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Sertraline (Zoloft): What You Need To Know
 
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Sertraline is an antidepressant in the SSRI class. It’s used for depression, anxiety, panic disorder, OCD, and a number of other conditions. After entering the market in the early 1990s, sertraline became one of the most popular antidepressants. The drug is used in adults, adolescents, and children. There might be greater concerns and lower efficacy in young people. Overview Page (Including References): https://thedrugclassroom.com/video/sertraline/ Reddit discussion: https://www.reddit.com/r/TheDrugClassroom/comments/5ttchh/sertraline_zoloft/ Sertraline = Zoloft; Lustral ------------ Donate to The Drug Classroom: https://www.patreon.com/TheDrugClassroom https://www.paypal.me/TheDrugClassroom Bitcoin: 1HsjCYpBHKcVCaW4uKBraCGkc1LK8xoj1B ------------ Thank you to my Patreon supporters: Glen Marshall, Jonathon Dunn, Thomas Anaya, Ross Martin, Star Ape, michael hoogwater, and David Kernell. ------------ Facebook - http://facebook.com/thedrugclassroom Twitter - http://twitter.com/drugclassroom ------------ The Drug Classroom (TDC) is dedicated to providing the type of drug education everyone should have. Drugs are never going to leave our society and there has never been a society free from drugs. Therefore, it only makes sense to provide real education free from propaganda. TDC doesn't advocate drug use. Rather, we operate with the intention of reducing the harm some substances can bring. Feel free to ask questions!
Views: 113697 The Drug Classroom
Are Apples the Best Food for a Better Sex Life in Women?
 
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Addyi (flibanserin) the drug marketed for “hypoactive sexual desire disorder” is ineffective and unsafe. What about dietary approaches for female sexual dysfunction? Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free recipe from his new HOW NOT TO DIE COOKBOOK. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from his books, DVDs, and speaking directly support NutritionFacts.org). The psychiatry profession is infamous for colluding with drug companies to invent new mental disorders. I have some videos already scripted in the queue on “orthorexia.” Subscribe (https://nutritionfacts.org/subscribe/) if you haven’t already to get notified so you don’t miss it. If this video didn’t upset you enough about the stranglehold Big Pharma has on the mental health profession, take a gander at Do Antidepressant Drugs Really Work? (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-antidepressant-drugs-really-work/) On a happier note, more on the benefits of apples: • The Antioxidant Effects of Acai vs. Apples (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Does-Apple-Cider-Vinegar-Help-with-Weight-Loss) • Does Apple Cider Vinegar Help with Weight Loss? (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-apple-cider-vinegar-help-with-weight-loss) • Apple Skin: Peeling Back Cancer (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/apple-skin-peeling-back-cancer/) • Dried Apples Versus Cholesterol (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/apple-skin-peeling-back-cancer/) • Apple Peels Put to the Test for Chronic Joint Pain (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/apple-peels-put-to-the-test-for-chronic-joint-pain) • Does an Apple a Day Really Keep the Doctor Away (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-an-apple-a-day-really-keep-the-doctor-away) Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/are-apples-the-best-food-for-a-better-sex-life-in-women and someone on the NutritionFacts.org team will try to answer it. Want to get a list of links to all the scientific sources used in this video? Click on Sources Cited at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/are-apples-the-best-food-for-a-better-sex-life-in-women. You’ll also find a transcript and acknowledgments for the video, my blog and speaking tour schedule, and an easy way to search (by translated language even) through our videos spanning more than 2,000 health topics. If you’d rather watch these videos on YouTube, subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nutritionfactsorg Thanks for watching. I hope you’ll join in the evidence-based nutrition revolution! -Michael Greger, MD FACLM Captions for this video are available in several languages. To find yours, click on the settings wheel on the lower-right of the video and then "Subtitles/CC." http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast : http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Views: 33099 NutritionFacts.org
Antidepressant Eases Stressed Hearts
 
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http://www.dailyrx.com/myocardial-ischemia-patients-escitalopram-may-be-less-likely http://www.rxwiki.com/lexapro Stress induced Myocardial ischemia may be helped with some antidpressants. In myocardial ischemia, the heart muscle doesn't receive enough blood... which can lead to a heart attack. Previous studies have shown emotional stress can trigger the condition,but researchers found the anti-depressant escitalopram, brand name Lexapro, may improve mental-stress induced myocardial ischemia. Ask your doctor about ways to reduce stress. For dailyRx TV, I'm Jennifer Dodd.
Views: 238 dailyRx
Why Stress Anxiety and Panic Attacks Cause Fear
 
