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Asthma - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is asthma? Asthma is characterized by chronic inflammation and asthma exacerbations, where an environmental trigger initiates inflammation, which makes it difficult to breathe. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what you’re learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Thank you to our Patreon supporters: Sumant Nanduri Omar Berrios Alex Wright Suzanne Peek Prayag Tapiavala Arfan Azam Mingli Féng Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the world’s caregivers with the best learning experience possible.
Views: 171611 Osmosis
What is ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA? What does ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA mean? ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA meaning
 
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What is ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA? What does ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA mean? ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA meaning - ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA definition - ACUTE SEVERE ASTHMA explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Acute severe asthma (also referred to in Latin as status asthmaticus, or asthmatic status) is an acute exacerbation of asthma that does not respond to standard treatments of bronchodilators (inhalers) and steroids. Symptoms include chest tightness, rapidly progressive dyspnea (shortness of breath), dry cough, use of accessory respiratory muscles, labored breathing, and extreme wheezing. It is a life-threatening episode of airway obstruction and is considered a medical emergency. Complications include cardiac and/or respiratory arrest. It is characterized histologically by smooth muscle hypertrophy and basement membrane thickening. An exacerbation (attack) of asthma is experienced as a worsening of asthma symptoms with breathlessness and cough (often worse at night). In acute severe asthma, breathlessness may be so severe that it is impossible to speak more than a few words (inability to complete sentences). On examination, the respiratory rate may be elevated (more than 25 breaths per minute), and the heart rate may be rapid (110 beats per minute or faster). Reduced oxygen saturation levels (but above 92%) are often encountered. Examination of the lungs with a stethoscope may reveal reduced air entry and/or widespread wheeze. The peak expiratory flow can be measured at the bedside; in acute severe asthma the flow is less than 50% a person's normal or predicted flow. Very severe acute asthma (termed "near-fatal" as there is an immediate risk to life) is characterised by a peak flow of less than 33% predicted, oxygen saturations below 92% or cyanosis (blue discoloration, usually of the lips), absence of audible breath sounds over the chest ("silent chest"), reduced respiratory effort and visible exhaustion or drowsiness. Irregularities in the heart beat and abnormal lowering of the blood pressure may be observed. Inflammation in asthma is characterized by an influx of eosinophils during the early-phase reaction and a mixed cellular infiltrate composed of eosinophils, mast cells, lymphocytes, and neutrophils during the late-phase (or chronic) reaction. The simple explanation for allergic inflammation in asthma begins with the development of a predominantly helper T2 lymphocyte–driven, as opposed to helper T1 lymphocyte–driven, immune milieu, perhaps caused by certain types of immune stimulation early in life. This is followed by allergen exposure in a genetically susceptible individual. Specific allergen exposure (e.g., dust mites) under the influence of helper T2 lymphocytes leads to B-lymphocyte elaboration of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies specific to that allergen. The IgE antibody attaches to surface receptors on airway mucosal mast cells. One important question is whether atopic individuals with asthma, in contrast to atopic persons without asthma, have a defect in mucosal integrity that makes them susceptible to penetration of allergens into the mucosa. Subsequent specific allergen exposure leads to cross-bridging of IgE molecules and activation of mast cells, with elaboration and release of a vast array of mediators. These mediators include histamine; leukotrienes C4, D4, and E4; and a host of cytokines. Together, these mediators cause bronchial smooth muscle constriction, vascular leakage, inflammatory cell recruitment (with further mediator release), and mucous gland secretion. These processes lead to airway obstruction by constriction of the smooth muscles, edema of the airways, influx of inflammatory cells, and formation of intraluminal mucus. In addition, ongoing airway inflammation is thought to cause the airway hyperreactivity characteristic of asthma. The more severe the airway obstruction, the more likely ventilation-perfusion mismatching will result in impaired gas exchange and hypoxemia. Interventions include intravenous (IV) medications (e.g magnesium sulfate), aerosolized medications, and positive-pressure therapy, including mechanical ventilation. Multiple therapies may be used simultaneously to rapidly reverse the effects of status asthmaticus and reduce permanent damage of the airways. Intravenous and aerosolized treatments such as corticosteroids and methylxanthines are often given. According to a new randomized control trial ketamine and aminophylline are also effective in children with acute asthma who responds poorly to standard therapy.
Views: 1141 The Audiopedia
Asthma Symptoms & Treatments : Chronic Asthma Cough in Children
 
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A chronic cough in a child is one that lasts longer than four weeks, and this is caused by irritants to the respiratory system. Find out why it's important to get a proper diagnosis when attempting to get treatment for a chronic cough with help from a nurse and respiratory care practitioner in this free video on asthma symptoms.
Views: 6814 ehowhealth
What is asthma? | Respiratory system diseases | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Created by Amy Fan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-respiratory-system-diseases/rn-asthma/v/asthma-pathophysiology?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-respiratory-system-diseases/rn-intro-to-pulmonary-diseases/v/streptococcus-pneumoniae-and-flu-vaccines?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 392822 khanacademymedicine
Asthma Treatment, Symptoms, Pathophysiology, Nursing Interventions NCLEX Review Lecture
 
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Asthma treatment (asthma attack), symptoms, pathophysiology nursing NCLEX review lecture. This lecture will detail the pathophysiology of asthma along with the early warning signs vs active signs of an asthma attack. In addition to a sample asthma action plan along with using a peak flow meter to monitor asthma, asthma triggers, nursing interventions for asthma, and all the medications used to treat asthma, which are bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory medications. What is asthma? Asthma is a chronic lung disease (no cure) that causes narrowing and inflammation of the airways (bronchi and bronchioles) that leads to difficulty breathing. How does it happen? Normally, when you breathe in air, it travels down through your upper airway to your lower airway, which includes the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli (where gas exchanges happens). The oxygen you breathe in crosses over into your blood stream, and the carbon dioxide in your blood crosses over into the airway to be exhaled. In patients with asthma, the bronchi and bronchioles are chronically inflamed and can become so inflamed that it leads to an asthma attack (wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, coughing), which is usually due to a trigger of some type. Asthma triggers include: -Environment: smoke, pollen, pollution, perfumes, dander, dust mites, pests (cockroaches), cold and dry air, mold -Body Issue: respiratory infection, GERD, hormonal shifts, exercise-induced -Intake of Certain Substances: drugs (beta adrenergic blockers that are nonselective), NSAIDS, aspirin, preservatives (sulfites) Signs and Symptoms of an asthma attack include: chest tightness, wheezing (auscultate…expiratory wheezing and can progress to inspiratory wheezes in severe cases), coughing, difficulty breathing (***especially exhaling), increased respiratory rate Asthma treatment includes: bronchodilators (beta-agonists, anticholinergics, theophylline along with anti-inflammatories (corticosteroids, leukotriene modifiers, immunomodulators, cromolyn). Asthma NCLEX questions: http://www.registerednursern.com/asthma-nclex-questions/ Notes: http://www.registerednursern.com/asthma-nclex-review/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/registerednursern_com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RegisteredNurseRNs Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Popular Playlists: NCLEX Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 Fluid & Electrolytes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv Nursing Skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Nursing School Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms Nursing School Tips & Questions" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF Types of Nursing Specialties: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp Healthcare Salary Information: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh New Nurse Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy Nursing Career Help: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj EKG Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt Dosage & Calculations for Nurses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq Diabetes Health Managment: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 145756 RegisteredNurseRN
How an asthma attack occurs
 
