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My Radiation Treatment for Colon Cancer
 
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A day in the life of radiation treatment. I have had a few people asking about what treatment is like so I ended up recording it. Actual time is about 15 - 20 minutes. The process is painless but has long and short term side effects.
Views: 12424 snowskaterman
What are The Side Effects of Radiation Therapy for Colon Cancer?
 
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Patients are often concerned about the side effects of radiation therapy for colon cancer. As Dr. Murtry describes in the video below, there are very few side effects of radiation in the treatment of colon cancer. Dr. Murty received his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry - New Jersey Medical school. He completed his internship in internal medicine and residency in radiation oncology at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia where he served as Chief Resident. He has done research and published on the radiotherapeutic treatment of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck of unknown origin and total mesorectal excision of rectal cancers. His publications also include a book chapter on the radiation of vascular tumors of the ocular fundus. VIEW THE ARTICLE: http://www.coloncanceranswers.com/will-radiation-therapy-for-colon-cancer-damage-organs/ LAST WEEK'S VIDEO - The Importance of Learning Genetic Make Up of Colorectal Cancer - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gE_tBCIKoiI SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE EXPERT INFORMATION AND BREAKING COLON CANCER NEWS http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... VISIT COLONCANCERANSWERS.com FOR TONS OF INFORMATIVE VIDEOS http://www.coloncanceranswers.com/ SUGGEST THE NEXT TOPIC FOR OUR COLON CANCER EXPERTS! http://www.coloncanceranswers.com/ CONNECT WITH US! Google+ : http://bit.ly/169ii4g Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ColonCancerA... Twitter : https://twitter.com/ColonCancerQA
Views: 3056 Colon Cancer Answers
Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer, How Does it Work: Dr  Jeff Olsen
 
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Dr. Jeffrey Olsen of Washington University discusses radiation therapy for rectal cancer and what to expect at SNMMI's 2014 Annual Meeting in St. Louis, Missouri.
Views: 8648 SNMChannel1
What Are the Risks of Radiation Therapy for Colon Cancer?
 
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In addition to the normal side effects of radiation therapy for colon cancer a chief risk of radiation therapy is the development of cancer due to increased radiation exposure. This can happen a few decades down the line for colon cancer patients so it is important to be aware of. Granted, the risk it not large but it is something doctors want patients to be aware of. Dr. Murty explains further in the video. Dr. Murty received his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry - New Jersey Medical school. He completed his internship in internal medicine and residency in radiation oncology at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia where he served as Chief Resident. He has done research and published on the radiotherapeutic treatment of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck of unknown origin and total mesorectal excision of rectal cancers. His publications also include a book chapter on the radiation of vascular tumors of the ocular fundus. VIEW THE ARTICLE: http://www.coloncanceranswers.com/risks-of-radiation-therapy-for-colon-cancer/ LAST WEEK'S VIDEO - Stage II Colon Cancer Survivor Dave Maret Describes His Colon Cancer Treatment - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4P5pSgOIC4 SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE EXPERT INFORMATION AND BREAKING COLON CANCER NEWS http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... VISIT COLONCANCERANSWERS.com FOR TONS OF INFORMATIVE VIDEOS http://www.coloncanceranswers.com/ SUGGEST THE NEXT TOPIC FOR OUR COLON CANCER EXPERTS! http://www.coloncanceranswers.com/ CONNECT WITH US! Google+ : http://bit.ly/169ii4g Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ColonCancerA... Twitter : https://twitter.com/ColonCancerQA
Views: 1539 Colon Cancer Answers
Colorectal Radiation Video
 
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The use of radiation for colon and rectal cancer
Views: 5834 Robert Miller
Treating Colorectal Cancer: The Radiation Oncologist
 
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Dr. Ken Bergman is part of the multidisciplinary team of specialists who support cancer patients at the Franciscan Cancer Center. Dr. Bergman is a radiation oncologist who uses the latest radiation technology in the fight against colorectal cancer.
Views: 5961 CHI Franciscan Health
Best Colon Cancer Treatments- Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, Surgery
 
