Home
Search results “Why do australians have skin cancer”
Why THIS Country Has The Deadliest Skin Cancer
 
04:38
G’day everyone! For certain, we all know of someone who has suffered from cancer. It’s among the leading causes of death worldwide, with skin cancer being one of the most common at more than 3 million cases reported globally each year. [SCIQ INTRO] Let’s put that in perspective: Here in the states in 2010, 74,000 Americans were diagnosed with cancer of the skin. That same year, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare released a study revealing that we Aussies have the highest rate of melanoma, and one of the highest overall rates of cancer – in the WORLD. At the time, more than 100,000 cases of skin cancer were reported in the country. 74,000 in the giant United States with its huge populations but 100,000 in tiny Australia Fast forward to today: According to the Cancer Council of Australia, 134,000 Australians are gonna be diagnosed with skin cancer by the end of this year, and 150,000 by 2020. That’s more than DOUBLE the rate of the U.S., who in 2017 is expected to have only about 87,000 cases. Numbers for BOTH countries have gone up, but why are we Aussies getting skin cancer at a higher rate than anyone else? Is it because we love the sun, live by the beach, and are always down to play rugby and AFL footy and a game of netty (whispers: netball)? So basically, our addiction to sports why we get cancer? Or is it that we came from English and European stock, and our fair skin is not made for the harsh Australian climate? You know the hole that lets the harmful UV rays in from the sun? ya, that one. And where is that hole located? Right over Antarctica. Cold, right? Well, hot, rather… because that massive gaping hole in the ozone layer creates an increased exposure to the effects of the sun’s UV radiation, and as we know... overexposure to the sun is a contributing factor to skin cancer in particular. The harmful effects of those rays are so strong that even in Australia, 7,246 km or 4,502 miles away, we are affected by the hole in the ozone layer. Now, this doesn’t mean that scientists have discovered in their research that everyone in Australia has now, all of a sudden, developed cancer – or will in the future. However, even decades later these gases, through several chemical reactions, have caused the ozone’s molecules to break down, reducing its capacity to absorb UV rays. It took us a while to catch onto the fact that the products we were using were destroying the ozone. And it took us an equally long time--decades worth of emitting chlorofluorocarbons into the atmosphere--before we got ourselves together and banned them. But, good news Last year, more than 30 years after scientists first spotted the hole in the atmosphere's protective ozone, measurements taken last year showed that the ozone hole has shrunk by more than 1.5 million square miles--that’s about half of the continental United States. So that means the hole in the ozone layer is healing and thats all happened since the year 2000. So things are getting better. But even though thats good news, I now have some bad news. Sources: https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/understanding/statistics https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/statistics/ http://www.aihw.gov.au/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=6442472684 https://medicalxpress.com/news/2010-12-australians-world-highest-skin-cancer.html https://www.census.gov/popclock/ http://www.who.int/uv/faq/skincancer/en/index1.html http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/0/1647509ef7e25faaca2568a900154b63?OpenDocument https://www.fda.gov/radiation-emittingproducts/radiationemittingproductsandprocedures/tanning/ucm116425.htm http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.3322/caac.20073/asset/20073_ftp.pdf;jsessionid=996F5C7CBADBE059BDA6FF429AC616F6.f01t03?v=1&t=j3vufqbv&s=7e53f190513b8796764df62a9992a118739aef0c http://abcnews.go.com/International/antarcticas-ozone-hole-shrinking-study-shows/story?id=40277104 This video is presented by Jayde Lovell, Directed by Mizanur Rahman, Edited by Sarita Liu. Script was written by Wandy Ortiz at Youtube Space NY. SCIQ ON THE YOUNG TURKS Produced by Jayde Lovell and Bec Susan Gill. ScIQ is a partner of the The Young Turks Network. Follow SciQ on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ScIQ_TYT Support ScIQ on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/sciQ Follow SciQ on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sciq.tyt?ref=hl Follow ScIQ on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sciq_tyt/ Follow ScIQ on Tumblr: http://sciqtyt.tumblr.com/ Follow Jayde on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jaydelovell Follow Jayde on Instagram: www.instagram.com/jaydelovell Follow Bec on Twitter: https://twitter.com/becsusangill Follow Bec on Instagram: https://instagram.com/becsusangill CONTACT For enquiries – please email bec@tytnetwork.com or jayde@tytnetwork.com
Views: 9716 ScIQ
Skin Cancer In Australia
 