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Asthma is a common condition that causes difficulty with breathing. Find out more here: http://bit.ly/O5hQst Our video shows what happens in the lungs during an asthma attack and how an inhaler works to treat the attack. The content is intended for general information only and does not replace the need for personal advice from a qualified health professional.
Views: 325259 Bupa Health UK
Asthma diagnosis | Respiratory system diseases | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Created by Amy Fan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-respiratory-system-diseases/rn-asthma/v/asthma-severity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-respiratory-system-diseases/rn-asthma/v/asthma-pathophysiology?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 84161 khanacademymedicine
Asthma Explained Clearly
 
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Understand asthma with this clear explanation by Dr. Roger Seheult of http://www.medcram.com. Includes discussion on asthma pathophysiology, signs and symptoms of asthma, diagnosis, triggers (GERD, post nasal drip, down feathers, etc.), flow volume loops, samter's triad, and more. This is video 1 of 2 on asthma and treatment. Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. MedCram: Medical topics explained clearly including: Asthma, COPD, Acute Renal Failure, Mechanical Ventilation, Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve, Hypertension, Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Medical Acid Base, VQ Mismatch, Hyponatremia, Liver Function Tests, Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs), Adrenal Gland, Pneumonia Treatment, any many others. New topics are often added weekly- please subscribe to help support MedCram and become notified when new videos have been uploaded. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=medcramvideos Recommended Audience: Health care professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram: Complete Video library: https://www.youtube.com/c/medcram Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical educational and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your health care provider.
Asthma and COPD - Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology
 
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A review of the pathology of asthma and COPD, including the role of the immune system, along with the mechanisms behind the hypercapnia and hypoxemia of COPD, and the blue bloater vs. pink puffer pseudodichotomy.
Views: 40929 Strong Medicine
Asthma Treatment
 
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Asthma Treatment Instructional Tutorial Video CanadaQBank.com QBanks for AMC Exams, MCCEE, MCCQE & USMLE URL: http://youtu.be/ffxfKaXlX8s
Views: 33952 CanadaQBank
Inhalers (Asthma & COPD Treatment) Explained Clearly
 
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Join Dr. Seheult of https://www.medcram.com as he clarifies the inhalers and progression used for asthma and COPD treatment. Understand the difference in naming and usage of SABA inhalers (short acting beta agonists, LABA inhalers (long acting beta agonists), ICS (inhaled corticosteroids), and LAMAs (long acting muscarinic receptor antagonists). This video provides a concise overview of the step up inhaler treatment for both asthma and COPD. Includes discussion of albuterol, salmeterol, fluticasone, tiotropium, and many others. Visit https://www.MedCram.com for this entire course and over 100 free lectures. This is the home for ALL MedCram.com medical videos (many medical videos, medical lectures, and quizzes are not on YouTube). Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Co-Founder of MedCram.com (https://www.medcram.com) Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. MedCram: Medical education topics explained clearly including: Respiratory lectures such as Asthma and COPD. Renal lectures on Acute Renal Failure and Adrenal Gland. Internal medicine videos on Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve and Medical Acid Base. A growing library on critical care topics such as Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), and Mechanical Ventilation. Cardiology videos on Hypertension, ECG / EKG Interpretation, and heart failure. VQ Mismatch and Hyponatremia lectures have been popular among medical students and physicians. The Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) videos and Ventilator associated pneumonia bundles and lectures have been particularly popular with RTs. NPs and PAs have given great feedback on Pneumonia Treatment and Liver Function Tests among many others. Many nursing students have found the Asthma and shock lectures very helpful. Subscribe to the official MedCram.com YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=medcramvideos Recommended Audience - medical professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review and test prep for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NBDE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram.com medical videos: MedCram Website: https://www.medcram.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical education and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your doctor or health care provider.
Asthma and COPD: Stable Disease - Diagnosis and Management
 
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An overview of how asthma and COPD are diagnosed, staged, and treated. Discussion of pharmacology, including indications for certain drugs, is included.
Views: 30370 Strong Medicine
How to Naturally Treat Asthma
 
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For more info: https://draxe.com/asthma-symptoms/?utm_campaign=Youtube-Jun-2015&utm_medium=social&utm_source=youtube&utm_term=asthma In today’s video I’m going to share with you the top herbs, diet, and supplements to treat asthma. There are some things you can do that can help naturally ease asthma. 1. Know your food sensitivities a. Food sensitivities to wheat products like grains, conventional dairy, soy; get these foods out of your diet. 2. Eliminate foods that cause phlegm build up. a. The diet you want to follow is high in vegetables, fruits, easily digestible protein, and omega-3 fatty acids. 3. Top supplements you want to consume are: a. Quercetin, bromelain, inositol, cysteine and vitamin c 4. Essential oils that support the airways a. Peppermint oil and eucalyptus oil If you follow these tips, you should see great results in treating your asthma. For more on asthma, you can check out this article: http://draxe.com/asthma-natural-remedies/ *This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe, and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Views: 212930 Dr. Josh Axe
What Constitutes Severe Asthma?
 
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It is made more confusing because there are several other words people use to describe it (difficult, when the diagnosis of asthma confirmed and comorbidities addressed, severe defined as that requires treatment with high dose inhaled 21 nov 2015 in making a decision about child's severity level, first distinction be whether your child has intermittent (ie, just based on disease. Doctors don't know why some people get severe asthma attacks. Uk severe asthma what is url? Q webcache. Learn more about severe asthma acute is an exacerbation of that does not respond to standard treatments bronchodilators (inhalers) and steroidsbackground or therapy resistant increasingly recognised as a major unmet need. So, what is 12 dec 2014 the diagnosis and treatment of severe asthma time consuming requires special experience. What is severe asthma? Asthma asthma definition, diagnosis and treatment ncbi niheveryday healthsevere guidelines american thoracic societyasthma society of ireland. But if you have a severe asthma diagnosis, the inflammation and sensitivity of your airways is likely to be worse lot time, so may need steroid tablets along with inhalers, in long term, help keep this under control around 17 per cent people often symptoms frequent attacks. It may be more likely if you don't often see your doctor, 4 nov 2015 in order to better help these asthmatics, researchers now categorize them under a special asthma subtype called severe. However, even people with intermittent or mild asthma can have severe attacks 31 mar 2016 around 5. Severe asthma is defined as that requires treatment with high doses of inhaled or systemic corticosteroids to prevent it from becoming uncontrolled 20 oct 2016 symptoms. One medicine commonly used to reduce inflammation in the airways is steroids. The natural history of acute decompensations is one resolution and only 31 mar 2016 an exacerbation asthma serious can even become life threatening. Severe brittle asthma and status asthmaticus mild, moderate, severe what do grades mean classifying severity foundation there is a difference between attack symptoms causes mayo clinic. Asthma may be classified as intermittent, mild persistent, moderate and severe persistent. What is severe asthma? What 'difficult to control' asthma status asthmaticus (severe attacks) symptoms and webmd. Acute severe asthma american journal of respiratory and critical acute exacerbation what are the symptoms? Healthlineis serious? Asthma sharecare. There is a need for competent treatment 30 may 2017 about 24 million americans have asthma, and some, the condition can be severe. Asthma attack signs and symptoms include severe shortness of breath, chest tightness or pain, coughing wheezing; Low 20 aug 2002 acute asthma remains a major economic health burden. What is severe asthma? . More rarely, you might have a specific type of asthma called 'severe' asthma' causes. That's why it's important to recognize the symptoms early what is severe asthma? Though p
Views: 19 Pan Pan 3
Severe Asthma GlaxoSmithKline
 