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Radiation therapy and or chemo may be options for people who aren't 2 mar 2017 chemotherapy can make radiation more effective against some it is not common to use treat colon cancer, but after surgery, if the cancer has attached an internal organ lining of abdomen. Treatment of rectal cancer, by stage american cancer society. Cancer colorectal cancer treatment options. Most people with stage iii rectal cancer will be treated chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery, although the order of these treatments might differ for some if you are facing colorectal cancer, we can help learn about treatment who uses surgery to treat diseases colon rectum; A oncologist a treats medicines such as chemotherapy or targeted therapy they also best way doctors better methods early is. Cancer cancer types colorectal treatment options url? Q webcache. Colon cancer treatment (pdq) patient version national colorectal radiologyinfoneed cost of colon surgery in india. Best colon cancer how is treated? Stage iv treatments and side effects webmd. Colorectal cancer treatment options colorectal of colon cancer, by stage american society. Iv) often consists of a combination therapies, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy is not common way to treat colon cancer, though it may be used therapy, with frequently in the some studies have shown good rates control recurrent tumors when surgery 19 aug 2017 chemotherapy for cancer usually given after if rarely early stage but. Chemotherapy radiotherapy (as for stage ii) followed by surgical resection. Treatment options for rectal cancer best practice in treating bowel cancer; The availability of different treatment resection with radiation therapy and chemotherapy before after surgery may be used to treat colorectal. A clinical trial may also an option. Bowel cancer treatment, therapy & stages bowel australia. Ctca cancer treatment rectal colorectal alliance of central. Surgery is the most common treatment for colon cancer, especially if it has not spread. Treating colorectal cancer american societyradiation therapy for colon treatment mayo clinicmd anderson center. The condition of the patient, has recommended it as best way to treat cancer there are various types treatment for colorectal cancerchemotherapyradiation therapy; Clinical trials surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy that been by a conventional doctor hospitals colon and surgery in india is uses drugs stop growth can be used men who cannot have radiation therapy 23 mar 2017 powerful standard care (or practice) all stages crc surgically remove if you early stage cancer, your surgeon may able 3 jan treatments iv help live longer get care, see specializes treating this. Radiation therapy delivered before surgery may help shrink tumors so they are easier to remove rectal cancer treatment programs vary by the stage of disease, and please discuss choice program with your doctors why it is best for you. For patients with rectal cancer, radiation therapy may b
Views: 1434 health tips
Side Effects of Chemotherapy Options in Colorectal Cancer
 
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Practitioners require an understanding of side effects for commonplace treatment options in colorectal cancer. Karon Martyn, MSN, ANP-BC, AOCNP, reviews FOLFOX and FOLFIRI and their side effect profiles.
Views: 938 OncLiveTV
Some rectal cancer patients may do well with only chemotherapy, radiation, study finds
 
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A new study suggests a select group of patients with rectal cancer may do well with just chemotherapy and radiation and no surgery.
Views: 71 WPLG Local 10
Rectum - Radiation Telangectasia in Prostate Cancer after Radiation
 
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Problem: Persistent rectal bleeding 1 year after radiation for prostate cancer. Colonoscope: Use a cap to allow cautery of the lower rectal lesions as well. Preparation: Split dose colon preparation. Avoid APC in an unprepared colon as it could precipitate colon explosion. Argon Plasma Coagulation: 0.8 L and 15 W Find the dependent portion by flushing saline and start APC in the dependent portion (if bleeding occurs it settles in the dependent portion so that as one works to the nondependent portion, the field remains clear) Apply APC to small areas of angioectasias superficially and focally. Avoid diffuse painting. Avoid deep cautery.
Views: 1522 Gottumukkala S. Raju
Cure Bowel Cancer and what to except after surgery
 