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http://www.PanicAttacksCure.org Panic disorder is different from the normal fear and anxiety reactions to stressful events in our lives. Panic disorder is a serious condition that strikes without reason or warning. Symptoms of panic disorder include sudden attacks of fear and nervousness, as well as physical symptoms such as sweating and a racing heart. During a panic attack, the fear response is out of proportion for the situation, which often is not threatening. Over time, a person with panic disorder develops a constant fear of having another panic attack, which can affect daily functioning and general quality of life. Panic disorder often occurs along with other serious conditions, such as depression, alcoholism, or drug abuse. What Are the Symptoms of Panic Disorder? Symptoms of a panic attack, which often last about 10 minutes, include: Difficulty breathing. Pounding heart or chest pain. Intense feeling of dread.Sensation of choking or smothering. Dizziness or feeling faint. Trembling or shaking. Sweating. Nausea or stomachache. Tingling or numbness in the fingers and toes. Chills or hot flashes. A fear that you are losing control or are about to die. Beyond the panic attacks themselves, a key symptom of panic disorder is the persistent fear of having future panic attacks. What Causes Panic Disorder? Although the exact cause of panic disorder is not fully understood, studies have shown that a combination of factors, including biological and environmental, may be involved. Abnormalities in the brain. Substance abuse. Abuse of drugs and alcohol can contribute to panic disorder. Major life stress. Stressful events and major life transitions, such as the death of a loved one, can trigger panic disorder. Panic disorder most often begins during late adolescence and early adulthood. It is twice as common in women as in men.How Is Panic Disorder Diagnosed? If symptoms of panic disorder are present, the doctor will begin an evaluation by performing a complete medical history and physical exam. Although there are no lab tests to specifically diagnose panic disorder, the doctor may use various tests to look for physical illness as the cause of symptoms. If no physical illness is found, you may be referred to a psychiatrist or psychologist, mental health professionals who are specially trained to diagnose and treat mental illnesses. Psychiatrists and psychologists use specially designed interview and assessment tools to evaluate a person for panic disorder. The doctor bases his or her diagnosis on reported intensity and duration of symptoms, including the frequency of panic attacks, and the doctor's observation of the patient's attitude and behavior. The doctor then determines if the symptoms and degree of dysfunction suggest panic disorder. A combination of the following therapies is often used to treat panic disorder. Psychotherapy (a type of counseling) addresses the emotional response to mental illness. It is a process in which trained mental health professionals help people by talking through strategies for understanding and dealing with their disorder. Therapy that helps a person learn to recognize and change thought patterns and behaviors that lead to troublesome feelings. Therapy also aims to identify possibly triggers for panic attacks. Medication . The anti-depressant drugs Paxil and Zoloft and anti-anxiety medications such as Xanax, Ativan, or Klonopin are used to treat panic disorders. Sometimes, heart medications (such as beta blockers) are used to help with anxiety. Relaxation techniques. When panic attacks continue after treatment has stopped, additional treatment may still help control and reduce panic attacks. In addition, relaxation techniques, such as breathing retraining and positive visualization, may help a person during an attack. Panic disorder can be successfully treated, and sufferers can go on to lead full and satisfying lives. With appropriate treatment, nearly 90% of people with panic disorder can find relief. Without treatment, panic disorder can have serious consequences and can severely impair quality of life. Complications of untreated panic disorder include. Avoidance. A person may discontinue any activities that seem to trigger a panic attack. This can make a normal work and home life nearly impossible. Anticipatory anxiety. This refers to anxiety that is triggered merely by thinking about the possibility of having an anxiety attack. Agoraphobia. This is the fear of being in places or situations in which an attack may occur, or from which escape would be difficult or highly embarrassing. This fear can drive people to avoid public places and crowds, and may even progress to the point that the person will not leave his or her home. About one-third of people with panic disorder develop agoraphobia. Claustrophobia.
Views: 1085 Jeff Oneel
Vasovagal response
 
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A vasovagal episode or vasovagal response or vasovagal attack (also called neurocardiogenic syncope) is a malaise mediated by the vagus nerve. When it leads to syncope or "fainting", it is called a vasovagal syncope, which is the most common type of fainting. Vasovagal syncope more commonly affects young adults. There are different syncope syndromes which all fall under the umbrella of vasovagal syncope. The common element among these conditions is the central mechanism leading to loss of consciousness. The differences among them are in the factors that trigger this mechanism. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2721 Audiopedia
Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome
 
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Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS, also postural tachycardia syndrome) is thought to be a condition of partial dysautonomia, to be more specific orthostatic intolerance (OI), in which a change from the supine position to an upright position causes an abnormally large increase in heart rate, called tachycardia. Several studies show a decrease in cerebral blood flow with systolic and diastolic cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity decreased 44% and 60%, respectively. People with POTS have problems maintaining homeostasis when changing position, e.g. moving from one chair to another or reaching above their heads. Many also experience symptoms when stationary or even while lying down. Symptoms present in various degrees of severity depending on the individual. POTS can be severely debilitating. Some afflicted individuals are unable to attend school or work and for especially severe cases, they are completely incapacitated. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 288 Audiopedia
How To Say Myelosuppression
 