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Asthma is a chronic lung disease that causes inflammation and narrowing of the airways. People with asthma suffer from recurrent periods of shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing and chest tightness. Symptoms can occur at any time, including asthma attacks or ‘exacerbations’ during the night. People with severe asthma struggle to control their day-to-day asthma symptoms and may continue to have attacks, even when they are taking high doses of prescribed medications.
Views: 199 KGUN9
10 WARNING SIGNS of Your LUNG May Be FAILING. How Do You Know If You Have LUNG PROBLEMS?
 
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Signs Your LUNGS Might Be FAILING. When your lungs struggle, you struggle. It's normal to think that lung disease would mess with your breathing patterns, but some of the symptoms aren't that obvious. Your body can send out an SOS in many different ways. Recognizing these signals can help you treat your flagging lungs and breathe a little easier. The most common culprit of lung problems? Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD. More than 11 million people in the US have it. "COPD is currently the 4th leading cause of death in the world and likely soon to be the 3rd," says Lauren Goodman, MD, assistant professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Typical COPD disorders include emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, and cystic fibrosis. But other conditions can cause respiratory failure, too, like interstitial lung diseases that scar the tissue between the air sacs of your lungs. So if you're dealing with any of the following symptoms, don't discount your lungs. They might be telling you they need a closer look. You're always out of energy. Does a single flight of stairs make you feel like you ran a marathon? Do you find yourself unable to do daily tasks without needing a catnap? Your cells need oxygen to produce the energy that keeps your motor running. When your lungs aren't delivering enough oxygen to your body, you start to drag. What's more, having low energy can start a vicious cycle—fatigue keeps you from exercising, and a lack of exercise makes it harder to keep up your stamina, even for everyday tasks. You can't catch your breath. You may think getting long in years automatically means getting short in breath, but that's not always the case. If your days of breathing easy have suddenly gone away, it may be time for your doctor to give your lungs a listen. "Sometimes [shortness of breath] is from difficulty emptying out the lungs enough and having too much air trapped inside your chest," says Goodman. Even when getting air out isn't an issue, ailing lungs can leave you gasping just by not doing their main job: delivering adequate oxygen into your blood. You're dazed and confused. Did you know your brain uses 15 to 20% of your body's oxygen supply? Your noggin needs oxygen to keep you thinking straight; if your O2 level tanks because your lungs aren't delivering the goods, your thoughts can get muddled. "Very low oxygen levels and very high carbon dioxide levels can cause confusion or make a person sleepy," says Goodman. You've lost weight but don't know why. Advanced lung disease brings on a multitude of body problems that can make you shed a few pounds unexpectedly. And it's not always fat you're losing. "In COPD especially, there can be lots of inflammation throughout the body that causes muscles to lose mass," says Goodman. It can also be hard to eat much in one sitting if breathing is a struggle when your stomach starts to get full. You're constantly coughing. A cough that won't go away—especially if it comes with mucus, blood, or a fever, is cause for concern. It's especially worrisome if you're a smoker, since it's a classic sign of chronic bronchitis or emphysema. Tell your doctor if your cough sticks around for more than 3 weeks, particularly if you're finding it harder and harder to breathe as time passes. You have chest pains. A hurting chest is a hallmark of heart trouble, but lungs can bring the pain, too. Lungs don't have pain nerves, says Goodman, but the lining inside your chest does. "Inflammation irritating the lining of the inside of the chest can cause chest pain, called pleuritis," she says. You might also have muscle strain from coughing, or your pain could be from a collapsed lung. Occasionally, people with large cavities in their lungs can have a cavity that bursts and lets air escape into the chest cavity around the lung, which can cause some pain as well," says Goodman. You're 50 shades of gray. When it comes to skin, pink is preferable. Red blood cells, the ones carrying oxygen to your tissues, give you a healthy glow. Bluish-grey lips, fingers, and toes are an indication that those parts of your body aren't getting the oxygen they need. It's most common for skin discoloration to pop up in late-stage lung disease, says Goodman. "It tends to happen more when people exert themselves, but it can happen at rest as well."...
Views: 3590 Healthy Eating Tips
Asthma-dama-Asthma symptoms-Asthamatic-definition of asthma-Attack of Asthma
 
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ASTHMA (DAMA)-MEDICURO-All about diseases- a respiratory condition marked by attacks of spasm in the bronchi of the lungs, causing difficulty in breathing. It is usually connected to allergic reaction or other forms of hypersensitivity. Asthma Information If you frequently experience shortness of breath or you hear a whistling or wheezy sound in your chest when you breathe, you may have asthma—a chronic condition that causes inflammation and narrowing of the bronchial tubes, the passageways that allow air to enter and leave the lungs. Asthma Symptoms Asthma is a chronic lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways in the lungs. Symptoms include coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. Who has Asthma and Why? If you frequently experience shortness of breath or you hear a whistling or wheezing sound in your chest when you breathe, you may have asthma. Asthma symptoms affect an estimated 26 million Americans. Types of Asthma Occupational Asthma If you experience wheezing, coughing, chest tightness or shortness of breath at work, you may have occupational asthma. People with this condition usually work around chemical fumes, dust or other irritants in the air. Exercise Induced Asthma If you start wheezing or coughing during exercise, or if physical exertion makes it difficult for you to breathe, you may have exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, or EIB. Asthma & Other Conditions Asthma can complicate other medical conditions. Find out how to manage your asthma during illness or pregnancy. COPD Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a collection of lung diseases that cause breathing problems and airflow obstruction. Included in this group of diseases are refractory (severe) asthma, emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Asthma Treatment Effective treatment of allergic asthma includes identifying and avoiding allergens that trigger symptoms, using drug therapies and developing an emergency action plan for severe attacks.
Views: 196 MEDICURO
Chronic coughing: Possible causes and treatment
 
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Chronic cough is defined as daily coughing for three weeks or more. Although a common complaint in smokers, when non-smokers have a chronic cough with a normal X-ray, the cause is likely one of three things, says Jeffrey Weiland, MD, a pulmonologist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. In half of the cases, it's because of undiagnosed asthma. In the other half, the cause is typically post-nasal drip (particularly common in those 60 or older) or acid reflux. Even when there are no other symptoms of acid reflux, Dr. Weiland explains that it only takes one teaspoon of acid to cause coughing. When patients do present with a chronic cough and have a normal X-ray, asthma treatment is initiated. If that does not resolve the issue, Dr. Weiland then refers patients to an ear, nose and throat specialist to look at the voice box for any indications of irritation or reflux. Learn more about lung conditions or schedule an appointment with an Ohio State pulmonologist: https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/lung-pulmonary Visit The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center: https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/ Subscribe to The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/osumedicalcenter Like The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/OSUWexnerMedicalCenter/ Follow The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/osuwexmed Follow The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/osuwexmed Connect with The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-ohio-state-university-wexner-medical-center
Lung sounds - Breath sounds Types & Causes
 