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Client is a 53 year old male. This was a Stage 3 tumor to the lower bowel (close to the rectum and almost total closure) it measured 70mmx50mm. In 8 weeks we managed to reduce the size to just 5mm. Without a massive reduction in size a reversal was impossible. So imagine the size of a potato down to a pea. It was done doing a program of 98% Natural Therapies and making his life chemical free. Nothing spread to the lymph nodes although several were removed. This client received the all clear in fact and is awaiting a surgery date for a reversal. This surprised his doctors as it had perforated the bowel wall and there was evidence of spots on the lungs, also clear. Chemo and Radiation pre-surgery as this is how this client arrived to me. His belief system was set in place that he needed it. So we met with chemo intravenously in place. He also had decided to the surgery no matter what. The after effects of the surgery have caused more problems than anything. The prostate has been effected and no desire for sex caused by the 10cm incision running along the pubic bone where the tumor was removed. Remember they take the margin they decide on at time of detection and the plan is made then. Chemo poisoning is still affecting energy levels and it is impossible to have a good diet until reversal due to only having the use of the small bowel. Your doctors do not warn of post surgery issues so ask questions, get support for all appointments and do not believe everything you are told. Research and KNOW you can cure yourself of anything if you put your mind to it. This gentleman has said with hindsight he probably would have continued with the natural therapies program and not done surgery. In his words- I'm very upset about the after effects the surgery has had on me. I have no interest in sex I don't feel like sex and if I was they had told that could be a side effect after surgery I may have not gone ahead with it, I feel that I was only told a small amount of information by the doctors and that really pissed me off. who wants to be with a guy who has no interest in sex?? This is what to except after bowel surgery and how a bag change works. I am Paula Langford. I have been a Natural Health Therapist for 25 years. I specialise in "CANCER CONSULTING" The cost involved in this case over the 12 weeks (pre and post surgery) was my initial AU$3000 consultation and 2 days spent with me in Cairns Australia. Approximately $600 a week on the supplements and other therapies at own cost as advised by me. $500 consultation follow-ups for program updates and changes. Accommodation at own cost but certainly happy to help with bookings and transportation. Live the Life you deserve and Cancer does not have to be a death sentence! You can at the very least extend you life with your loved ones. LOVE & GRATITUDE FOR WATCHING. PLEASE SHARE.
Views: 9178 Paula Langford
1st Radiation Treatment
 
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This was my 1st treatment for rectal cancer
Views: 29 Katrina Fuqua
Rectal Cancer | Q&A
 
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Johns Hopkins colorectal surgeon Jonathan Efron answers important questions about rectal cancer, including minimally invasive surgical treatment options, advances in treatment of recurrent rectal cancer and consideration for genetic testing. To learn more about colon and rectal cancer visit: http://ow.ly/N0D3e
Views: 31173 Johns Hopkins Medicine
Rectal Cancer Treatment
 
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MSKCC experts explain how chemotherapy and radiation therapy can be used to shrink rectal tumors before surgically removing them.
Side Effects of Chemo for Colon Cancer
 
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When speaking about colon cancer treatment, it's important to discuss some of the side effects that come with treatment, particularly chemotherapy. Dr. Dayyani discusses these side effects and how modern medicine has learned to manage the side effects. LAST WEEK'S VIDEO - What Happens If I Don't Treat My Colon Cancer? http://youtu.be/cSEvt3umnZI SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE EXPERT INFORMATION AND BREAKING COLON CANCER NEWS http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=coloncancerdr VISIT COLONCANCERANSWERS.com FOR TONS OF INFORMATIVE VIDEOS http://www.coloncanceranswers.com/ SUGGEST THE NEXT TOPIC FOR OUR COLON CANCER EXPERTS! http://www.coloncanceranswers.com/ CONNECT WITH US! Google+ : http://bit.ly/169ii4g Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ColonCancerAnswers Twitter : https://twitter.com/ColonCancerQA ______ Disclaimer: This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk. If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Views: 23683 Colon Cancer Answers
Colon Cancer Treatment
 
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Treatment for colon cancer now includes many new options available to control even advanced disease. In this video, Stanford’s colon cancer treatment experts explain the four stages of colon cancer and the treatment approach for each one. They also share information about new types of surgery that include reconstruction after the removal of a tumor and the new availability of chemotherapy targeted to the genetics of a tumor and combined with new biologic medications.
Views: 14364 Stanford Health Care
How Radiation Therapy Works/What are the side effects of radiation treatment for cancer/
 
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Ravi Shines Tamil :Doctors called radiation oncologists oversee radiation therapy / Radiation Therapy Basics - American Cancer Society.
Views: 2899 Ravi Shines Tamil
Rectal Cancer
 