01:05
Views: 4158 Marcus Binge
Dying for a Tan - Australia
 
14:00
May 2005 For many, sizzling in the midday sun is one of the delights of summer. But as teenagers continue to ignore the sun safety message, more and more young people are developing skin cancer. "It's a really hard thing to be told you're going to die," confides Steven Nielson. He was 20 when he was first diagnosed with skin cancer. Now, the cancer has spread to his spine and he's nearing the end of this life. Benjamin Foley was 16 when he was first diagnosed and Renee Marchment 24. "We see so many people who are totally unaware of the risks they're taking by sunbathing," states Prof John Thompson. Many refuse to wear a hat or sunscreen. As Ben states: "I thought I was invincible from the sun. I thought skin cancer only happened to older people. I was wrong."
Views: 153660 Journeyman Pictures
Australia takes its fight against cancer into the digital age
 
02:32
Australia is well known for its 'sun, surf and sand' lifestyle.   And it's that over-exposure to the sun's harsh rays that's driving up the rate of skin cancer.   So, scientists there are taking the fight against deadly melanomas into the digital age. They're developing a wearable patch that could alert people on their smart phones when they're getting too much sun.   Al Jazeera's Andrew Thomas explains from Sydney. - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 2157 Al Jazeera English
Cancer Council Australia's launch of National Skin Cancer Action Week 2012
 
03:37
This clip from Channel 10's The Project reports on Cancer Council Australia's launch of National Skin Cancer Action Week 2012. On Wednesday November 21st, Cancer Council Australia issued a stark warning to Australian blokes; every day, two men aged 45 or over die of melanoma. Men aged 45 and over are at more than double the risk of dying of melanoma than women the same age and yet they're still failing to take sun protection seriously. Although melanoma can develop anywhere on the body, around 1 in 3 cases in men occur on the back. Tennis legends John Newcombe and Tony Roche, who have both had skin cancers, are working with Cancer Council to urge men aged 45 and over to 'watch your back' in two ways: always protect yourself in the sun and check your entire body for skin changes. Ask your wife, partner or a mate to check your back, and anywhere else you can't see yourself. Melanoma patient Garry Callaghan, 60, from Loftus, NSW, understands the importance of the message after being diagnosed with a malignant melanoma on his back. Look for a new mole, or any change in shape, colour or size of a mole or spot. Visit your doctor if you notice any changes. Visit http://www.cancer.org.au/watchyourback for more information
Views: 7695 Cancer Council
Dear Melanoma: How one mole changed Emma Betts’ life
 
28:40
Brisbane woman Emma Betts was just 22 when she was diagnosed with stage 4 melanoma. Instead of retreating, she put herself in the spotlight in her mission to make others aware of the importance of sun safety and raise money for melanoma research. If this Australian Story doesn’t make you get a skin check, nothing will.
Views: 15287 ABC News (Australia)
Hot Skin Cancer Is Killing White People In AUSTRALIA
 
00:41
white people dying in australia to hot skin cancer
White People Dying In Australia To Hot Skin Cancer
 
00:41
Hot Skin Cancer Is Killing White People In Australia
Views: 530 Kalifa Makoma
Arizona 2nd highest in skin cancer cases, behind Australia
 
02:35
Valley doctors are offering advice on how to avoid skin cancer as the heat goes up in Arizona.
Views: 317 ABC15 Arizona
Cansema Black Salve   Skin Cancer Australia
 
07:29
Australian woman Nirvana Anderson details her experience with Aldara and Cansema Black Salve. After watching her father be mutilated by conventional skin cancer treatment she searched for a way to treat her skin without harsh chemicals or surgery. AUSTRALIAN PETITION TO HAVE CANSEMA BLACK SALVE DECRIMINALISED: 1. https://www.change.org/petitions/australian-government-decriminalise-the-use-of-cansema-black-salve-on-human-beings# BUY THE MOVIE ($10 AUD) THAT PRESENTS THE FULL STORY OF BLACK SALVE AND SHOWS YOU HOW TO MAKE IT YOURSELF HERE (BEFORE THE GOVERNMENT BANS IT) : http://www.oneanswertocancermovie.com/ The TGA sent two men 1,800km to my home to shut down my website where I talked about Black Salve although I didn't sell it. They had no interest in my results, they just wanted me to be quiet. This youtube posting is the only option I now have to present my own experience and results. My 19 treatments cost me $60 which was the cost of one tub of Black Salve. Surgery would have cost me thousands. I am not a scammer. I am an ordinary Australian mother who watched her father and other relatives be mutilated by conventional skin cancer treatments. When I stumbled on Black Salve in 2010, I decided that I should try it so my children could be better informed about options and not have to surrender to the knife. My father's skin cancer treatments never ended. He had numerous skin grafts, the most noticeable was one on his forehead which had long hairs growing out of it. It had been transplanted from a hairy area of his body and the hairs continued to grow. He used to get up to a hundred cancers burnt off with liquid nitrogen at one time. All this made it obvious - conventional medicine is not winning the battle against skin cancer. When you try this product and have good results please pay it forward. Take photos, keep records of how what happened and post on youtube. We simply can't allow this product to remain in the shadows.
Views: 71573 cobainmatrix
Skin Cancer - Behind the News
 