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Here is a quick review of breath sounds heard on auscultation. The normal breath sounds are Vesicular breath sounds heard on most of the lung. It is soft and of low pitch. Inspiratory phase in longer than expiration without any pause between these two phases. Abnormalities can be presence of bronchial breath sounds, diminished or absent breath sounds, or presence of added/Adventitious breath sounds. Bronchial breathing is hollow, tubular in quality, high pitched. There is definite gap between inspiration & expiration. Added or Adventitious sounds include Wheeze, Crepitations, Pleural friction rub & Stridor. Wheeze can be Low pitched also known as Rhonchi or High pitched which is the usual wheeze. Low pitched wheeze/Rhonchi is caused by secretions in smaller airways causing narrowing while High pitched wheeze is because of Bronchospasm. Stridor is not included in this video as it is not classically a breath sound auscultated but is audible without stethoscope and is caused by narrowing/obstruction of larger airways. A good stethoscope like Litmann stethoscope is a must to pick sounds easily during auscultation. It is encouraged to listen to breath sounds (included in video) with headphones. We hope you enjoy this video ! Good luck ! ________________________________________________________ Please Visit & Subscribe Our Channel for Latest Videos: https://www.youtube.com/lastsecondmedicine Visit us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lastsecondmedicine Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Last_Second_Med Please Leave you valued suggestion in Comments.
Views: 670660 Last Second Medicine
What did you do to get help for your severe asthma?
 
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This video is intended for US audiences only. Donna Matlach, severe asthma patient, answers 'What did you do to get help for your severe asthma?'. Video 3 of 4.
Views: 297 GSK
Asthma : Definition, Clinical Features, Pathogenesis, Treatment (HD)
 
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A brief discussion on Asthma. Topics include: - Definition of Asthma - Clinical Features - Diagnosis of Asthma - Reversibility Test - Classifications - Atopy vs Allergy - Pathogenesis of Atopic Asthma - Early Phase Reaction - Late Phase Reaction - Triggering Factors of Asthma - Treatment of Asthma - 4 Components of Asthma Care - Step Care Management of Asthma in Adult - Prognosis of Asthma Hope it is helpful. - Dr. Rabiul http://www.youtube.com/user/DrRabiulHaque/featured https://www.facebook.com/Pathology.Tutorials
Views: 70802 Rabiul Haque
Respiratory Failure - Causes, Treatments & More...
 
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See much more honest health information at: http://www.rehealthify.com/ Rehealthify offers reliable, up-to-date health information, anytime, anywhere, for free. -- video script below -- Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such as your heart and brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't remove carbon dioxide (a waste gas) from your blood. Too much carbon dioxide in your blood can harm your body's organs. Diseases and conditions that affect your breathing can cause respiratory failure. Examples include Lung diseases such as COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, and cystic fibrosis Conditions that affect the nerves and muscles that control breathing, such as spinal cord injuries, muscular dystrophy and stroke Damage to the tissues and ribs around the lungs. An injury to the chest can cause this damage. Drug or alcohol overdose Injuries from inhaling smoke or harmful fumes Treatment for respiratory failure depends on whether the condition is acute (short-term) or chronic (ongoing) and how severe it is. It also depends on the underlying cause. You may receive oxygen therapy and other treatment to help you breathe. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
Views: 40541 Rehealthify
Understanding Asthma - 360p [Animation]
 
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What is exactly Asthma? Asthma is an inflammatory disorder of the airways, which causes attacks of wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing.Causes, incidence, and risk factors Asthma is caused by inflammation in the airways. When an asthma attack occurs, the muscles surrounding the airways become tight and the lining of the air passages swells. This reduces the amount of air that can pass by. In sensitive people, asthma symptoms can be triggered by breathing in allergy-causing substances (called allergens or triggers). Common asthma triggers include: 1| Animals (pet hair or dander) 2| Dust 3| Changes in weather (most often cold weather) 4| Chemicals in the air or in food 5| Exercise 6| Mold 7| Pollen 8| Respiratory infections, such as the common cold 9| Strong emotions (stress) 10| Tobacco smoke Symptoms Most people with asthma have attacks separated by symptom-free periods. Some people have long-term shortness of breath with episodes of increased shortness of breath. Either wheezing or a cough may be the main symptom.Asthma attacks can last for minutes to days, and can become dangerous if the airflow is severely restricted. Symptoms include: 1| Cough with or without sputum (phlegm) production. 2| Pulling in of the skin between the ribs when breathing (intercostal retractions). 3|Shortness of breath that gets worse with exercise or activity 4|Wheezing, which: Emergency symptoms: Bluish color to the lips and face Decreased level of alertness, such as severe drowsiness or confusion, during an asthma attack Extreme difficulty breathing Rapid pulse Severe anxiety due to shortness of breath Sweating Other symptoms that may occur with this disease: 1| Abnormal breathing pattern --breathing out takes more than twice as long as breathing in. 2| Breathing temporarily stops. 3| Chest pain. 4| Nasal flaring. 5| Tightness in the chest. Go to the emergency room if: 1| You develop drowsiness or confusion. 2| You have severe shortness of breath at rest. 3| Your peak flow measurement is less than 50% of your personal best. 4| You have severe chest pain. Prevention 1| You can reduce asthma symptoms by avoiding known triggers and substances that irritate the airways. 2| Cover bedding with "allergy-proof" casings to reduce exposure to dust mites. 3| Remove carpets from bedrooms and vacuum regularly. 4| Use only unscented detergents and cleaning materials in the home. 5| Keep humidity levels low and fix leaks to reduce the growth of organisms such as mold. 6| Keep the house clean and keep food in containers and out of bedrooms -- this helps reduce the possibility of cockroaches, which can trigger asthma attacks in some people. 7| If a person is allergic to an animal that cannot be removed from the home, the animal should be kept out of the bedroom. Place filtering material over the heating outlets to trap animal dander. 8| Eliminate tobacco smoke from the home. This is the single most important thing a family can do to help a child with asthma. Smoking outside the house is not enough. Family members and visitors who smoke outside carry smoke residue inside on their clothes and hair -- this can trigger asthma symptoms. 9| Persons with asthma should also avoid air pollution, industrial dusts, and other irritating fumes as much as possible. Read More : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001196/ Wikipedia source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asthma I do not own the video. [NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED!] Please read: the use of any copyrighted material is used under the guidelines of "fair use" in title 17 & 107 of the united states code. such material remains the copyright of the original holder and is used here for the purposes of education, comparison & criticism only. no infringement of copyright is intended. no copyright intended! "fair use" The media material presented in this production is protected by the FAIR USE CLAUSE of the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976, which allows for the rebroadcast of copyrighted materials for the purposes of commentary, criticism, and education. [COPYRIGHT STATEMENT] 'Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for 'fair use' for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use'
Views: 278624 toms weisiong
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Asthma, or Both
 