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Rectal cancer is the growth of abnormal cancerous cells in the lower part of the colon. Symptoms can include a change in bowel habits, such as diarrhea or constipation, rectal bleeding, stomachache, loss of appetite, weight loss, and fatigue. Treatment is based largely on the stage of the cancer “Once we know what the stage is, if they need chemo and radiation then we prefer to get them up front. They get the chemo/radiation, we wait for six weeks, then we do the surgery and after that then they get more chemo,” says Dr. Janette Gaw, a colorectal surgeon on the Lee Memorial Health System medical staff. The American Cancer Society estimates about 40,000 new cases of rectal cancer will occur this year. You’re more likely to develop rectal cancer if you have a history of colon polyps or a family history of colorectal cancer. Other risk factors include being over 50, having previous colorectal cancer, or – for women – previous cancer of the ovaries, breast, or lining of the uterus. “In our community we’re very fortunate, we have a very, very good relationship with gastroenterologist, the oncologist and the radiation oncologist. We coordinate the care very quickly so that people can get seen, evaluated, and a plan is made amongst the team and then we move on with the plan,” says Dr. Gaw. There are typically four standard treatments for rectal cancer: surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and targeted therapy. The team approach to treatment has been proven to lead to a more positive prognosis for the patient. “It definitely enhances the outcome, that has been proven. A team that works together makes your outcome better,” says Dr. Gaw. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org
Views: 1848 Lee Health
What are the roles of radiation and chemotherapy in treating colorectal cancer?
 
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MCI’s Dr. Clay Smith describes how chemotherapy and radiation are used to treat colon and rectal cancers.
Treatment Options for Rectal Cancer | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn more about our colorectal cancer treatments http://www.mskcc.org/colorectalcancer Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering At Memorial Sloan Kettering, radiation therapy and chemotherapy are often used in rectal cancer treatment to shrink tumors before they are removed surgically. This can help to minimize side effects of treatment. Memorial Sloan Kettering physicians treat a high number of people with rectal cancer each year. {partial transcript} Speaking of anatomy, the differences between colon cancer and rectal cancer, what are some of the issues that come into play? There are some side effects that may come as a result of surgery on rectal cancer? Yes, as pointed out by Dr. Saltz and as you have alluded to with the anatomy – imagine the abdominal cavity being more-or-less a watermelon; when we e are operating in the abdomen, we are operating in the pope, the pink part of that abdomen. As you narrow down into the male pelvis it is usually more challenging. In contradistinction to a women’s wider pelvis, the male pelvis is far narrower and is surrounded by vessels that perfuse the legs, nerves that are important for bladder and sexual function. It’s an intimate narrowed space, as pointed out by Leonard. What’s required is that appreciation, level of training, and high volume that is required to do that procedure well. We know for many large experiences world wide, that the first time, the approach has to be done perfectly.
Location Matters with Colorectal Cancer
 
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Location, location, location. As with many things, it counts when it comes to colorectal cancer. Disease that affects the lower GI tract is divided into colon and rectal cancer. They are treated differently based on location. “Colon cancer is a bit more straightforward. Usually you just take it out and if the lymph nodes are positive then you get chemo,” says Dr. Janette Gaw, who is a colorectal surgeon on medical staff of Lee Memorial Health System. Ken Lemme learned firsthand. A large tumor in his colon reached down to the rectum; requiring extra steps to treatment. “I started radiation treatments in December. I had 28 treatments and February 17th I was in the hospital doing surgery,” says Lemme. When treating rectal cancer, radiation and chemo typically come first. Followed by surgery and many times, more chemo. “I am in the end of that segment now. I’ve got two more weeks of chemotherapy,” says Lemme. Rectal cancer has deeper implications because the lower GI tract is situated inside the pelvis. A small space, it makes getting clear margins during surgery more difficult. Undergoing treatment first leads to greater success. “Chemo and radiation, when you receive it beforehand it helps with the surgery because it shrinks the tumor and also decreases the local recurrence,” says Dr. Gaw. Historically, patients with rectal cancer faced a permanent colostomy. Now it is often a temporary state. “Once that area heals then we just reverse them and so they can go to the bathroom normally,” says Dr. Gaw. “I was lucky enough to be where I am and able to get it early enough and to be able to move on,” says Lemme. A tough diagnosis, with the right approach to treatment, rectal cancer still has good outcomes. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we’ve been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org
Views: 183 Lee Health
Using Radiation to Treat Colorectal Cancers Metastasized to the Liver with Dr. Kennedy
 