03:32
TEACHER RESOURCES (yr 5&6 Health and PE) "Students will develop a deeper understanding of what ultraviolet radiation is and the health effects of too much UV radiation. They will also plan and practise strategies to promote sun safety in their community." http://www.abc.net.au/btn/resources/teacher/episode/20161122-skincancer.pdf BTN STORY PAGE http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s4576616.htm RELATED BTN STORY Sun Damage: http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s4126812.htm Cancer: http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3939285.htm
Views: 1680 Behind the News
Skin Cancer in Australia - Dr. Ian Katz
 
09:43
This is a preview of Skin Cancer in Australia by Dr. Ian Katz at the 2008 A5M Australia Conference. Visit www.instatapes.com to purchase this lecture and many others on DiGiVision, video and slides synced. Also, visit www.worldhealth.net for the conference sponsor. Item #A5M-081W34
Views: 424 DigiVision Media
Australian Skin Cancer PSA
 
00:30
Intense melanoma PSA from Australia.
Views: 15059 plinke
Early detection of skin cancer
 
05:59
A short video by Cancer Council WA showing how a skin check is performed and what to look for.
The dark side of tanning
 
00:31
30 second ad that warns against tanning by showing how tanning can lead to melanoma.
Black Salve Info - Skin Cancers, Melanoma
 
03:14
Australian's with skin cancer, including melanoma being interviewed about their success with Cansema Black Salve. These are clips taken from the movie "One Answer to Cancer" by Elaine Hollingsworth. The full version is available from www.oneanswertocancermovie.com and on www.amazon.com.
Views: 191506 Elaine Hollingsworth
Michael's Skin Cancer Story
 
02:04
Michael was 25 when he was diagnosed with stage 4 melanoma. He shared his story with Cancer Council for National Skin Cancer Action week 2014.
What causes skin cancer?
 
00:52
Skin Cancer and you? In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 130 Westymedia
Skin Cancer -- The Dangers of a Deadly Tan (and Solariums)
 
08:34
The battle waged by health experts to convince young people in particular about the dangers of tanning appears to be a losing one. Clare Oliver, a young woman whose most precious wish is to live long enough to see her 26th birthday next weekend, offers heartfelt advice on the dangers of a deadly tan.
Views: 62152 DermNet
Skin Cancer    What is a Nodular  Basal Cell Carcinoma  BBC)?
 
01:18
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 1991 Westymedia
Skin Cancer  What is Bowens disease
 
01:10
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre, Melanoma, Dr Sally Shaw, Mr Max Redman, Dr Mary Tai Kie, Dr Hazel Addison, Molemapping, Skin Checks, Pensioners, HCC holders, DVA card holder, Cancer, www.westymedia.com, skin cancer and sun damage, Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre, Skin Cancer Frankston, www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au, David Westbrook, Westymedia
Views: 4096 Westymedia
How common is skin cancer and can it be treated?
 
00:57
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 254 Westymedia
Australian Skin Cancer Spot
 
00:30
Spot showing a woman with skin cancer on her back.
Views: 14824 Annie Allen
Skin Cancer    Melanoma in situ
 
01:47
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 2193 Westymedia
What are the risk factors  for skin cancer?
 