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Differential Diagnosis and Comprehensive Management Strategies Faculty: Sidney S. Braman, MD, FCCP, Reynold A. Panettieri, Jr, MD, James F. Donohue, MD The goal of this activity is to highlight new guidelines for diagnosis of migraine headaches and review treatment strategies for specific patient subtypes, particularly those who experience concomitant gastrointestinal distress. At times, gastrointestinal distress can prevent patients from using their acute medications or reduce the efficacy of oral agents, which means that treatment must be tailored to individual patients and presence of symptoms over time. Patient-centered care based on a comprehensive evaluation of migraine attacks, medical history, and patient preferences, along with the importance of routine follow-up, will be discussed in this engaging, case-based Clinical Research Updates™. View this program in its entirety here http://www.exchangecme.com/ACOSWebcast. You can also visit http://www.ExchangeCME.com for access to additional video content as well as free CME activities in various therapeutic areas.
What Does Shortness of Breath Mean for My Asthma
 
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Shortness of breath is one of the classic asthma symptoms people experience before being diagnosed with asthma or when their asthma is poorly controlled. Other asthma symptoms in addition to shortness of breath include: Wheezing Chest tightness Chronic Cough Shortness of breath refers to feeling breathless or having difficulty breathing. Your doctor may refer to shortness of breath using the medical term dyspnea. There is no strict medical definition for shortness of breath. Patients will often describe this trouble breathing differently. You may hear shortness of breath described as: "Being air hungry" "Unable to catch my breath" "Gasping for breath" "Suffocation" or "smothering" "Unable to complete usual activities" Young children, and even some adults, may have difficulty in describing what shortness of breath feels like. Some adults will also describe shortness of breath as "feeling tired" or a decreased ability to do their normal activities. Young children who are not yet verbal may experience shortness of breath as feeding problems while older children may describe tiredness, fatigue, or just not be able to keep up with other kids their age I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)
Views: 9192 Babuji at work
What is OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA? What does OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA mean? OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA meaning
 
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What is OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA? What does OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA mean? OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA meaning - OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA definition - OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Occupational asthma is an occupational lung disease and a type of asthma. Like other types of asthma, it is characterized by airway inflammation, reversible airways obstruction, and bronchospasm, but it is caused by something in the workplace environment. Symptoms include shortness of breath, tightness of the chest, nasal irritation, coughing and wheezing. The first person to use it in reference to a medical condition was Hippocrates, and he believed that tailors, anglers and metalworkers were more likely to be affected by the disease. Although much research has been done since, the inflammatory component of asthma was recognized only in the 1960s. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a related condition, with many occupational examples (e.g. flock worker's lung, farmer's lung, and indium lung). However, although overlapping in many cases, hypersensitivity pneumonitis may be distinguished from occupational asthma in that it isn't restricted to only occupational exposure, and involves type III hypersensitivity and type IV hypersensitivity rather than the type I hypersensitivity of asthma. Also, unlike asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis targets lung alveoli rather than bronchi. Approximately 21% of the adults affected by asthma report an aggravation of their symptoms while at work and an improvement when away, which implies that they may be suffering from occupational asthma. In the United States, occupational asthma is the most common occupational lung disease. Today, asthma affects as much as 15% of the Canadian population, a statistic reflective of other developed countries, and has increased fourfold in the last 20 years. Various reasons can be identified for this increase, including increase environmental pollution, better diagnostic ability, and greater awareness. Diagnosis of occupational asthma uses several techniques. A non-specific bronchial hyperreactivity test can be used to help diagnose occupational asthma. It involves testing with methacoline, after which the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of the patient is measured. This test is often used for measuring the intensity of a person's asthma and to confirm that the person needs to be treated for asthma. Other non specific tests could require the patient to run for a few minutes at a continuous pace. In this case, the individual’s peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) is measured, showing how fast a person can exhale. PEFR can also be measured at work to see if there is a difference from the PEFR in a controlled environment. Measuring PEFR at work is a highly reliable test for occupational asthma. A skin prick test is usually performed on the inner forearm where a grid is marked and a drop of the allergens to be tested are placed on the arm in the grid. Once this has been done, the skin is pricked through the drop using a lancet. Reactions, if any, occur within 10 to 15 minutes and these results can then be analyzed. Immunoglobulin E is an antibody found in human blood and is effective against toxins. Since it can also trigger allergic reactions to specific allergens like pollen, the IgE test is performed to evaluate whether the subject is allergic to these substances. A spirometer is a device used to measure timed expired and inspired volumes, and can be used to help diagnose occupational asthma. Specific inhalation challenges test for reactions to substances found in the workplace. One method is a whole body sealed chamber where the patient is exposed to articles that are present in their workplace. This method has the advantage of being able to assess, albeit highly subjectively, ocular and nasal symptoms as well as a reduction in FEV1. Another test requires the patient to breathe aerosols of the suspected asthmagens through an oro-facial mask. These asthmagens are aerosolized using closed circuit chambers, and the quantities and concentrations administered are minute and extremely stable, to minimize the risk of exaggerated responses.
Views: 423 The Audiopedia
Can stress trigger asthma in children?
 
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In a study done exclusively for The Detroit News and PBS NewsHour, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found about 2 of every 3 Motor City children face “adverse childhood experiences,” such as household substance abuse, exposure to violence and extreme economic hardship that can trigger asthma. Indira Lakshmanan reports for the NewsHour.
Views: 20239 PBS NewsHour
Half Hour to Health- Asthma and Breathing Problems (Part 1)
 
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Half Hour to Health- Asthma and Breathing Problems (Part 1) What causes Asthma? Are the current medical treatments effective? (hint: NOOO!!) Find out the cause of Asthma and Breathing Problems... And discover the Cure!!! At http://bergmanchiropractic.com and http://Owners-Guide.com we strive to educate people on natural solutions to health. http://www.theArthritisReversalSystem.com is my online video course with 21 videos, 3 manuals and an online forum! http://SkypePackage.com for online consults. SUBSCRIBE at http://www.youtube.com/user/johnbchiro CALL TOLL FREE 1-855-712-0012 to get bonus materials not on YouTube or text your first name and email plus 89869 to 1-817-591-2905. Follow Us on Instagram @natural_cures COPD means that you have some sort of lung issue- What is a lung? People with Asthma are not able to breath properly- Medical treatments will offer little medical relief- you need SELF CARE! you need to see a chiropractor! Water consumption is important for lungs! 14 people die a DAY from Asthma 4000 of the 5000 deaths a YEAR from asthma was caused by the medications Vaccines are causing lung problems
Views: 17055 Dr. John Bergman
Asthma - CRASH! Medical Review Series
 
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(Disclaimer: The medical information contained herein is intended for physician medical licensing exam review purposes only, and are not intended for diagnosis of any illness. If you think you may be suffering from any medical condition, you should consult your physician or seek immediate medical attention.)
Views: 47025 Paul Bolin, M.D.
Treating Uncontrolled Asthma
 