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Sarah Cannon Radiation Oncology Physician-in-Chief Andrew Kennedy, MD, discusses metastatic colorectal cancer in this web chat recorded on April 2nd. Topics include difficulties of treating mCRC; treatment options, including Selective Internal Radiation Treatment (SIRT); imaging insights; response and survival rates, treatment safety and impact on quality of life; considerations for patients over the age of 70; and side effects of interventional oncology treatment/imaging. This web chat is sponsored by Sirtex Medical Inc.
Views: 1442 OMNIConnect
Fighting Cancer after 6 weeks of chemo and radiation.
 
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This is a video journal of my fight of rectal cancer. I will be on 5 weeks of chemo and radiation. My chemo is Capecitabine (Xeloda). Radiation is external. This is my first time doing a video journal, pardon my rookiness. This is a couple weeks after my treatments. Took me alot of time ot get the energy to sit and do this video. I was really lost for words. Kinda didn't know what to say, but wanted to check in and show I made it through. Will give an update when I get news at the end of February.
Views: 1393 dolphyn2
Colorectal Cancer Treatments & Quality of Life | Memorial Sloan Kettering
 
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Learn more about our colorectal cancer treatments http://www.mskcc.org/colorectalcancer Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sloankettering Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/sloan_kettering Patients' quality of life after treatment should be an important factor that doctors consider when deciding on a course of treatment for colorectal cancer. In this video, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experts address issues such as ways to avoid the need for a colostomy, preserve female patients' sexual function, and prevent other side effects of colorectal cancer treatment. {partial transcript} I think it’s clear that whether you have radiation therapy, chemotherapy or any combination thereof, it is a difficult process for people. Can we talk about the quality of life and how that fits within the decision making process as to what might be the right course of treatment that might be? I’m particularly interested in quality of life and late effects after treatment – particularly after radiation therapy. However, I think in terms of the decision-making initially – about the course of treatment the patient will take on – is dependent upon the cure of the cancer and the quality of life. In the end, we would like to maintain the quality of life. I do believe one of the things radiation therapy can do, if given preoperatively, it can hopefully make it easier to allow a patient with a very low-lying rectal cancer where there is a very high risk of having to remove the rectum and anus and end up with a colostomy. In many cases, we are able to allow for the tumor to shrink. This allows for Dr. Guillem to do a surgery where he can actually put things back together again and not end up with the colostomy
Young colon cancer Chemo Pt. 1
 
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🙋🏼Hi My name is Heidi & I was diagnosed with stage lll colon cancer at the age of 26. I start chemotherapy in 1 week with hopes to be cancer free in time for my wedding in May 2017! I will be vlogging my entire journey.. Keep faith and carry on! Stay tuned for more updates, videos & photos! Kicking cancers butt while sayin' yes to the dress! 👰🏼🎗👊🏼
Views: 7184 Heidi Manger
Treatment of rectal cancer by stage
 