01:32
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com David Westbrook
Views: 192 Westymedia
The Damage Is Done | MoleMap
 
00:16
Australia has some of the highest rates of skin cancer and melanoma globally. Much of this has to do with the nation's love for the outdoors, our sun-worshipping culture, and our geographic location. Of all newly diagnosed cancers each year in Australia, 80% are skin cancers, and by age 70 every 2 in 3 Australians will have skin cancer. While skin cancer awareness is the highest its ever been, for many Australians the damage was done decades ago. Remember, regular skin cancer checks are vital for early detection and treatment, and an early diagnosis could save your life. Enquire about your MoleMap screening today. Website: https://molemap.net.au/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/molemapaustralia/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/molemapau/
Views: 37 MoleMap Australia
Skin Cancer    Melanoma Biopsy
 
01:26
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 497 Westymedia
What is the role of a skin cancer doctor?
 
01:22
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 19 Westymedia
Skin Cancer    What is a BCC
 
01:33
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 85 Westymedia
How to spot skin cancers
 
09:19
Instagram- new videos on scar revision weekly https://www.instagram.com/drdavinlim/ Lasers and Lifts – website to be released in December 2016 http://www.lasersandlifts.com.au Realself reviews: http://www.realself.com/find/Australi... Google + for up to date info. Posted daily.  https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/1139391... DVA skin cancer management  There are many types of skin cancers including BCCs or basal cell cancers, SCC or squamous cell cancers as well as melanomas. Todays review is on Bowen disease or Intraepidermal Squamous Cell Carcinoma. This is a common non-invasive cancer of the skin affecting the epidermal layers of skin. IECs most frequently occur on sun-exposed areas and present as red, scaly and persistent patches. IECs may arise de-novo, or from lesions of solar keratosis. If left untreated, Bowen disease may progress to an invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma. This is one of the most common skin cancers I see in DVA or Department of Defence patients in Australia, and is due to the high UV radiation we have in cities like Brisbane.  Clinical Features Bowen disease most frequently presents as a persistent red scaly patch that slow grows over time. The most commonly affect areas include the legs, arms, and face- areas of sun exposure. Bowen disease or IECs can also affect the lips, oral mucosa, or even genital areas. As Bowen Disease is asymptomatic there is often a delay in the diagnosis, as it may mimic conditions such as dermatitis, psoriasis, tinea, and sun-spots.  Associations Most cases of Bowen disease arise from sun-damaged skin, including areas of actinic keratosis. The most common associations include- UV radiation. This plays a major contributing factor in the development of IECs. Immunosuppression. Patients on certain immunosuppressive medications are more likely to develop IECs.  Arsenic exposure. This was a common cause of Bowen Disease in the past, as arsenic was frequently used in medicines during the 60s and 70s including Bells Asthma Mixture, sheep dip, and as pesticides. Arsenic induced IECs-Bowen disease is a rare event today, as occupational safety has increased. A time lag of 10-20 years is seen between exposure and cancer.  Human Papilloma virus infections. Other associations include genetic diseases, radiotherapy and skin lesions such as porokeratosis, and solar keratosis. Investigations Bowen’s Disease can be suspected clinically, however in the majority of cases, a biopsy should be performed to confirm the diagnosis.  Treatment  There are multiple ways to manage Bowens/IECs. Treatment modalities will depend on the location and size of the cancer, the number of lesions, the degree of functional impairment.  Each modality has both advantages and disadvantages.  Cryotherapy or liquid nitrogen  Liquid nitrogen can be an excellent method of treating IECs. Most cases will require a double –freeze cycle of cryotherapy. This treatment is not recommended for IECs below the knee, as poor healing may occur.  Creams  Imiquimod, or 5-fluorouracil are effective in the treatment of Bowen disease. Clinical studies have shown cure rates approaching 80-90%. Treatment appears to be most successful when these creams are applied for 6-16 weeks.   Curettage and Electrocautery When small patches of IECs are present they may be treated via curettage and cautery. A local anaesthetic is given prior to the procedure to prevent pain and discomfort.  Photodynamic therapy  Photodynamic therapy or PDT can be an excellent non-surgical method of treating skin cancers such as Bowen’s/ IEC’s. PDT uses  a photosensitive cream called 5-aminolevulinic acid or methyl aminolevulinate, that is applied to the skin cancer. The cancerous cells of Bowens/ IEC take up this chemical over a period of 3 hours. A low-level laser light then activates the chemical, and destroys the skin cancer cells. Patients will require two treatments spaced a week or two apart. DVA or the Department of Veteran Affairs in Brisbane, covers PDT for both sunspots on the face and also IECs on all areas. PDT can also be used for multiple or large IECs. The benefit of PDT is that it selectively targets neoplastic cells without affecting the surrounding epidermis. This results in improved cosmetic outcomes, and faster healing times.  Surgery  Surgery is the ideal method of treating IECs in certain areas including recurrent IEC or ones that dwell in hair follicles. Surgery has the highest cure rate for Bowens/ IECs. For the majority of patients, especially DVA patients in Australia, non surgical methods, including the use of photodynamic therapy, is the future. Dr Davin Lim, Dermatologist. Brisbane Australia.  Recommended pimple popping video for the week below A Goldmine of Blackheads and Whitehead Extractions in a man with a history of skin cancers- by Dr. Sandra Lee (aka Dr.Pimple Popper) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4daKOqHkDbU Dear 16 -year-old Me by DCMFCanada https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4jgUcxMezM
Views: 29023 Dr Davin Lim
A love story so powerful it might save your life - Part one | 60 Minutes Australia
 