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Despite treatment, approximately 20% of patients with asthma have uncontrolled, moderate-to-severe disease, with substantially reduced lung function and the risk of further loss of function over time. Full study: https://nej.md/2LhxmaA
Views: 1206 NEJMvideo
Living With and Managing Asthma
 
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This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health—describes asthma, its signs and symptoms, and ways to manage the disease. Asthma is a chronic lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways, making it hard to breathe. The disease affects people of all ages, but it most often starts in childhood. People who have asthma may wheeze, cough, feel short of breath, or have chest tightness. Asthma can't be cured, but it can be controlled. People who have asthma, or those who have children with asthma, can take an active role in their treatment. For example, they can work with their health care providers to create an asthma action plan. This plan gives guidance on taking medicines properly, avoiding asthma triggers, tracking levels of asthma control, responding to worsening symptoms, and seeking emergency care when needed. When asthma is well controlled, most people who have the disease are able to live normal, active lives. This video can also be seen at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/videos/asthma/video_asthma.html
Views: 55108 NHLBI
How to Get Rid of Asthma | 7 Simple Steps to Get Rid of Asthma
 
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How to Get Rid of Asthma | 7 Simple Steps to Get Rid of Asthma What is Asthma ? Asthma (AZ-ma) is a chronic (long-term) lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways. Asthma causes recurring periods of wheezing (a whistling sound when you breathe), chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing. The coughing often occurs at night or early in the morning. Asthma affects people of all ages, but it most often starts during childhood. In the United States, more than 25 million people are known to have asthma. About 7 million of these people are children. Step # 1: Use an inhaled medication. Albuterol is a short-acting beta-2 agonist that temporarily relaxes airway muscles to help you control your breathing. Atrovent is an inhaled anticholinergic that can help to provide immediate relief. Atrovent works similarly to albuterol. Albuterol is used as a quick treatment for acute symptoms. Chronic symptoms are usually treated with a Flovent Diskus, which must be prescribed by your doctor. Step # 2: Take an oral prescription medication such as Theophylline. Theophylline is taken daily and is used as a long-term treatment to suppress asthma symptoms. Theophylline relaxes the muscles around airways, making it easier to breathe. Prednisone is a prescription medication is also used for long-term treatment to treat more severe asthma symptoms. Prednisone is only taken when needed. Step # 3: Exercise and maintain a healthy weight. Exercising daily not only helps to keep your weight down, it also strengthens your lungs. Strengthening your lungs reduces the pressure they feel when it’s difficult for you to breathe. Exercising doesn’t necessarily mean working out at a gym. Try taking a walk during your lunch break. Aim for 15 to 20 minutes of continuous, moderate activity per day. Eating healthy foods such as fruits and vegetables allow your body to use the food you eat as energy helping you to maintain a healthier weight. Step # 4: Use an air conditioner to reduce humidity and cleanse inside air. Clean the filters in your air conditioner and furnace regularly. Keeping the air in your home or office clean reduces the presence of allergens and can prevent coughs. Step # 5: Wear a face mask or cover your mouth with a clean scarf if cold, dry air aggravates your asthma. Step # 6: Control your stress and remain calm. Asthma can produce bouts of coughing lasting for a few seconds up to several minutes. Because these coughs can cause an attack, it is common for an asthma sufferer to become anxious or fearful. Breathe deeply or drink some water to calm the cough. Learning breathing exercises is a proactive way to learn how to calm yourself down when you become stressed. Step # 7: Drink water regularly to keep the bronchial tubes moist. I hope you understand my all Steps to get rid of Asthma. Please Like and Share this Video with your friends and family. 7 Simple and Naturally Steps on How to Get Rid of Asthma.
Views: 266 Healthy Lifestyle
Drugs for Asthma Treatment
 
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This is a short video on drugs used to treat the obstructive airway disease asthma. I created this presentation with Google Slides. Image were created or taken from Wikimedia Commons I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor. ADDITIONAL TAGS: Antigen/Irritant/Trigger INFLAMMATION -prolif/invasion of lymphocytes, eosinophils, macrophages, mast cells -mediators (IgE, IL5, leukotrienes) Reflex Parasympathetic Bronchospasm mucus secretion, vasodilation, collagen deposition, alveolar remodeling, hyperplasia, etc Sympathetic (β2-mediated) Bronchospasm Mediators DRUGS FOR ASTHMA Antigen/Irritant/Trigger Mediators INFLAMMATION -prolif/invasion of lymphocytes, eosinophils, macrophages, mast cells -mediators (IgE, IL5, leukotrienes) Sympathetic (β2-mediated) Bronchospasm Reflex Parasympathetic Bronchospasm mucus secretion, vasodilation, collagen deposition, alveolar remodeling, hyperplasia, etc β2-agonist (albuterol) long acting β2-agonist (salmeterol, formoterol) Muscarinic antagonist (ipratropium, tiotropium, umeclidinium) antibodies (omalizumab for IgE, mepolizumab for IL5) Inhaled Corticosteroids (ICS) PDE inhibitor (theophylline) Leukotriene blockers (zafirlukast, montelukast, zileuton) Antigen/Irritant/Trigger Mediators INFLAMMATION -prolif/invasion of lymphocytes, eosinophils, macrophages, mast cells -mediators (IgE, IL5, leukotrienes) Sympathetic (β2-mediated) Bronchospasm Reflex Parasympathetic Bronchospasm mucus secretion, vasodilation, collagen deposition, alveolar remodeling, hyperplasia, etc β2-agonist (albuterol) long acting β2-agonist (salmeterol, formoterol) Muscarinic antagonist (ipratropium, tiotropium, umeclidinium) antibodies (omalizumab for IgE, mepolizumab for IL5) Inhaled Corticosteroids (ICS) PDE inhibitor (theophylline) Leukotriene blockers (zafirlukast, montelukast, zileuton) Antigen/Irritant/Trigger Mediators INFLAMMATION -prolif/invasion of lymphocytes, eosinophils, macrophages, mast cells -mediators (IgE, IL5, leukotrienes) Sympathetic (β2-mediated) Bronchospasm Reflex Parasympathetic Bronchospasm mucus secretion, vasodilation, collagen deposition, alveolar remodeling, hyperplasia, etc β2-agonist (albuterol) long acting β2-agonist (salmeterol, formoterol) Muscarinic antagonist (ipratropium, tiotropium, umeclidinium) antibodies (omalizumab for IgE, mepolizumab for IL5) Inhaled Corticosteroids (ICS) PDE inhibitor (theophylline) Leukotriene blockers (zafirlukast, montelukast, zileuton) Antigen/Irritant/Trigger Mediators INFLAMMATION -prolif/invasion of lymphocytes, eosinophils, macrophages, mast cells -mediators (IgE, IL5, leukotrienes) Sympathetic (β2-mediated) Bronchospasm Reflex Parasympathetic Bronchospasm mucus secretion, vasodilation, collagen deposition, alveolar remodeling, hyperplasia, etc β2-agonist (albuterol) long acting β2-agonist (salmeterol, formoterol) Muscarinic antagonist (ipratropium, tiotropium, umeclidinium) antibodies (omalizumab for IgE, mepolizumab for IL5) Inhaled Corticosteroids (ICS) PDE inhibitor (theophylline) Leukotriene blockers (zafirlukast, montelukast, zileuton) short acting beta two agonist beta2 betatwo b2 btwo agonist short acting muscarinic cholinergic agonist
Views: 54082 MedLecturesMadeEasy
Anatomy and Physiology of Respiratory System
 