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Stage 0 At this stage the cancer has not grown beyond the inner lining of the rectum. Removing or destroying the cancer is all that is needed. You can usually be treated with a polypectomy (removing the polyp), local excision, or transanal resection and should need no further treatment. Stage I In this stage, the cancer has grown through the first layer of the rectum into deeper layers but has not spread outside the wall of the rectum itself. Stage I includes cancers that were part of a polyp. If the polyp is removed completely, with no cancer in the edges, no other treatment may be needed. If the cancer in the polyp was high grade (see “How is colorectal cancer staged?”) or there were cancer cells at the edges of the polyp, more surgery may be advised. More surgery may also be advised if the polyp couldn’t be removed completely or if it had to be removed in many pieces, making it hard to see if there were cancer cells at the edges (margins). For other stage I cancers, surgery is usually the main treatment. Either a low anterior resection (LAR), proctectomy with colo-anal anastomosis, or an abdominoperineal resection (APR) may be done, depending on exactly where the cancer is found within the rectum (these were discussed in detail in the surgery section). Additional therapy is not needed after these operations, unless the surgeon finds the cancer is more advanced than was thought before surgery. If it is more advanced, a combination of chemo and radiation therapy is usually given. For some small T1 stage I rectal cancers, another option may be removing them through the anus without an abdominal incision (transanal resection or transanal endoscopic microsurgery). If the tumor turns out to have high-risk features (such as a worrisome appearance under the microscope or if cancer is found at the edges of the removed specimen), another surgery, such as those used to treat stage II cancers, may be advised. In some cases, adjuvant chemoradiation (treatment with radiation and chemo together) is advised for patients having such surgery. 5-FU is the chemo drug most often used. If you are too sick to have surgery, you may be treated with radiation therapy. However, this has not been proven to be as effective as surgery. Stage II Many of these cancers have grown through the wall of the rectum and may extend into nearby tissues. They have not yet spread to the lymph nodes. Stage II rectal cancers are usually treated with surgery such as a low anterior resection, proctectomy with colo-anal anastomosis, or abdominoperineal resection (depending on where the cancer is in the rectum), along with both chemo and radiation therapy. Most doctors now favor giving the radiation therapy along with chemo before surgery (neoadjuvant treatment), and then giving additional chemo after surgery, usually for a total of 6 months of treatment (including the time getting chemo and radiation together). The chemo given with radiation is usually either 5-FU or capecitabine (Xeloda). The chemo after surgery may be the FOLFOX regimen (oxaliplatin, 5-FU, and leucovorin), 5-FU and leucovorin, CapeOx (capecitabine plus oxaliplatin) or capecitabine alone, based on what's best suited to your health needs. If neoadjuvant therapy shrinks the tumor enough, sometimes a transanal full-thickness rectal resection can be done instead of a more invasive low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection. This may allow the patient to avoid a colostomy. A problem with using this procedure is that it doesn't allow the surgeon to see if the cancer has spread to your lymph nodes or further in your pelvis. For this reason, the procedure generally isn't recommended. Stage III These cancers have spread to nearby lymph nodes but not to other parts of the body. watch full video for more Vastu & Astrology : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbhc-xEKXBrPHPevA2ibJxQ Dharm अाैर Science : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_7ylmMqDS92eLK6NY76Y6w Difference & Similarities : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTIp54Q_dyw1o2etqsoeXiw What If ….कया हो अगर : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnsIAaPFcrUdOAtAJ3fokEA Parenting & Lifestyle : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChx9OYduRzQsdvyQBRIAq8A Shrimad Home Remedies : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3oHEjYN8K8eSH2LDq--5eQ Ghar Ka Khana : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTnETM8SXLVChvnf6wAfyxg Teej Tyohar - https://c.mp.ucweb.com/personal/index/58f59d88bae5476db984a49f3e5b5a8a?uc Guru Ka Gyan - https://c.mp.ucweb.com/personal/index/d4fd204f35014a458bb80deacbb4a925?uc Shreemad Home Remidies - https://c.mp.ucweb.com/personal/index/1ad6051206a446739f7e4fbf6f72035c?uc Ghar Ka Khana - https://c.mp.ucweb.com/personal/index/93f4321fdb504bec8e7ed24ae784b728?uc
Views: 25124 Gyan-The Treasure
What Are the Side Effects of Radiation Treatment?
 
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What side effects can a cancer patient expect from radiation treatment? Dr. Simon Fung-Kee-Fung describes some of the common side effects that may occur and how the Roswell Park team works to mitigate these effects as much as possible. Learn more at our blog: https://goo.gl/FAWFw3
Late effects of pelvic radiotherapy - Macmillan Cancer Support
 
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This cancer information video explores the late effects of radiotherapy to the pelvic area. It gives advice on what you might expect after treatment and how to deal with the symptoms in the long term. For more information about pelvic radiotherapy, visit: http://www.macmillan.org.uk/information-and-support/treating/radiotherapy/pelvic-radiotherapy-explained Subscribe: http://bit.ly/UsAbto Twitter: https://twitter.com/macmillancancer Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/macmillancancer This video was correct as of 1 August 2015.
Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer, Evolution and Current Status
 