11:04
When Ben Debono’s wife of three months, Leah, died of melanoma earlier this year he was heartbroken – until his grief was overtaken by anger. Ben says 29-year-old Leah should still be alive. Like most Australians, she was sun-smart and knew the dangers of melanoma. When she noticed an unusual mole on her arm she immediately had it examined by two doctors. They reassured Leah she had nothing to worry about, but they were wrong. Now Ben is on a crusade, travelling the country on the honeymoon he never had, warning other Australians about the risks of this deadly disease. Reporter: Allison Langdon Producer: Bryce Corbett
Views: 96435 60 Minutes Australia
Skin Cancer: Keeping it in Check
 
01:07:43
Australia has the highest skin cancer incidence rate in the world. Skin cancer, in particular non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), is the most common type of cancer in Australia. Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. Skin cancer accounts for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. The burden of this disease is greater for those living in rural areas than for those living in metropolitan areas. Melanoma is the least common type of skin cancer; however it is the ninth most common cause of cancer death. One in fourteen males and one in twenty-two females will develop melanoma in their life time. Melanoma is the most common form of cancer affecting people aged 15 to 44 years. Most patients with skin cancer are diagnosed and managed in primary care with limited access to specialists, especially in rural and remote areas. There is an increasing awareness of skin cancer, yet the number of people affected by melanoma each year continues to rise. If melanoma is caught early, the risk of it spreading and causing death is low. This program discusses the risk factors and protective factors for skin cancer; early detection and diagnosis of skin cancer; and the various recommended treatment options. Produced by the Rural Health Education Foundation http://www.rhef.com.au/
Skin Cancer    Treatments for difficult BCCs
 
01:32
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 26 Westymedia
Wes Bonny's Story
 
01:33
Wes was no different to any other Australian young man. He played his cricket, his water skiing. Plus he's down the beach - loved beaches. Wes Bonny died of melanoma, aged 26. This is his story, told by his friends and family.
Skin Cancer  Understanding Biopsy  Dr Catherine Fyans  GP
 
01:31
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 217 Westymedia
Skin Cancer Presentation
 
01:58
This video clip explains how skin cancer develops in your body. http://southernsun.com.au Australia has the highest rate of skin cancer in the world. Around one in two Australians will develop skin cancer during their lifetime and around 1200 Australians die from skin cancer every year. The overall cost of skin cancer is estimated at over $300 million. Established in 2002, and renamed Southern Sun, we are dedicated to exceptional skin cancer diagnosis, treatment, prevention and education. A holistic and integrated clinical-pathologic approach is vital for the most efficient treatment of skin cancer in individual patients. Uniquely, we offer personal and uncomplicated information and an abundance of educational materials to our patients and the local community. We firmly believe that public education is part of our role in the community and are proud to announce that we are the only Skin Cancer Group with a dedicated Skin Cancer Education Officer. We have five locations in NSW: Hornsby Suite 13, The Madison 25-29 Hunter Street Hornsby, NSW Phone: 94825400 North Ryde 124a Epping Road (Corner of Lane Cove Road) North Ryde, NSW Phone: 98788555 Orange 286 Anson St Orange, NSW Phone: (02) 6362 9004 Parramatta 2nd Floor, 239 Church St Parramatta, NSW Phone: 9689 3244 Windsor 30 Fitzgerald St Windsor, NSW Phone: (02) 4577 3666 Visit http://southernsun.com.au to learn more
Views: 6070 SouthernSunClinic
Skin Cancer  What is the Ugly Duckling
 
00:47
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 117 Westymedia
Sam - skin cancer survivor
 