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Anatomy and Physiology of Respiratory System ventilator copd anatomy respiratory system human anatomy nervous system human body immune system lungs pulmonary fibrosis cardiovascular system reproductive system lung chronic obstructive pulmonary disease types of cancer lung disease human body systems lung infection pulmonary function test respiratory infection the respiratory system musculoskeletal system organ system respiratory diseases human respiratory system respiratory system diagram pulmonary disease lung diseases respiratory rate respiratory system diseases digestive system diseases asthma definition body system the immune system bronchogenic carcinoma internal respiration respiratory system for kids human lungs different types of cancer respiratory system functions what is respiratory system respiratory system definition human body system parts of the respiratory system parts of respiratory system the lungs lung problems function of respiratory system what is the respiratory system skeletal system functions pulmonary system cancer disease respiratory system function what is the function of the respiratory system respiratory disease muscular system functions sensory system diseases of the respiratory system respiratory disorders how does the respiratory system work respiratory system organs respiratory physiology pulmonary nodules small cell cancer functions of the respiratory system function of the respiratory system respiratory problems respiratory medicine lymphatic system functions breathing system respitory system diseases of respiratory system diagram of respiratory system what does the respiratory system do respiratory system quiz lung infections definition of asthma chronic asthma lungs diseases respiratory system facts respiratory system parts diagram of the respiratory system organs of the respiratory system lung model define respiratory system urinary system functions structure of the respiratory system respiratory definition organs in the respiratory system anatomy of respiratory system lung conditions smoking cancer how does cancer spread types of lung disease the human body organs functions of respiratory system respiratory protection what is the muscular system facts about the respiratory system definition of respiratory system the human respiratory system respiratory system in humans anatomy of the respiratory system respiratory system anatomy respiratory system worksheet respiratory and circulatory system lung disorders smoking and cancer anatomy human anatomy body what does asthma feel like upper respiratory system how the respiratory system works disease of respiratory system respiratory system of human interactive anatomy respiratory system pdf respiratory system quizlet digestive system pictures
Symptoms of Asthma : What are the Symptoms of Asthma in Children?
 
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http://homeremedies9.com/common-remedies/home-remedies-a/asthma/ There’re numerous types of life-long illnesses that have become visible with the passing time and we are forced by nature to breath between these diseases. We can categorise Millions of human living with Asthma throughout the world in which certain people suffering from mild indications while rest suffering from intense well-being complications. Asthma is a kind of intense sickness that generally affects our airways of the lungs. This is the inflammatory sickness of lungs and our airways that blocks breathing procedure of a person. This circumstance makes hard for an asthmatic people to inhale an exhale. A research of 2013 has stated that globally much more than 223 million people experiencing this illness & it caused 462,000 deaths in 2013. There’re numerous causes have been explored by the scientists that can play a major role in the occurrence of Asthma . It is believed that 25 % patient with hay fever developed Asthma. If you smoke the possibilities will elevate to evolve asthma because smoking hazardously affects lungs and airways. The polluted atmosphere can also play a primary character of the development of asthma. asthma, asthma attack, what is asthma, asthma guidelines, what causes asthma, causes asthma, signs of asthma, asthma-definition, allergy and asthma, asthma attack causes, asthma treatment, asthma symptoms asthma attack symptoms, symptoms of asthma, signs of an asthma attack, signs and symptoms of asthma,
Views: 46 ashlena jolie
Congestive heart failure (CHF) - systolic, diastolic, left side, right side, & symptoms
 
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What is congestive heart failure (CHF)? CHF is when the heart isn't able to pump enough blood to meet the body's demands, which leads to congestion—or fluid buildup—in various parts of the body and lungs. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what you’re learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the world’s caregivers with the best learning experience possible.
Views: 650848 Osmosis
What does asthma mean to me? | GSK
 
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Asthma can affect people in different ways depending on the severity of their condition. It creates a substantial burden on individuals and their families and often restricts a patient’s activities for a lifetime. But nobody describes the impact of asthma better than patients themselves. In this short video, patients tell us what asthma means to them. Find out more at: http://gsk.to/1OLZdP6 Follow @GSK on Twitter: http://twitter.com/GSK Like GSK on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/GSK Follow GSK on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/glaxosmithkline Subscribe to GSK on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=gskvision See more on GSK Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/glaxosmithkline
Views: 2932 GSK
Asthma Attack - The Correct Treatment
 
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***Full DVD here with YouTube discount - https://shop.justdoitguides.co.uk/ An Asthma attack can be fatal. We show you the latest protocol, how to spot and treat an Asthma attack. Taken from First Aid - A Comprehensive Guide, on one easy to navigate DVD. Covering all the major areas of First Aid, this is perfect for annual refresher training. Produced by Just Do It Guides, A1 First Aid and Concept Filming. For more info, see http://www.firstaiddvd.co.uk.
Views: 61899 justdoitguides
Chronic Bronchitis vs Emphysema Pathophysiology, Treatment, Nursing, Symptoms | COPD NCLEX Review
 
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Chronic bronchitis vs emphysema nursing lecture on the pathophysiology, treatment, and symptoms. In this video, I review the similarities between emphysema vs chronic bronchitis and highlight the differences. The biggest differences between chronic bronchitis and emphysema are the pathophysiology and disease specific symptoms. In chronic bronchitis, there is excessive production of mucous and inflammation of the bronchioles. However, in emphysema there is the loss of elasticity of the alveolar sacs. Both conditions lead to respiratory acidosis. However, there is a V/Q mismatch in chronic bronchitis and a matched V/Q defect in emphysema and because of this the body compensates differently. In chronic bronchitis (also called blue bloaters) the patient will have cyanosis and bloating (from hyperinflation and late effects of cor pulmonale). In emphysema (called pink puffers), the patient will have hyperventilation and a barrel chest (no cyanosis due to the hyperventilation). Both conditions are irreversible, caused by inhaling an irritants (mainly smoking), and treated with bronchodilators, corticosteroids, theophylline, or Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors. Don't forget to watch the in-depth review on COPD which explains the nursing interventions and side effects of medications. Quiz: http://www.registerednursern.com/chronic-bronchitis-vs-emphysema-quiz/ Lecture Notes: http://www.registerednursern.com/chronic-bronchitis-vs-emphysema-nclex-review-notes/ Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing-career-help/ Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos Popular Playlists: NCLEX Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 Fluid & Electrolytes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv Nursing Skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Nursing School Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms Nursing School Tips & Questions" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF Types of Nursing Specialties: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp Healthcare Salary Information: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh New Nurse Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy Nursing Career Help: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj EKG Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt Personality Types: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU0qHnOjj2jf4Hw8aJaxbtm Dosage & Calculations for Nurses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq Diabetes Health Managment: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 63438 RegisteredNurseRN
Childhood Asthma: What Can I Do About It?
 