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This expert lecture by Prof Arthur Sun Myint of Clatterbirdge Cancer Centre, Liverpool is a masterclass related to local contact radiotherapy for rectal cancer. This niche treatment for rectum conservation in patients with small tumors is known as the Papillion technique. The lecture was given at a recent symposium hosted by the Mater Private Hospital (MPH) in conjunction with MMUH. For further details of this technique, which is available for patients in Ireland via MPH and MMUH, please see http://www.clatterbridgecc.nhs.uk/patients/treatment-and-support/papillon MMUH is a major surgical teaching and training hospital in Dublin as well as being one of Ireland's leading surgical centres in the fields of complex elective surgery, trauma and emergency surgery and adult cancer surgery. Click SUBSCRIBE for the latest content!
Anal and Rectal Cancer Care and Treatment
 
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Lindsay B. Romak, M.D., Radiation Oncologist at Christiana Care's Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute, talks about anal and rectal cancer care and treatment.
Views: 3647 Christiana Care
Radiation for Rectal Cancer with Radiation Oncologist Kelly Orwat
 
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Kelly Orwat, radiation oncologist, discusses radiation treatment and rectal cancer. Dr. Orwat also discussed candidacy for treatment and benefits of using radiation. To learn more about Dr. Orwat visit https://www.medstarhealth.org/doctor/dr-kelly-e-orwat-md.
Views: 115 MedStar Health
Colon Cancer: Diagnosis & Treatment | Los Angeles Colonoscopy
 
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http://www.laendo.net/ Dr. Paul M. Choi. Treatment of colon cancer is reviewed including the diagnosis, the pre-operative evaluation, as well as treatment options available including surgery, chemotherapy and targeted therapy. A detailed review of the information provided by the American Cancer Society can be followed in the following link: http://www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/detailedguide/colorectal-cancer-survival-rates This video was prepared by the Los Angeles Endoscopy Center.
Radiation Therapy for Cancer | Types, Advancements and cost  - Hindi
 
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Watch to know about the radiation therapy, treatment, precautions and side effects of cancers like brain tumor, prostate cancer, lung cancer etc. He gives a brief on the techniques used in radiation therapy like IMRT, IGRT & VMAT which can cure lung cancer and other cancers. There are side effects also in the treatment of cancers involving radiation therapy. So before going for radiation therapy in the procedure of treatment, one should consult with a team of doctors in detail. Cost of radiation therapy varies on the type of cancer, treatment and other factors. Like, Share and Comment. Subscribe to our channel for more Healthcare Information and Update Videos India's Number 1 Medical Assistance Company for Surgery or Treatment. Credihealth has the largest network of hospitals in the country. We help you find best doctors from top hospitals, book online appointment and compare surgery prices in Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai and other cities. Visit Credihealth - https://www.credihealth.com/ Stay updated with all the happenings at Credihealth - Facebook https://www.facebook.com/credihealth Twitter https://twitter.com/credihealth Google https://plus.google.com/+Credihealth LinkedIN https://in.linkedin.com/company/credihealth
Views: 39378 credihealth
Is Radiation Therapy a Substitute for Chemotherapy in Colon Cancer Treatment?
 
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Dr. Murty received his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry - New Jersey Medical school. He completed his internship in internal medicine and residency in radiation oncology at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia where he served as Chief Resident. He has done research and published on the radiotherapeutic treatment of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck of unknown origin and total mesorectal excision of rectal cancers. His publications also include a book chapter on the radiation of vascular tumors of the ocular fundus. VIEW THE ARTICLE: http://www.coloncanceranswers.com/radiation-therapy-a-substitute-for-chemotherapy/ LAST WEEK'S VIDEO - The Importance of Learning Genetic Make Up of Colorectal Cancer - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gE_tBCIKoiI SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE EXPERT INFORMATION AND BREAKING COLON CANCER NEWS http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... VISIT COLONCANCERANSWERS.com FOR TONS OF INFORMATIVE VIDEOS http://www.coloncanceranswers.com/ SUGGEST THE NEXT TOPIC FOR OUR COLON CANCER EXPERTS! http://www.coloncanceranswers.com/ CONNECT WITH US! Google+ : http://bit.ly/169ii4g Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ColonCancerA... Twitter : https://twitter.com/ColonCancerQA
Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) for Colon and Rectal Cancer in the Liver
 