02:17
Australia has among the highest rate of skin cancer in the world. Nearly 12,000 Australians are diagnosed with skin cancer each year. Skin cancer can affect anyone at any age. It doesn't discriminate. Remember - take care of your skin and be SunSmart.
Views: 168 Cancer Council NSW
OET LISTENING POSTRUTE CANCER PURE AUSTRALIAN ACCENT
 
29:41
THIS LISTENING TRACK IS PURELY BASED ON AUSTRALIAN ACCENT...ALL THE OET TEST ARE FOLLOWED IN AUSTRALIAN ACCENT SO IT IS EASY FOR YOU TO GET HIGH SCORE IN OET TEST...PLEASE SUBSCRIBE MY CHANNEL
Views: 6537 Easy english 2018
What Happens in a skin check?
 
01:49
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 324 Westymedia
Types of Skin Cancer - SunSmart
 
01:45
This animation shows the three main types of skin cancer. Please note that the images shown are a guide only. Spots on your skin may look different. For more information, visit www.myuv.com.au/skincancer/
Cancer Council Don't be a victim
 
00:31
Crime scene community service announcement. 1700 Australians die from skin cancer each year.
Views: 6842 Cancer Council
Skin Cancer    Treatments of difficult BCC Dr Sally Shaw
 
01:06
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 156 Westymedia
7 News Australia - New technology is helping catch deadly skin cancer and save lives
 
00:59
Watch Firstcheck on Australia's 7 News! Firstcheck is profiled as one of the latest skin cancer technologies enabling mole checks without leaving home by accessing local skin specialists via your smartphone Early detection saves lives! To find out more, visit www.firstcheck.me And to download your FREE Firstcheck app go to https://firstcheck.app.link/downloadappyt
Views: 328 Firstcheck Skin
Skin Cancer   Talking about a team approach in treating skin cancer
 
01:48
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 24 Westymedia
Skin Cancer   Vitamin D is it important?
 
01:24
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 131 Westymedia
Skin cancer warning
 
00:31
Australia has one of the highest rates of skin cancer per head of population in the world. This ad created by Wilson Everard Advertising demonstrates the dangers of tanning by using a tattoo of the sun burning a young body.
Skin Cancer    Importance of asking questions
 
01:02
Skin Cancer and you? Peninsula Skin Cancer Centre Make an Appointment Phone: 5975 9544 http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au 93 Tanti Ave Mornington In Australia, every year: • Skin cancers account for 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers. • Two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70. • GPs in Australia have over 1 million patient consultations per year for skin cancer. • Around 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers, of which about 450 die. • More than 10,300 people are treated for melanoma, of which around 1250 die. • Melanoma is the most common cancer in people aged 15-44 years. • Excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, melanoma is the fourth most common cancer in both women and men. • Australia has one of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the world, at nearly four times the rates in Canada, the US and the UK. • The rate of melanoma incidence in women has risen by an average of 0.7% a year between 1993 and 2003 -- a total increase of 6.8% over this decade. For men, the rate has risen by 1.7% a year, a total of 18.7% over the same period. • The five-year relative survival rate for melanoma is 90% for Australian men and 95% for Australian women. Skin cancer is the most prevalent of all cancers. The main cause is over exposure to sunlight, especially sunburn. Family history is also an important risk factor. In the treatment of any skin cancers, early detection and removal is the best defence. As the sun is the main culprit, the most effective form of protection is to be sunsmart, using sun screen, a hat and shirt whenever possible. NB: It is essential that the medical staff have a clear view of your skin so when attending a skin check please be sure to have NO MAKE UP, SUNSCREEN OR MOISTURISER. On your arrivial our friendly reception staff will ensure they have the appropriate personal details required for your visit. (click here to complete form prior to appointment). You will then be directed to a waiting area. Once inside the Mole Mapping or Skin Check room the Melanographer or nurse will discuss your history and any concerns you may have. You will then be asked to change into a gown provided and the Mole Map or Skin Check will commence. At the end of the map or check a doctor will join you to examine all moles and lesions and discuss appropriate treatment if required. This will include information on costs and post treatment care. A full Mole Mapping can take up to one hour, a Skin Check consultation will take up to half an hour. NB: If possible please arrive without make up, sun screen or moisturisor on your skin. http://www.peninsulaskincancercentre.com.au Make an Appointment Phone: 93 Tanti Ave Mornington 5975 9544 or 2/374 Nepean Hwy Frankston 9770 0040 Produced by Westymedia.com
Views: 44 Westymedia