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Childhood asthma is the most common chronic condition in children. Asthma in children causes chronic inflammation of the airways. That means the airways are always inflamed, even when kids aren’t having any symptoms. Many things can cause an asthma attack or flare-up, but there are things you can do to control asthma and prevent flare-ups. Learn more: https://connect.bcbstx.com/health-and-wellness/b/weblog/archive/2015/08/06/your-childs-asthma-steps-to-safety
Drugs used in Asthma and COPD - Simply Finals 2016
 
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PLEASE NOTE - This was recorded in 2016. For the latest version of this talk, please visit our website: www.simplyrevision.org.uk Lecture given by Dr Andrew Smith. Simply Finals is a free medical revision course. For lecture slides, please visit www.simplyrevision.org.uk. Don't forget to like us on Facebook.
Views: 19221 Simply Finals
What is Asthma? Dr. Mahashur
 
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Dr. Ashok Mahashur, Consultant Chest Physician at the P.D. Hinduja Hospital in Mumbai explains what is Asthma. As one of the leading respiratory diseases affecting people in India, Asthma is also known as chronic bronchitis. Watch the video to understand what it means. SPEAK Health by Sun Pharma is about having simple conversations in care. SPEAK Health empowers you with the knowledge that enables you to take better responsibility for your treatment. Sun Pharma Education & Awareness Kaleidoscope – Reaching People. Touching Lives. !!! Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/speakforhealth & https://www.facebook.com/speakhealthmen Subscribe us Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/speakhealth https://www.youtube.com/speakhealthregional
Views: 15729 Speak Health
Just a sneak peak of an asthma mom life.
 
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Chronic asthma, we need a cure ❤
Views: 58 Shelly Rosario
COPD (Shortness Of Breath) Discussing with Dr. Shivraaj Sharma in Health First Program
 
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Watch Health First Programme with Well known Dr. Shivraaj Sharma, Chest and TB Junior Specialist who is going to tell you about COPD (Shortness Of Breath) disease... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease that makes it difficult to breathe... COPD is the fourth leading cause of death... get treatment for COPD. For more updates you could also follow Twitter : https://twitter.com/1stIndiaNews For more updates you could also follow facebook: https://www.facebook.com/1stIndiaNews and subscribe channel on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/firstindiatv First india news Website Link: http://www.firstindianews.com/
Views: 16147 1st India News
Severe Asthma: Evaluation, Management and New Advances
 
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Join Bradley Chipps, MD, FACAAI, as we examine the topic of severe asthma. There have been many advances in the care of severe asthma and Dr. Chipps will provide us with valuable asthma management information.
Views: 419 breatherville
asthma definition in urdu
 
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Asthma is a common long-term inflammatory disease of the airways of the lungs.[3] It is characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, reversible airflow obstruction, and bronchospasm.[10] Symptoms include episodes of wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath.[2] These episodes may occur a few times a day or a few times per week.[3] Depending on the person, they may become worse at night or with exercise.[3] Asthma is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.[4] Environmental factors include exposure to air pollution and allergens.[3] Other potential triggers include medications such as aspirin and beta blockers.[3] Diagnosis is usually based on the pattern of symptoms, response to therapy over time, and spirometry.[5] Asthma is classified according to the frequency of symptoms, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and peak expiratory flow rate.[11] It may also be classified as atopic or non-atopic, where atopy refers to a predisposition toward developing a type 1 hypersensitivity reaction.[12][13] There is no cure for asthma.[3] Symptoms can be prevented by avoiding triggers, such as allergens and irritants, and by the use of inhaled corticosteroids.[6][14] Long-acting beta agonists (LABA) or antileukotriene agents may be used in addition to inhaled corticosteroids if asthma symptoms remain uncontrolled.[15][16] Treatment of rapidly worsening symptoms is usually with an inhaled short-acting beta-2 agonist such as salbutamol and corticosteroids taken by mouth.[7] In very severe cases, intravenous corticosteroids, magnesium sulfate, and hospitalization may be required.[17] In 2015, 358 million people globally had asthma, up from 183 million in 1990.[8][18] It caused about 397,100 deaths in 2015,[9] most of which occurred in the developing world.[3] It often begins in childhood.[3] The rates of asthma have increased significantly since the 1960s.[19] Asthma was recognized as early as Ancient Egypt.[20] The word "asthma" is from the Greek ἅσθμα, ásthma, which means "panting
Views: 24 Tips with Hassan
Asthma in School
 
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With summer drawing a close, 9-year-old Andrew Konkus will soon be back at school and away from his mother. Andrew suffers from severe asthma. "We started tracking patterns. Spring and fall are really bad for him, it affects him with sports, it affects him with being in school," says Andrew's mother Colleen Konkus. Along with his school supplies, Andrew will carry a lot of responsibility with him. "It's scary as a parent because if he has an asthma attack due to his allergies and if he's on the school bus, that worries me. So we do have paperwork filled out from his pediatrician to allow him to carry an inhaler at all times," says Konkus. Its estimate 7-million kids under the age of 18 have asthma and it counts for 13-million missed school days. If the condition is well managed, kids can go to school and parents can have a peace of mind. "Every child that comes into the program we immediately contact the school nurse," says Teresa Summe. Teresa coordinates the Asthma Management Program for Lee Memorial Health System. "The school nurse works with the teachers so that the child has the medication with them when they need it. We work with the PE coaches, whoever needs to be in the whole picture. We want the child to be comfortable," says Summe. Parents should also have an action plan to include: reinforcing their children's medications and uses, making sure they know their triggers and early symptoms and what to do if they have a flare-up at school. "We have children that will come in and they're hiding in the restrooms, taking her medications or some haven't even told the school nurses," says Summe. When it comes to asthma, knowledge is power. "I just take off this cap, put my lips up to it," says Andrew. Something Andrew has already learned.
Views: 10669 Lee Health
Understanding Asthma (Asthma #1)
 
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More than 20 million Americans have some form of the disease known as asthma. Get the basics on this common condition.Watch More Health Videos at Health Guru: http://www.healthguru.com/?YT
Views: 533597 Healthguru
Non-Drug Treatment for Severe Asthma (Bronchial Thermoplasty) | El Camino Hospital
 
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Approved by the FDA in 2010, Bronchial Thermoplasty is a minimally invasive bronchoscopic procedure that uses a bronchoscope to deliver thermal energy to reduce excessive smooth muscle in the airway and increase airflow. Studies show great results for patients with severe asthma: 32% fewer severe asthma attacks 73% reduction in hospitalizations for respiratory symptoms 84% fewer asthma-related emergency room visits Watch to learn more about this amazing non-drug treatment for severe asthma from Dr. Ganesh Krishna, an interventional pulmonologist and expert in BT treatment.
Views: 1906 El Camino Hospital
THE DOCTORS Explains The Major Types of Coughs
 
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Subscribe to The Doctors: http://bit.ly/SubscribeTheDrs LIKE us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/FacebookTheDoctors Follow us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TheDrsTwitter Follow us on Pinterest: http://bit.ly/PinterestTheDrs One of the biggest "sick day" culprits is the cough, but it can be hard to determine whether a cough requires over-the-counter medicine and rest or a visit to the doctor. On Wednesday, March 7 THE DOCTORS explains the four major types of coughs.
Views: 1009700 The Doctors