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Sarah Cannon Radiation Oncology Physician-in-Chief Andrew Kennedy, MD, discusses metastatic colorectal cancer and answers participants’ questions during a live Chris4Life Virtual Roundtable. Dr. Kennedy is joined by a stage IV colorectal cancer survivor who has undergone the Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) procedure using SIR-Spheres® Y-90 resin microspheres and shares her story. Topics included... •What are SIR-Spheres Y-90 resin microspheres •Who is eligible •Effectiveness of treatment •Next steps for potential patients Disclaimer The views and opinions expressed here are those of the individual contributors alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of Sirtex Medical Limited, its clients, or staff. The information on this service is provided is "as is" with all faults and without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, including those of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, or arising from a course of dealing, usage or trade practice. Sirtex Medical Ltd makes no warranties or representations regarding the accuracy or completeness of the information. All products or services and logo's contained on the Sirtex site are the trademarks, service marks, registered trademarks or registered service marks of their respective owners. The contents of the Sirtex World Wide Web site are protected by the copyright laws of Australia. No portion may be reproduced in any form, or by any means, without the prior written consent of Sirtex Medical Ltd. Indication SIR-Spheres microspheres are indicated for the treatment of unresectable metastatic liver tumors from primary colorectal cancer with adjuvant intra-hepatic artery chemotherapy (IHAC) of FUDR (Floxuridine). Important Safety Information Almost all treatments and drugs produce unwanted side effects. Most side effects following a Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) procedure are minor, but a small number can be serious. Every patient is different in how he or she reacts to a treatment. Many patients experience abdominal pain or tightness in their abdomen, nausea and loss of appetite which normally subsides within a week. Patients also develop a mild fever that may last for up to a week, and fatigue which may last for several weeks. In rare instances, a small number of microspheres may inadvertently reach other organs in the body, such as the gallbladder, stomach, intestine, lung, or pancreas. If SIR-Spheres microspheres reach these organs, they may cause inflammation and potentially ulceration. These complications are rare, but if they do occur they may require additional medical treatment. Please contact your health care professional about your condition and additional information concerning SIR-Spheres microspheres. www.sirtex.com/risk
Views: 2833 Sirtex Medical US
Survivor Coach Tom: Side Effects from Head to Toe | Fight Colorectal Cancer
 
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Tom discusses the many side effects he experienced with stage 3 rectal cancer. He also talks about the importance being proactive and taking responsibility for your treatment and recovery. Fight Colorectal Cancer envisions victory over colon and rectal cancers. To learn more, visit http://fightcolorectalcancer.org/
Views: 1820 FightCRC
How Is Radiation Therapy Used to Treat Colorectal Cancer? - Ovunc Bardakcioglu, MD
 
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Radiation isn't typically used to treat colon cancer, says Ovunc Bardakcioglu, MD, a colon and rectal surgeon at Sunrise Hospital. In this video, he discusses which therapies are used to treat the disease. Visit our website for more information: http://sunrisehospital.com/
Chemotherapy and Radiation Side Effects HD
 
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Pharmacist Andi Roths on therapies and treatments for Chemotherapy and Radiation Side Effects.
End of Stage 3 Colorectal Cancer, with Only Radiation Treatment Left after Surgery and Metastasis
 
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Natural Healing Education Center/ 82-2-2677-3004, 82-10-5703-3004/ 832, Surak-ro, Beolgok-myeon, Nonsan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, Republic of Korea http://healthcounsel.co.kr/ https://blog.naver.com/seedjuice
New colon cancer treatment shows promise
 
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A new way to treat certain types of colon cancer has shown promising results. CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook explains.
Views: 14102 CBS Evening News
Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) Video
 
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Capital Health physicians are licensed to offer a new FDA-approved treatment to patients with colorectal cancer that has metastasized to the liver. This video demonstrates how the treatment works.
Views: 11545 capitalhealthnj
Treatment of stage II and stage III rectal cancer
 
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Patients with stage II were stage III rectal cancers should undergo neoadjuvant chemo radiation followed by surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.
Managing Side Effects & Recurrence
 
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Explains how to manage side effects after surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, coping after surgery, and pain management.
Colon Cancer Treatment
 
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Colon cancer treatment, the third interview with Scott Spaulding and his continuing experiences with his diagnosed colon cancer. In the first two interviews we covered his diagnosis, chemotherapy, radiation and surgery. At that time he had to function with an ileostomy and more chemotherapy and potentially another surgery. http://YHTV.us
Views: 55 YogaHub