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Learn how to say Myelosuppression with EmmaSaying free pronunciation tutorials
Views: 23 Emma Saying
Vasovagal response
 
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A vasovagal episode or vasovagal response or vasovagal attack is a malaise mediated by the vagus nerve. When it leads to syncope or "fainting", it is called a vasovagal syncope, which is the most common type of fainting. Vasovagal syncope more commonly affects young adults. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 10914 encyclopediacc
Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome
 
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Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome is a condition of dysautonomia, to be more specific orthostatic intolerance, in which a change from the supine position to an upright position causes an abnormally large increase in heart rate, called tachycardia. Several studies show a decrease in cerebral blood flow with systolic and diastolic cerebral blood flow velocity decreased 44% and 60%, respectively. People with POTS have problems maintaining homeostasis when changing position, e.g. moving from one chair to another or reaching above their heads. Many also experience symptoms when stationary or even while lying down. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 234 encyclopediacc
Orthostatic Meaning
 
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Video shows what orthostatic means. Of, or relating to upright posture.. Of, or relating to an orthostat.. Orthostatic Meaning. How to pronounce, definition audio dictionary. How to say orthostatic. Powered by MaryTTS, Wiktionary
Views: 154 SDictionary
WomenHeart Champions 2011 (cc)
 
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Women with heart disease share life changes since diagnosis with Dr. Sharonne Hayes (Mayo Clinic). The cornerstone of the 2011 Women and Heart Disease Conference presented by ETSU's Quillen College of Medicine (Nashville, June 2011) featured Brenda Taylor, Constance Adcock, and author Cyndi Brown. Brown's new book, "Can You Hear Me Now, or Do I Need to Yell into Your Stethoscope," is about to be released. The entire conference can be seen in iTunes U at http://bit.ly/puEe72 This project is funded under an agreement with the Tennessee Department of Health. ETSU Online Programs - http://www.etsu.edu/online
How To Say Neuritis
 
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Learn how to say Neuritis with EmmaSaying free pronunciation tutorials
Views: 17 Emma Saying
How to Pronounce Radiculitis
 
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Learn how to say words in English correctly with Emma Saying free pronunciation tutorials. Over 140,000 words were already uploaded... Check them out! Visit my homepage: http://www.emmasaying.com
Views: 1193 Emma Saying
How to Pronounce Bacteriocides
 
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This video shows you how to pronounce Bacteriocides
How to Pronounce Topiramate
 
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This video shows you how to pronounce Topiramate
Views: 198 Pronunciation Guide
How to Keep From Passing Out While Having a Panic Attack
 
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http://www.Panic-Away.me What Are the Treatments for Panic Attacks? http://www.Panic-Away.me The cause of most panic attacks is not clear, so treatment may be different for each person. Medication is used for prevention and/or immediate alleviation of symptoms and is usually the main line of treatment. In addition, psychotherapy such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, relaxation, and/or meditation are often used to help relax the body and relieve anxiety. http://www.Panic-Away.me If you're in the middle of a panic attack, immediate relief of anxiety symptoms can come from taking a sedative type anti-anxiety medication such as Xanax, Klonopin, and Ativan. These drugs are provided at least in the beginning of medical therapy, but are not for long-term use. Antidepressants often help prevent anxiety and reduce the frequency and severity of panic attacks, but are not used for immediate relief during an attack. Frequently used antidepressants are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Lexapro, and Zoloft. This group of medications is often considered the first line of treatment for panic disorders. Some newer anticonvulsant drugs, such as Lyrica and Neurontin, have also begun to show value in research studies as experimental treatments for some anxiety disorders, including panic disorder. Important note regarding medications: Some of these drugs can actually produce the anxiety symptoms of a panic attack. It is often best to start with a low dose and slowly increase medication as recommended by your health care provider. For preventive or maintenance care, psychotherapy offers support and helps minimize fear. In some cases, psychotherapy alone can clear up the disorder. Cognitive-behavioral therapy helps people learn to deal with panic symptoms, using techniques like muscle and breathing relaxation. Patients also gain reassurance that panic will not lead to the catastrophic events they fear, since many people fear they are having a heart attack or going crazy. How Can I Prevent Panic Attacks? You can take steps to lessen the chance of having panic attacks and learn to manage them better. Here are some tips: Take your time. It's important not to hope for a quick cure. Therapy takes time, and improvement comes in small steps. Go easy on yourself. People who feel panic tend to be overly critical of themselves. Learn to lower your level of everyday anxiety through a variety of techniques, including meditation and exercise. Learn other relaxation techniques, like deep breathing or guided imagery. Avoid stimulants, such as nicotine and caffeine, which can be found not only in coffee, but many teas, colas, and chocolate. Learn to recognize a panic attack. When you sense the first symptoms, know that other symptoms may follow. Take slow, deep breaths. Remember, you have survived them before and can do so again. http://www.Panic-Away.me
Views: 1828 Paraskeva Eftimova