is both the conjunction and the clause, and recognize it as a noun clause. Now, of course, it will be much easier to understand all this when we see actual examples, so let's do that. Okay, so now we're going to look at when to use the noun clause and how to use the noun clause. So, noun clauses have basically four uses. Okay? Or actually five, but one of them is similar. First of all we're going to look at it as the subject. So, a noun clause can be the subject of a clause, of an independent clause. So let's look at this example: "What she wore to the party really turned some heads." So, what is the noun clause? "What she wore to the party". Okay? So here's our conjunction, here's our subject, and here's our verb. Okay? And then here's another verb. Now, remember: In every sentence, you're going to have one tense verb, will have one subject that corresponds to it. Here I have two tense verbs, which means I need two subjects. So the subject for "wore" is "she", the subject for "turned" is the entire clause. This is the noun clause subject to this verb. Okay? Turned what? Some heads. And, here, we have the object of the whole sentence. So this sentence is essentially SVO, so we have an independent clause, but the subject of the independent clause is a noun clause. So although you have one independent clause, this is still a complex sentence because we're using an independent and the subordinate, and the dependent clause to build it.
HESI Entrance Exam - English Lesson 6 Direct and Indirect Objects
 
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www.hesia2secrets.com Get free help for the HESI test with our HESI English Entrance Exam review video about direct and indirect objects.
Views: 3952 HESI A2 Study Guide
esl lesson subject - object student practice
 
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students practice writing subject or object
Views: 3197 lonestar tesol
Asking and Answering Questions in Spanish, Part 13: Plans and Obligations
 
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http://www.powhow.com/classes/professorjason Practice your Spanish in Professor Jason's Interactive Online Classes. Private and group classes available! In the final lesson of my 13-part series on asking and answering questions in Spanish, I share ways to ask and answer questions about people's plans and obligations -- what they want to to, are going to do, need to do, plan to do, etc. Great practice for oral exams like the ACTFL OPI or for everyday conversation!
Views: 33113 Professor Jason
How to Use Quotation Marks | Grammar Lessons
 
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Watch more Grammar Lessons videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/515799-How-to-Use-Quotation-Marks-Grammar-Lessons I like to think of the quotation mark as the punctuation that can save your job, or save your grade in the class. And that's because we use of quotation mark to attribute ideas and words to the original speaker, so you use quotation mark to show someone else has said something, either verbally, or they've written it on the page and if you don't use the quotation mark, when you are duplicating someone's work; it's what we called plagiarism, we definitely want to avoid that. Grammatically speaking, punctuating the quotation mark can be a little tricky, so I'll show you a few examples, quotation marks often take two forms, we'll either lead with the quotation and give the attribution at the end of the sentence, or we'll lead with the attribution and, and with the quotation. So here is an example how to punctuate a sentence when we lead with a quotation: We have "It's a lovely day" Jim said. Well, in this case notice that we start with the quotation mark, we capitalized the first word and we keep the comma inside of the quotation mark, another words we, we tuck the punctuation inside of those quotes and then we give the attribution "Jim said" and the period doesn't come until the very end of the sentence. Now, in this sentence we flip the order and we're starting with the attribution, so we say Jim said, we capitalize "J" cause it's the beginning of the sentence and this time we put the comma after said and then we [inaudible 00:43:40] into the quota. So, Jim said, comma, quotation mark, capital, it's a lovely day, period quotation mark. Can be a little tricky, because sometimes the comma goes inside of the quotation, sometimes it goes outside; it depends on how you're setting your sentence out. So, let's say that it's such a nice day out that Jim tells his coworkers he is sick and he gets out of the office for the day. Well, I might say something like, Jim said he was feeling sick, but we are skeptical. So, you can see this is taken on a different form, because we're only quoting a small part of something that Jim said, not a complete sentence and we're tucking it into our sentence; so that even without the quotation marks it would read well, it would read as a complete sentence. Jim said he was feeling sick, but we are skeptical. So, in this case you can put a quotations around his partial quote and you don't have to capitalize the first of his quote. So, I hope that this makes; using quotation marks a little bit clearer for you.
Views: 284782 Howcast
Direct and | Indirect Objects | with Examples | in Urdu Hindi | lesson 15
 
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Direct | and Indirect Objects | with Examples | in Urdu Hindi | lesson 15 Welcome to The Majestic English Language Teacher, The MELT is a mission to enrich your English speaking skills and a platform to lead you towards your destination. The MELT is providing you a complete grammar and conversation course where you all not only extend your grammatical skills but also enhance your speaking abilities so what are you waiting for just go and Subscribe our Channel and Click the bell icon. The MELT is a place where any one could learn speaking and writing English specially for those who do not have much time to learn speaking English and also for those who are unaffordable to pay the high fee of well reported language centers they can easily learn English. We will furnish your English with different ideas and technique in order to make yourself a wonderful speaker and an amazing writer an essay or any topics. You could get these all just on one click so you all should SUBSCRIBE our Channel, must CLICK the bell icon, don't forget to share it and write your comments so you may get the update of upcoming videos. SUBSCRIBE: https://youtu.be/X4NVkBoX0Fs Facebook: https://goo.gl/uqQ2sH Google Plus: https://goo.gl/HScGnM Twitter: https://goo.gl/Dn2cUu
Views: 10775 The MELT
SSC CGL | Narration |Direct & Indirect Speech| Anchal mam
 
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Views: 17845 Adda247 2 : Only 4 You
Articles - 'a', 'an' and 'the' | English Grammar
 
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Learn when and how to use the articles 'a', 'an' and 'the' in this English grammar lesson. We will end the lesson with a gap-filling exercise, so you can test your understanding. Let us know how you did in the comments. For more help with learning and practising English, visit our website: http://anglo-link.com Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Good Luck!
Views: 460642 Anglo-Link
Passive Voice - English Lesson
 
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In this English lesson, we will be looking at how to formulate and use the Passive Voice. Join my complete self-study programme to reach all your English language goals: https://www.anglo-link.com Passive Voice Exercises: http://youtu.be/ye3-vJkO0A8 Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Happy studies!
Views: 2094696 Anglo-Link
Spanish Indirect Objects and Object Pronouns
 
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Professor Jason explains how indirect objects and their pronouns work in Spanish.
Views: 234355 Professor Jason
Questions Grammar & Translation Exercise (Urdu to English)
 
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Learn English Questions' Grammar. Translation Exercise (Urdu to English) for Beginners with Teachers' Resources: Download Lesson Plan and Worksheets for School Classes or Self Learning at langslang.com. Learn or Teach English Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing and Grammar from Beginners to High School Level. For more Grammar Lessons and Practice Tests http://langslang.com/english/grammar
Views: 41 LangSlang